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Full text of "Sponsor"

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, \% 

i.SY 
30 V. ' ''I Y< 















/' c 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor51spon 



in ilex 




first tut if. vol. J 



JANUARY TO 
JUNE 1951 

Issued every six months 






Automotive and Lubricants 

Auto producers shift ad gears 1 Jan. p. 21 

D. Clements Sperry, Okla. Tire & Supply 

Company, profile 26 Feb. p. 16 

Firestone uses same show 23 years 26 Feb. p. 26 

George Miller, Richfield Oil, profile ... 21 May p. 10 

Broadcast Vdvertising Problems ami 
Developments 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield AM/TV dept. 1 

Korea awakens sponsors to AM values 15 

Pittsburgh paper strike is radio test 29 

Daytime TV nearing sellout point 29 

Problems of a TV soap opera 29 

Development of the Columbia Workshop 12 

How's NBC's "Big Show" doing? .. 12 

Special effects cut TV costs 12 



Radio status in Puerto Rico. 

Columbia Workshop offers valuable lessons .. 

TV costs soaring; sponsors sore 



26 
26 

26 

Educators' lobby means business 26 

9 
9 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



Preview of the new BAB 
Cash in with radio in summertime 
Radio moves wide variety of products in sum- 
mertime .... 9 

Record TV billings this summer.— 9 

Storecasting hits at point-of-sale 23 

Shall a station have both national and local 

rate cards? 23 Apr. 

"Michael" awards made by Academy of Radio 

and TV Arts and Sciences 7 

What net rate cut means to sponsors 7 

Research can be handy tool 7 

BMI offers program clinics for stations.. 7 

Does network radio have a future? 21 

Telestrip offers unique desk-top film show 21 

Spanish language programs hit potent market 4 
ABC-Paramount merger promises new strength 

for network 4 

Sylvania Electric uses radio in switch from 

trade to consumer advertising 4 

Spot radio research would be simplified by 

new Rorabaugh reports 4 June 

CBS presentation shows radio top advertising 

value 18 June 

Talent buying loaded with pitfalls 18 June 

Educating public big job of "Telephone Hour" 18 June 

Transit Radio fights for its life 18 June 

Affiliates Committee-ANA meet 18 June 

New Hofstra study results 18 June 

Clothing 

Department stores missing radio's power 26 Feb. 

Canadian Fur Corp. sells fur coats in August 

via radio 9 Apr. 



May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
June 

June 

June 



Commercials atul Sales 

Ben Grauer on commercials 

Old Gold Dancing Pack TV commercials 

Spot radio's top commercials 

Network radio's top commercials 

Radio hits at point-of-sale 

Spot TV's top commercials 

How Robert Q. Lewis sells for ASR 

How long does a TV commercial live? 

Kate Smith delivers commercials and sales ... 

Stop sugar coating your advertising 

Brand-consciousness stressed in frozen food 
TV commercials 



Aids 

1 Jan. 

12 Feb. 

26 Feb. 

26 Mar. 

23 Apr. 

23 Apr. 
7 May 
7 May 

21 May 

21 May 



18 June 



Confections and Soft Drinks 

Bar candy on the air 15 Jan. 



Wrigley "saturates" the air waves 
Canada Dry loves the hot weather 



9 Apr. 
9 Apr. 



30 
34 
28 
34 
38 
23 
30 
32 
18 
28 
30 
32 
17 
17 



p. 49 
p. 58 
p. 25 



36 

18 
21 
24 
32 
25 
34 
25 



p. 32 
p. 34 
p. 36 



19 
23 
26 
29 
28 
30 



p. 33 
p. 49 



26 
28 
23 
30 
25 
38 
26 



p. 28 

p. 36 

p. 38 

p. 32 



p. 38 
p. 42 
p. 50 



Contests antl Oilers 

Iladacol gives bikes for box-tops.. 15 Jan. 

Robert Q. Lewis makes free blade offer for 

American Safety Razor Corp 7 May 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Iladacol packs 'em in 15 Jan. 

Alka-Seltzer and radio make perfect union... 15 Jan. 

Tintair learns from Toni 15 Jan. 

Miles Laboratories learned from experience . 29 Jan. 

Hazel Bishop lipstick uses AM/TV effectively 12 May 

Tartan suntan lotion hits summer markets ... 9 Apr. 

Robert Q. Lewis sells blades for ASR 7 May 

Chlorophyll pills heavy AM/TV spenders 7 May 

Farm Radio 

Early morning segments ~t-ll D-Con rat killer 

to farmei - 1 Jan. 

Rural type shows sold Alka-Seltzer 15 Jan. 

KA \K. survey shows farmers like news, popu- 
lar music, and comedy shows 21 May 

Food and Beverages 

R. Stewart Boyd, National Biscuit, profile 1 Jan. 

Ian R. Dowie, Brewing Corp. of America, 

profile _ 

Daniel B. Scully, Nedicks, profile 12 

How Mueller's macaroni doubled its sales in 

nine years ._.. 

Bakers join in one-shot TV salute 

How Carnation invests 12,400,000 in air media 

Why White Tower fell for spot radio 

John J. Taylor, Jacob Ruppert Brewery, profile 

Brewers up radio/TV share of ad budget 23 

Eliot C. Stoutenburgh, Acme Breweries, profile 
Best Foods' on top with heavy AM /TV budget 
William M. Kline, Seabrook Farms Co., profile 
Frozen foods use radio/TV to build product 

identity 18 June 

Insurance and Finance 

Prudential's Jack Berch sells himself to the 



p. 21 
p. 26 



p. 21 

p. 25 

p. 30 

p. 26 

p. 31 

p. 40 

p. 26 

p. 30 



p. 24 
p. 25 

p. 22 



p. 12 



29 Jan. 


P- 


10 


12 Feb. 


P- 


18 


12 Mar. 


P- 


24 


26 Mar. 


P- 


20 


26 Mar. 


P- 


23 


26 Mar. 


P- 


28 


23 Apr. 


P- 


30 


23 Apr. 


P- 


30 


4 June 


P- 


18 


4 June 


P- 


28 


18 June 


P- 


8 



p. 32 



salesmen 



12 IV:, 



Mail Order and Per Inquiry 

Warfarin, new rat killer, starts off via mail 

order . 1 Jan. 

Mail-order customers to be protected 12 Feb. 

Mailorder outfits police themselves 23 Apr. 

Miseellfincoii.v Products ttnd Services 



36 



p. 25 
p. 21 
p. 28 



D-Con, new rodenticide, hits jackpot 1 Jan. 

Gerald Light, Emerson Radio, profile 15 Jan. 

Advertising and Marketing bibliography 29 Jan. 

TWA first airline-sponsored net show 29 Jan. 

Bellone sells people who cant hear 12 Feb. 

Successful radio/TV mail offer- 12 Feb. 

Mohawk Carpet uses radio/TV combo _ 12 Feb. 

Magazines use competitive media . 12 Feb. 

Case for use of radio by department stores 26 Feb. 

Gordon M. Philpott, Ralston Purina, profile ... 12 Mar. 

Radio sells Moore paint 12 Mar. 

Mohawk Carpet returns to radio 26 Mar. 

W. W. Wade, Eskimo Pie Corp., profile . 9 Apr. 

Tartan suntan lotion's summer strategy 9 Apr. 

Radio sells wide variety of products in sum- 
mertime 9 Apr. 

Storecast Corp. gets customers at point-of-sale 23 Apr. 

Leonard V. Colson, Mennen Co., profile _ 7 May 

Robert Q. Lewis pitches for American Safety 

Razor Corp. 7 May 

Programing info supplied at BMI clinic 7 May 

Hillman-Minx cars go far on small budget 21 May 



p. 24 

p. 18 

p. 12 

p. 30 

p. 26 



21 
21 
34 
33 
16 
19 
36 
31 
40 



p. 49 
p. 25 
p. 16 



26 
32 
32 



BINDERS are available to accommodate six-month supply of issues indexed. Cost is $4.00 per binder. 



13 AUGUST 1951 



43 



\\ ide variety of Best Foods' products cash in 
on radio's potency 

Sylvania Electric swings from trade to con- 
sumer advertising ._ _. 

Bell Telephone's advertising philosophy .. 

Programing 

Local live shows ring sponsors' cash registers 

Spot radio sells Warfarin rat killer 

When is it safe to simulcast? 

Alka-Seltzer's programing psychology 

Getting the most out of news sponsorship 

Spot programing trends in daytime TV 

Miles Lahoratories programed its way to 

success 

How to handle a TV soap opera 

Network shows get daytime TV audiences 

The fahulous Columbia Workshop 

Mohawk Carpet crosses TV with radio 

NBC's "Big Show" still missing big audience 

High-toned music sells for Firestone 

Spot radio, mostly news, did trick for Muel- 
ler's macaroni _ 

How Carnation programs $2,400,000 air budget 

Why White Tower fell for spot radio 

Educators' lobby means business 

Negro disk jockeys possess sales magic 

TV writing outfit promises low-cost program- 
ing 

Summer programs hit hefty markets _ 

Tartan suntan lotion heavy summer spender .... 

The saturation hoys are back 

Summer hiatus loses valuable sales 

Baseball : 1951 

Out-of-home listeners offer programing oppor- 
tunity 

Philip Morris uses year-'round programing 

Why soap operas take no summer hiatus 

How BKO stops box-office sag 

"Range Rider" is latest western TV film series 

Programing variety sells chlorophyll pills 

Rural listeners go for variety programs 

Lever Bros, programing matches sales ap- 
proach 

Local d.j.'s work for British car makers 

Kate Smith's first 20 years 

Foreign language programing thrives on NY's 

Italian-language audience 

Southwest offers 3 Mi million Spanish-speaking 

audience ... ^ 

New Hofstra study proves value of high-budget 
programing ... 

Public Service 

WCBS-TV offers "Course in Self-Preservation" 

"Telephone Hour" commercials stress public 

service aspects 

Publicitg ami Prontoti 

Auto makers step up air promotion 

Hadacol Xmas parties pack 'em in 

Bakers join in special air promotion 

New BAB promises expanded promotion ._ 

Tartan hitches promotion to AM/TV star 

Promotion ends at point-of-sale 

ASR uses radio star for promotion 

BMI program clinics promote sales 

Research 

McCann-Erickson starts with research 

New bibliography for ad managers 

Media effectiveness tested by Pittsburgh news- 
paper strike 

AAAA recommendations for simplifying re- 
search procedures 

Let's standardize TV data now l 

Is there a way out of the rating muddle? 

TV costs up, but cost-per-thousand down 
What sells your customer — sight or sound?.— 

How much is radio time worth? 

Nielsen's summer scts-in-use figures 

Out-of-home listening audience measured 

Cuban advertisers do their own research 
Are you floored l>v ir-ranli inumbo-jumbo? 
Research lacking on life of TV commercials... 

archers show TV ups sports attendance 
Italian-language market study shows high 
listener intensity 



New Rorabaugh report promises better spot 

4 June p. 28 radio info 4 June 

Research shows teachers willing to accept 

sponsored educational shows 18 June 

CBS study shows radio to be low cost, big 

impact, mass audience medium 18 June 

Affiliates Commiltee-ANA meeting discusses 

new research problems .. 18 June 

Hofstra Study No. 2 proves TV viewing con- 
sistent; high-rated shows bargain 18 June 

How obsolete is BMB? . ...... 18 June 

Retail 

Department stores missing big bet in radio 

advertising 26 Feb. 

Local retailers lick summer slump 9 Apr. 

Point-of-sale is the payoff __ 23 Apr. 

Soaps, Cleansers, Toilet Goods 

Procter & Gamble tackle daytime TV soap 

opera 29 Jan. 

E. M. Finehout, L.A. Soap Co., profile 26 Mar. 

Soap operas continue all summer 9 Apr. 

Rinso and Spry swing to hard-selling and drop 

glamour approach 21 May 

Television 

What are the unions doing to TV? 1 Jan. 

When is it safe to simulcast? 15 Jan. 

Daytime TV: facts and figures 29 Jan. 

Daytime TV's first soap opera _ 29 Jan. 

Daytime TV: spot programing 29 Jan. 

Daytime TV: network programing 29 Jan. 

Daytime TV: Time-on-air chart 29 Jan. 

Old Gold Dancing Pack TV commercials 12 Feb. 

Mohawk Carpet supplements TV show with 

radio version 12 Feb. 

Getting the most out of camera and props? ... 12 Feb. 

Soaring costs are terrific problem 26 Feb. 

Let's standardize TV data now .. ... 12 Mar. 

TV/radio campaign zooms sales of Hazel 

Bishop lipstick 12 Mar. 

TV costs up; cost-per-thousand down 26 Mar. 

Top network TV commercials ... 26 Mar. 

Educators' lobby after TV channels 26 Mar. 

Chicago writing outfit promises low-cost pro- 
ductions _ 9 Apr. 

TV is good summertime buy 9 Apr. 

Tops in spot TV commercials 23 Apr. 

"Range Rider" latest TV western film series.... 7 May 

How long does a TV commercial live? 7 May 

Telemension Syndicate offers money-saving 

process 21 May 

Does TV hurt Madison Square Garden's box 

office? 21 May 

Telestrip offers TV programers inexpensive 

previews 21 May 

Survey shows TV stimulates sports attendance 4 June 

TV Dictionary/handbook, A-C ..•. 4 June 

ABC-Paramount merger may mean new talent 

pool for TV 4 June 

Survey shows teachers approve sponsored edu- 
cational TV programs 18 June 

Color TV goes commercial .._„ 18 June 

Hollywood gets on TV bandwagon 18 June 

"Pay as you go" TV testing stepped up 18 June 

Hofstra Study No. 2 proves TV good value 18 June 

TV Dictionary/handbook, C-D _ 18 June 

Timebuying 

They're coming back to radio 15 Jan. 

How not to buy time 12 Mar. 

How much is radio time worth? .. 26 Mar. 

The saturation boys are back 9 Apr. 

Summer timebuying too often overlooked 9 Apr. 

Canada Dry buys heavy summer schedule 9 Apr. 

Philip Morris buys time on year-'round basis 9 Apr. 

Shall a station have two rate cards? . 23 Apr. 

Network rate cuts offer timebuyers good deal 7 May 

Tobacco 

Old Gold Dancing Pack TV commercials 12 Feb. 

Air strategy of Brown & Williamson .. 12 Feb. 

Philip Morris' Johnny works all summer .. 9 Apr. 

Tra ascriptions 

4 June p. 20 Music libraries attract host of sponsors _ 15 Jan. 



4 June 


P- 


34 


18 June 


!>• 


26 


1 Jan. 


P- 


10 


1 Jan. 


P- 


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15 Jan. 


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15 Jan. 


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29 Jan. 


P- 


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29 Jan. 


P- 


42 


&7 Jan. 


P- 


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29 Jan. 


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29 Jan. 


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12 Feb. 


P- 


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12 Feb. 


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26 Feb. 


P- 


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26 Mar. 


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26 Mar. 


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26 Mar. 


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9 Apr. 


P- 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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23 Apr. 


P- 


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7 May 


P- 


18 


7 May 


P. 


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21 May 


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21 May 


P- 


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21 May 


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21 May 


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4 June 


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4 June 


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12 Mar. 


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18 June 


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on 

1 Jan. 


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15 Jan. 


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26 Mar. 


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9 Apr. 


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9 Apr. 


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7 May 


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7 May 


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15 Jan 


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29 Jan. 


P- 


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29 Jan. 


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29 Jan. 


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12 Mar. 


P- 


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12 Mar. 


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26 Mar. 


P- 


20 


26 Mar. 


P- 


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26 Mar. 


P- 


34 


9 Apr. 


P- 


39 


9 Apr. 


P- 


54 


23 Apr. 


P- 


21 


7 May 


P- 


24 


7 Mav 


P- 


28 


21 May 


p. 


30 



P- 


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P- 


18 


P- 


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P- 


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P- 
P- 


30 

36 



p. 33 
p. 52 
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p. 38 

p. 12 

p. 60 

p. 28 



28 
21 



p. 34 
p. 38 



42 
44 
54 
21 



p. 21 

p. 32 

p. 30 

p. 26 



31 

20 



p. 30 

p. 32 

p. 34 

p. 58 

p. 38 

p. 18 

p. 28 

p. 22 

p. 30 

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p. 20 

p. 30 

p. 32 



19 
28 
29 
29 



p. 30 
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p. 34 
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p. 34 



42 
44 



p. 50 
p. 56 



36 
21 



p. 28 
p. 21 
p. 56 



32 



4 



SPONSOR 



ANUARY 1951 • 50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 




3^HQ 



What are unions 
iloing to Revision?— p. 28 



12220 



Be H^fliScKS 

i RocKcrcn-CR pi 

vy YORK 20 N V 





f 




/ E. Lee was a great campaigner 



Noble, brilliant, generous General Lee, who 
entered the war between the states as commander of 
Virginia troops, had many sterling qualities. 
Not the least of these was his imaginative 
planning. It took courage 
to execute daring campaigns, to do things a new 
way. This favorite son of Virginia 
would have enjoyed the pioneering that envisioned 
WTVR, first TV station of the south, 
many years ago; publicly predicted 
it in 1944; put it on the air 

in 1948. Today WTVR is still 
Richmond's only TV station, occupies a big spot 
in the hearts and lives of all Richmond. 



X 




Statue of Robert E. Lee 



Havens & Martin Stations ore the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond 

W M B G *m WCOD 

Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market 

Represented nationally by 

John Blair & Company 




WTVRvi 



.-/-* 



'on s o' 




KEEP AN EYE ON FM IN 7957 — Looks like FM, which has been grappling for a com- 
mercial foothold, will attract sponsor attention (and dollars) in 1951. Big rea- 
sons are: (1) slowly but surely, FM homes have been climbing to point where spon- 
sors are getting interested; (2) AM reception interference factors causing both 
listeners and broadcasters to lean in FM direction; (3) networks evincing inter- 
est in FM (CBS recently made first exclusive affiliation dealer with FMer in 
Rocky Mount, N. C. ) ; (4) first big FM purchase, $250,000 campaign, may break 
early in year beamed at specialized audience. Little known fact is that number of 
licensed FM outlets steadily mounting. Of 677 FMers on air Dec. 1950, 519 were 
fully licensed. Key to FM success is stepped up production. 

BELTONE STUDY RATES NIGHTTIME RADIO HIGH— Just completed analysis of 15,000 
inquiries from MBS (Gabriel Heatter) listeners for information about Beltone 
(hearing aid) showed cost-per-inquiry from TV areas to be about same as non-TV 
areas. Program is broadcast over 124 stations at 7:30 p.m. Olian Adv. Co., Chi- 
cago agency handling campaign, said: "Check convinced us that nighttime radio in 
TV areas is very strong." 

WHO KNOWS HOW TO PRICE RADIO? — Survey by SPONSOR indicates that root of radio 
rate dilemma is lack of knowledge on dimensions of medium. Accurate studies of 
in-home, personal-set listening, and out-of-home listening still in infancy. 
Second reason for downgrading of radio is lack of machinery within medium to ad- 
vance its cause positively with advertisers and general public. 

TV IN 7957 — TV will continue with 107 stations, roughly 150 network advertisers, 
and special emphasis on daytime programing during new year. Biggest opportunity 
for national and regional advertisers is during morning and afternoon brackets; 
night periods are either sold out or hard to clear. TV homes will not skyrocket 
as in 1950 (though increases will be high) because TV set production will be down. 
Manufacturers like DuMont are gearing to contribute heavily to national emer- 
gency effort. 

WCY, SCHENECTADY, BUILDS 4-MAN MERCHANDISING DEPARTMENT — Added to ranks of 
top merchandising-minded stations like WWL, KSTP, WLW, WSAI, WOV, KMBC, KFI is 
WGY. Bob Hanna, general manager, recently dispatched Bill Givens, promotion man- 
ager, to WLW to analyze merchandising techniques. As result, 4-man department 
under Givens now being considered to serve radio and TV clients of G.E. stations. 



SPONSOR. Volume 5, No. 1, 1 January 1951. Published biweekly i» SPONSOR Publications Inc., at :tllu Elm Aw., Hal re Md I ■ i I Irculatlon Office 

510 Madison Ave.. X?v York 21. JS a year in U. s. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter -".' January 1949 al Baltimore, Md postofflce under \ Mai h 1879 






REPORT TO SPONSORS for 1 January 1951 

CRAUER AGAIN VOICE OF JERGEN'S — Two years after Jergen's and Winchell, with 
Ben Grauer as announcer, parted company, Grauer is again selling for hand-lotion 
firm. Program is Kate Smith on NBC-TV, with Grauer narrating for film commer- 
cials. Jergen's has bought two 15-minute segments on now sold-out daytime show. 
Grauer had been voice of Jergen's for 16 years, a record for continuous associa- 
tion of announcer, product, show (see Grauer's 20 years with sponsors, page 24). 

TV NETS SETTLE ALLOCATION CONTROVERSY — An ingenious allocation of intercity 
television circuits between DuMont , ABC, CBS, and NBC has been agreed on by rep- 
resentatives of the networks, AT&T, and the FCC. The 13 existing circuits have 
been divided 4 ways; a rotating schedule has been arranged showing order, for 
each time period, in which each net may exercise choice of one of 4 groups. 
Lawyers connected with networks understood to be largely responsible for amicable 
and equitable settlement of difficult problem. 

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT SHOW SYNDICATED STARTING 15 IANUARY —mAM, Cleveland, is 
first station to pick up Eleanor Roosevelt WNBC program on syndicated basis, with 
first airing slated 15 January. WMAQ, Chicago, and WRC, Washington, start se- 
ries shortly thereafter. Efforts being made to clear KOA, Denver, and KNBC, San 
Francisco. Program, featuring Mrs. Roosevelt interviews with notable, will be 
offered other stations. Participation advertisers will be aided by unique con- 
cept of tieing in local announcers who will voice questions live (from script) 
that Mrs. Roosevelt answers on tape. Taping of shows permits all cities to air 
on same day. 

TV FILMS HEAVY IN 1950 — Over 6,500 hours of TV programing was film-recorded by 
4 nets in 1950, mostly off the tube. NBC recorded 2,000 hours; ABC 1,900; CBS, 
1,750; DuMont 850. 

HOW MUCH DID A&P AD CAMPAIGN AI D BIG BUSINESS? — Psychological Corp. reports 
that October 1950 survey, in contrast to one made November 1948, shows that public 
has shifted from big business to big labor unions as "most dangerous monopoly." 
Two years ago labor unions were considered "most dangerous" by 25%; now by 34%. 
Big companies, high with 27% in 1948 study, dropped to 17%. Psychological Corp. 
believes that big business advertising campaigns, notably A&P effort defending 
itself against government anti-trust charges, may have made the difference. 

PHONEVISION BEGINS C HICAGO TEST — Beginning New Years Day for 30-day test period 
authorized by FCC, 300 Chicago families will have daily option of "buying admis- 
sion" to top-flight Hollywood and European films at a home admission fee of $1 
per picture. Test will show how often typical families will pay $1 for privilege 
of viewing Phonevision ; degree of satisfaction. 

(Please turn to page 42) 



SPONSOR 



NO. 19 OF A SERIES 



GEORGE SISLER 

In Hits per Season,- 

WHEC 

In Rochester 




"^« Ts Sfn h"oo. 
Rochester ha ^ H£C leads 



id! 



Pf^r^.' afternoon 



an< 



morning, 
,ning by - 



ide margins. 



5 ? 7 ,-£ 3?&; 



In 1920 Sisler, playing for the St. Louis 
Browns, made 257 hits. George Sisler's 
amazing vv hits per season" record has 
never been topped since! 

In 1943 Rochester's first Hooperating 
reported the decided WHEC listener pre- 
ference. This station's Hooperatings have 
never been topped since! 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



1 JANUARY 1951 




/n\ 



VU/il 




DIGEST OF 1 JANUARY 1951 ISSUE 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER I 



ARTICLES 



What year do we shift to note? 

Automobile ad plans subject to change as Detroit rocks with crisis after 

crisis. At moment, TV, heavy spot radio are major factors »-* 



America's Pled Piper 

Dozens of firms were licensed to sell new rat killer, Warfarin. One alone 

hit jackpot — by using radio boldly, $40,000 per week on 400 stations *** 



Ben firauer: My twenty years with sponsors 

After selling over 200 products, Grauer ought to know how effective 
commercials are put together. You will find his thinking here »© 



I* hut are the anions doing to television? 

In easy-to-get-at capsule form, SPONSOR has compiled a status report 
on the leading TV unions. Includes figures on how much new union rates 
will cost sponsors for various types of programing <»o 



Only small in numbers 

That's way to describe Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield's radio-TV depart- 

ment. SPONSOR explores DCS operating methods, advertising philosophy 5U 



COMING 



Music libraries 

Last article in SPONSOR'S series on spot programing tells of prominent 

part music library services play on local scene •*«* «FMM. 

Cantly manufitcturers on the air 

How and to what extent do they make use of the broadcast media to sell __ _ 
their sweets? A SPONSOR roundup complete with strategy, case histories *** <""*• 



Alka Seltzer: 2© years of air success 

SPONSOR is looking into Miles Laboratories' broadcast advertising 
philosophy which has helped make Alka Seltzer a household word 



15 .tail. 



The next issue of SPONSOR will come to you in a new, slightly larger format, making for 
increased readability. This is the first major change in format sine? SPONSOR went biweekly. 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

P. S. 

MR. SPONSOR: STEWART BOYD 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUNDUP 

TV RESULTS 

QUERIES 

TOOLS (BROCHURES) AVAILABLE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



6 
10 
12 
15 
34 
36 
38 
43 
63 
64 




COVER: Ben Grauer has sold for over 200 
sponsors during his 20 years in radio, been 
in many interesting situations. Situation on 
cover, while Grauer was on Chesterfield "Sup- 
per Club," was bound to be interesting due to 
presence of Lizabeth Scott (see story, p. 26). 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Erik H. Arctander 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Kay Brown (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast 
Manager), George Weiss (Southern Rep- 
resentative), John A. Kovchok (Production 
Manager), Edna Yergin, Douglas Graham 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Safz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villanti 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave., New York 22. 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill S-2772. Chicago Office: 
3i;0 N. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 6-1556. 
Weal Coast Office: COST Sunset Boulevard. Los AngeleB. 
Telephone: lllllside 8311. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 8t»Ui 
$8 a vear, Canada and foreign 19. Single copies 50c 
Printed In ' >. S Vddress all correspondence m MO 
Madison Avenue, New Fork 22, N. V. Copyright 1951. 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 




KG W THE ONLY STATION 
WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



in the OREGON, 



cxmsi 





BROADCAST MEASUREMENT 
BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSHIP 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's efficient 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area and 
reaches more radio families than any other Portland 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys bear 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the population 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and South- 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
(From 1949 BMB Survey) 



For a full century Hillsboro, Oregon, has been a major producing, 
marketing and processing center. Today foods packed by Hills- 
boro plants are consumed throughout the world. A recent KGW 
Tour-Test, conducted with the cooperation of the Oregon State 
Motor Association, proved KGW's dominance of this market. 
Haley Canning Company, one of the city's major packing plants, 
was visited by the Tour-Test. Above William Christensen (left) 
Hillsboro business figure, and Bill Watkins, Haley's president, 
examine with "Miss KGW" canned meat products destined for 
the U. S. armed services. Hillsboro's expanding economy is de- 
livered through the COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE of KGW. 





DAYTIME 

KGW 350,030 

Station B 337,330 

Station C 295,470 

Station D 192,630 

NIGHTTIME 

KGW 367,370 

Station B 350,820 

Station C 307,970 

Station D 205,440 



This chart, compiled from offi- 
cial, half-milivolt contour maps 
filed with the FCC in Washing 
ton. DC. or from field intensity 
surveys, tells the story of KGW's 
COMPREHENSIVE COVER- 
ACE of the fastest-growing mar- 
the nation. 



PORTLAND, OREGON 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO, 



1 JANUARY 1951 



BETWEEN .,: 
COMMERCIALS 



BY 

KAY 

MULVIHILL 



KPIX, San Francisco's Pio- 
neer Television Station, re- 
cently celebrated its second 
anniversary. The two years 
since KPIX introduced TV 
to the Bay Area have moved as rapidly 
in pace as in progress. Under the able 
guidance of Northern California's first 
men of television — Wesley I. Dumm and 
Philip G. Lasky — they have been two 
years of continual expansion and im- 
provement in facilities, personnel, op- 
erating techniques and programming. 
Two years in which television has been 
developed from a magic word to an in- 
tegral part of the community's life. 

When KPIX took to the air in Decern- 
her, 1948, there were 3500 sets in the 
Bay Area. Programming was scheduled 
six days a week, with 17 hours of tele- 
casting. 

Today, KPIX operates on a seven-day- 
week schedule, sending our 65 hours of 
programming to over 120,000 television 
homes. 

These notable increases have meant an 
impressive list of television firsts and 
programming events for KPIX. The pio- 
neer station's contributions to San Fran- 
cisco television were recognized within 
the industry last year, when KPIX re- 
ceived the Academy of TV Arts and Sci- 
ences top award for outstanding station 
achievement. 

KPIX's ever-increasing hours of pro- 
gramming include the top offerings of 
the CBS and Dumont networks, in addi- 
tion to approximately 30 hours a week of 
local productions. Sports also rate high 
and during the past year have included 
UC Football Games and the Rose Bowl 
Game and Parade, via micro wave. 

One of KPIX's most outstanding cam- 
paigns in the public interest was the re- 
cent "TV Sets for Vets" drive, results 
from which bought a great number of 
TV sets for wounded war veterans in 
Bay Area hospitals. 

KPIX looks forward to its third year 
with a sense of pride and achievement 
for the past and even greater expectations 
for the future. 



■ < T71 


CHANNEL . 1 

r 1 


^■HlH 


Represented by The Kali Agency, Inc. 

560 !■ ^k. 

Represented by Wm. G. Rambeau Co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



For a long time now the big news of television has been success, 
and more success. Almost anybody within scoring position racked 
up points. The manufacturers enjoyed a boom. Broadcasters, or 
some of them, pulled away from deficit operations, neared the happy 
day of profit. More advertisers were spending more money. As for 
TV's impact upon the public and show business, it was the greatest 
thing, not since talking movies, but since Shakespeare. 

Obviously, a medium capable of influencing our environment at 
every turn draws sooner or later the skeptical and anxious concern 
of educators, legislators, and social critics. Hence the current whoop- 
dedo about fencing in the remaining range so that education shall 
have grazing rights. 

* * * 

None of this is remote from private management or advertising, 
for the future character of American video is at stake. The most 
constructive approach to the problem at the moment is the NBC-TV 
plan. "Operation Frontal Lobes." NBC proposes to produce a series 
of "artistic" and "cultural" telecasts, scattering these through prime 
evening time on the basis of one preemption per sponsor per season 
of 44 weeks. As a token of serious intent, Pat Weaver has taken on a 
new colleague, Davidson Taylor, an ex-CBS program vice president. 

* * * 

Here it may be provocative to recall that in his play about the 
Salvation Army, "Major Barbara," George Bernard Shaw advanced 
the thesis that to get any big social change efficiently managed it is 
desirable to engage the enthusiasm of a multi-millionaire before 
whose wealth and energy bad conditions can magically become good 
conditions. "Operation Frontal Lobes" represents the applied wealth 
and energy of one network. It is. we suggest, a portent of the ut- 
most significance. 

* * * 

Just where education would get the money to operate television 
stations, if granted licenses, is not clear. Nor does education's rec- 
ord in radio inspire confidence. Back in the 1920's some 175 AM 
stations were licensed to educational institutions of all sorts. Indeed 
the electrical engineering schools had been bona fide radio pioneers. 
But within 10 years the 175 stations had shrunken down to around 
30. These were the best, and numbered among them today are the 
highly commendable radio stations of Wisconsin. Minnesota, Drake. 
Cornell, Iowa State, Ohio State, Texas, Alabama. 

* * * 

Put it this way. Educators are not by nature, interest, or pro- 
fessional training likely to compete in the market places of enter- 
tainment ideas. True, much progress has been made in classroom 
use of FM in Chicago, Cleveland, and elsewhere. But the fact about 
educators having other fish to fry is clear. Add to this their per- 
petual prowl for funds with which to raise their own salaries, build 

1 1 'I case turn to page 40 I 



SPONSOR 



OF I series mri him; the men who make FREE & PETERS TELEVISION SERVICE 



} 



Heads up, 
boys, it's- 




Four yrars. University of Illinois 

Two years, U. S. Army (Purple 
Heart, Silver Star) 

Twenty-two years. National Broad- 
casting Company 

Free & Peters, Inc. (New York 
Office) since Dec., 1950 



I. E. Showerman! 

(Another F&P TELEVISION Specialist) 



Yes, "heads up" is the phrase for Chick 
Showerman. As you undoubtedly know, 
he's been heading up a lot of things, for 
years — including the Central Division 
of NBC, as Vice President In Charge 
(recently piloting this Division's tele- 
vision sales to an outstanding level in 
the industry). Now Chick has joined 
F&P, to head up our rapidly-growing 
television sales and to help keep us 
heads (and shoulders) up on National 
Spot Television. 

Big man though he is, however, Chick 
Showerman is by no means the only 
great performer in our team of TV 



specialists. For years we've been build- 
ing a complete line and backfield of 
skill and experience in this new and 
exciting medium — have long since de- 
veloped a TV squad that's of strictly 
championship quality. . . . 

We of Free & Peters are entirely con- 
vinced that "good men are the secret of 
success." Ever since our company's 
founding in 1932, we have considered 
it a big part of our job to discover, 
develop and acquire good men. We 
know you can see the results, here in 
this pioneer group of radio and tele- 
vision station representatives. 



EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL 

TELEVISION 

REPRESENTATIVES 

DAVENPORT WOC-TV* 

(Central Broadcasting Co. — 
WHO-WOC) 

FORT WORTH-DALLAS WBAP-TV* 

(STAR-TELEGRAM) 

LOUISVILLE WAVE-TV* 

(WAVE, Inc.) 

MIAMI WTVJ 

(Wometco Theatres) 

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL WTCN-TV 

(DISPATCH-PIONEER PRESS) 

NEW YORK WPIX 

(THE NEWS) 

ST. LOUIS KSD-TV* 

(POST-DISPATCH) 

SAN FRANCISCO KRON-TV* 

(THE CHRONICLE) 



*Primary NBC Affiliates 




Free & Peters, inc. 

Pioneer Radio and Television Station Representatives Since 1932 

IW YORK CHICAGO ATLANTA DETROIT FT. WORTH HOLLYWOOD SAN FRANCISCO 

1 JANUARY 1951 7 











"KCMO's most salable property is NEWS! 
We have 13 local newscasts daily be- 
sides our network news. One sponsor has 
been with us for ten years, another for 
six. Associated Press service enables us 
to air complete coverage." 

E. K. HARTENBOWER, Gen. Manager, 
KCMO, Kansas City, Mo. 




"Listeners are more interested in 
than any other feature. Our adverl 
have been quick to toke odvontc <] 
this interest. Our AP reports are :| 
dispensable part of our operatior. 

DANIEL W. KOPS, Vice Preside! 
WAVZ, New Haven, Conn. 




"Our Associated Press news programs 
have had some of the highest ratings in 
all New England for many years. AP is 
used by WTAG exclusively. The public 
places implicit confidence in AP." 

E. E. HILL, Executive Vice President, 
WTAG, Worcester, Mass. 




"Scott's market has had the same scl 
ule of five-minute Associated Press il 
far nearly two years. Mr. Scott tel!| 
the program has done a terrific job] 
his business." 

JOHN W. WATKINS, Manager, 
WBBQ, Augusta, Ga. 



coast to coast . . . AP broadcas 





"The sale of Associated Press newscasts 
has been consistently successful for 
WWDC." 

BEN STROUSE, General Manager, 
WWDC, Washington, D. C. 



"Twenty-eight out of 30 daytime news- 
casts are sold . . . spot adjacencies are 
all sold . . . due to the practically im- 
mediate salability of Associated Press 
news programs." 

PAUL R. FRY, Genera/ Manager, 
KBON, Omaha, Neb. 



"Sixteen Associated Press features 
used daily on KOOS. They include si 
news broadcasts, women's features, i 
rine news, commentaries, home econorl 
programs and others. Associated Pr 
features are easy to sell and stay . 
to satisfied customers." 




"In addition to our network news, 
produce four 15-minute, two 10-minu 
and two 5-minute AP news and spoi 
programs of our own daily. These a 
100 per cent sponsored. Our 5:30 p. 
'Standard Oil Reporter' is especial 
popular." 

HOWARD E. PILL, President, 
WSFA, Montgomery, Ala. 






Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride . 



THIS STATION IS 




"Our sponsors say news is the best buy 
on KOCY. 1950 is the tenth year for 
Mid-Continent Petroleum's sponsorship. 
Another news sponsor has been with us 
seven years. AP news provides steady 
income for KOCY. The Associated Press 
means the best possible service." 

MATT BONEBRAKE, Gen. Manager. 
KOCY, Oklahoma City, Oklo. 





-*> m 



"We carry 26 sponsored 15-minute AP 
programs weekly Our oldest sponsor, 
De Roy's jewelry store, has just renewed 
its contract for the 6 p.m. news. They 
have been buying this spot continuously 
since 1939." 

JOHN P. FOSTER, Manager, 
WJAC, Johnstown, Pa. 




"Our success in broadcasting is due 
largely to the sale of Associated Press 
newscasts." 

BOB EVANS, Manager, 
WELO, Tupelo, Miss. 







"WFMJ is now carrying 71 sponsored 
AP news programs weekly, totaling 690 
minutes." 

WILLIAM F. MAAG, JR., President, 
WFMJ, Youngstown, Ohio 





EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. 



Y ou need no gimmicks or give- 
aways to draw listeners to 
Associated Press news. 
The raw drama of life rivets 
attention on today's newscasts. 
That's why more than ever, 
people turn to 
The Associated Press, 
oldest and largest 
of all news agencies, 
for impartial, accurate, 
swift news reporting. 

If you are a station 

not using AP news . . . 

if you are a station that 

can qualify for 

Associated Press membership . . . 

join the one news association 

that charges each member 

only its exact share of 

the cost of 

providing service. 

Associated Press 
resources and facilities 
include: 

A news report of 

'1,000,000 words every 

24 hours. 

A staff of 7200 

augmented by 

staffs of member 

stations and newspapers 

—more than 100,000 men 

and women contributing to 

each day's report. 

Leased news wires of 
350,000 miles in the U. S. alone. 

The only state-by-state news 
circuits in existence. 

1 00 news bureaus in the U. S. — 

offices and news 

men around the world. 

A complete, nationwide 

election service, employing 

65,000 special workers. 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, WRITE 

RADIO DIVISION 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

50 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 



.Yeic developments on SPO\SOR stories 



new stars 
in the 
south! . . . 




MONLE, ALABAMA 

on the 

favorable 

jiofrgquency 




national representative 

ADAM J. YOUNG, JR. INC. 

D.AL710 





s Bob De Haven is typical of station personalities who g've spo-sor plus 



T> 



11 o 



SEE: 

ISSUE: 

SUBJECT: 



"Local shows" 

18 December 1950, p. 21 

Spot programing 



Here? further proof of the plusses for sponsors of local live pro- 
grams. 

Factual responses to sponsor inquiries received too late for "Local 
shows'" 1 18 December issue i . help show why local shows ring the 
national sponsors cash register. 

Success of local programs often is keyed to distinctive person- 
alities. Most famous name on the WCCO. Minneapolis, roster is 
Cedric Adams. Although he has sky-rocketed into national promi- 
nence via his Pillsbury CBS network show, he has maintained local 
and regional popularity with 14 news broadcasts and three half-hour 
evening programs each weeL Friday Night Radio Party. 90-minute 
local production, stars Adams and Bob DeHaven. has played before 
packed houses of 600 people weekly. Bob DeHaven. who co-emcee's 
\ el's Qui: of the Turin Cities, often broadcasts his own shows from 
sponsors" stores, has built up a tremendous personal following. 

Others, like Cecil Solly on KIRO. Seattle, sponsored by Olvmpia 
Brewing Company, have attained loyal followings through informa- 
tional programing. Solly has become a Pacific Northwest institution 
because of his home gardening know-how. He is a professional hor- 
ticulturist who has learned to talk the language of the man who has 
just planted a row of onions and wonders when they "11 start to grow. 
His Garden Shoic's mail averages 50,000 pieces yearly. 

KMBC. Kansas City, boasts veteran newscaster Erie Smith as one 
of its personalities with a large local following. Phillips Petroleum 
Company has sponsored Smith's 9:30 p.m. weekday newscast for 12 
consecutive years: the Studebaker Corporation has been sponsor for 
the past eight years. Smith has become one of the news authorities 
in the Kansas City area. So has Clyde Hess. WTAG news analyst in 
the Worcester. Mass.. area. ■ He's also sponsored by Studebaker. | 
Hess is well known around the community for civic work he has 
done. Last year he presented a public-education series that netted 
the station a regional Peabody award. Frequently. Hess gets out 
and interviews both important and little known people of the area. 

^X DIA. Memphis, chose local Negro personalities who were al- 
ready successful in other fields, to promote national accounts among 
• Please turn to page 



10 



SPONSOR 



38.8% MORE 

'SPOT 9 ADVERTISERS 
DOUGHT TIME ON KSD 

IN NOVEMBER, 1950 

THAN IX NOVEMBER. 1949 



KSD's Spot Announcement and 

Studio Program Periods Are 

Valuable Advertising Properties! 

For rates and availabilities, call or write 



KSD 



THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH RADIO STATION 

5000 WATTS ON 550 KC DAY AND NIGHT 

National Advertising Representative: FREE & PETERS, INC. 

1 JANUARY 1951 11 



CASH FARM INCOME 

for WGTM'S 

29-COUNTY 
COVERAGE AREA 
IS BIGGER THAN 
ANY ONE OF 27 
OTHER ENTIRE 
STATES. 



WRITE TODAY FOR 

'Time Buyers 
Market and 
Coverage Data" 

... a new, factual data 
folder on one of the 
Nation's richest 
Agricultural regions. 



WRITE, 'PHONE OR WIRE 



WGTM 



5,000 WATTS • CBS AFFILIATE 

WILSON, N. C. 

ALLEN WANNAMAKER, 

Gcn'l Mgr. 

WEED & CO., Nat'l Rep. 




3/r. Sponsor 



R. Stewart Boyd 

Advertising manager, cereals and dog foods products 
National Biscuit Company, New York 



R. Stewart Boyd is an unsung hero to millions of American chil- 
dren . . . and clogs. 

The 42-year-old advertising manager, cereals and dog foods prod- 
ucts division, National Biscuit Company, is the man behind the 
popular kids' show. Straight Arrow, for Shredded Wheat. He also 
is the man who gets Fido's owners to buy Nabisco's Milk-Bone. 

Boyd handles all advertising for these two prominent members 
of the large Nabisco family. 

Last year the National Biscuit Company spent about $6,000,000 
for advertising. Radio and TV, with their share of this ad budget 
at nearly $3,000,000. accounted for a large part of the company's 
$294,000,000 sales volume. Arthur Godfrey alone costs them 
$1,000,000 to plug a variety of Nabisco products over CBS. 

Boyd spends $500,000 a year for Straight Arrow, a half-hour show 
heard over 450 Mutual stations three times a week. The company 
currently is thinking about extending the show to Canada. 

Since Straight Arrow, designed to sell shredded wheat, is strictly 
a kids' show. Boyd promotes it with plenty of premium oilers, has 
run the gamut from a simple metal ring to a bracelet with a large 
"secret compartment." 

"We are very fortunate in having a good selling vehicle directed 
to children on which we may offer our premiums," said Boyd, dis- 
cussing the policies while sitting in the large open advertising offices 
of the company. "Every one of our premiums that a child wears 
or carries is a walking advertisement for Nabisco Shredded Wheat. 
That advertisement has got to be good." 

Another $200,000 goes into radio to advertise Milk-Bone. This is 
largely spent on radio participations over 19 stations in 12 states, 
and on one TV participation. 

"We plan to maintain a similar broadcast media schedule during 
L951, and ma\ add to it." said Boyd, who has been in the food busi- 
ness since 1935. 

After he had attended Wesleyan University, Boyd went to work 
in 1935 lor General Foods in Cleveland as a retail truck salesman. 
He later became the company's radio promotion manager. He joined 
Nabisco in 1947 as assistant advertising manager, was made adver- 
tising manager in l ( ' 1'). 



12 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 

He's the nation's Greatest Salesman 

...Say 59 advertisers 

Jack the Bellboy, America's greatest disc jockey, 
began his own record program five years ago 
on WJBK with a modest one-hour daily ses- 
sion. Shortly afterward, to accommodate 
the growing number of sponsors, this 

was increased to two 
hours a day. Now, he's 
heard 28 hours a week, with 
a total of 59 sponsors. Adver- 
tisers, overjoyed with the phenom- 
enal selling job he's doing for them, 
/call Jack the Bellboy "The Nation's 
Greatest Salesman". 

Such extravagant and candid praise 
could only come from sponsors 
whose sales success in Detroit over 
WJBK is unprecedented anywhere 
by any medium. In 1950 alone, 
sponsors had spent a half-million 
dollars for Jack the Bellboy to adver- 
tise their products on WJBK. Why 
this success? He's just a GREAT 
SALESMAN— that's All! Alert pro- 
gramming, with the best in music, 
talent and entertainment, accounts 
for the terrific sales response of 
WJBK's loyal listening audience. Our 
files are bulging with letters from 
advertisers, happy with WJBK's sales 
results. Check with your KATZ man for 
the answer to your selling problems in Detroit. 
He'll show you how WJBK can help your sales 
curve upward. 





WJBK 



-AM 

-FM 

-TV 



DETROIT 



The Station with a Million Friends 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, ELDORADO 3-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

1 JANUARY 1951 13 



the yyf^l National Barn Dance welcomes i 



t! 



2 millionth 
PAID visitor! 



Greeting our 2 millionth WLS National 
Barn Dance Visitor— Mrs. Joe Vander- 
vliet of St. Anne's, Illinois. (L.-R.) daugh- 
ter Sharon; Barn Dance star. Lulu Belle; 
Mr. Vandervliet; Mrs. Vandervliet; WLS 
Program Director, Harold Safford; and 
daughter Sandra. 





N November 1 1, 1950, Mrs. Joseph Vandervliet purchased the 2 millionth admis- 
sion ticket to the original WLS National Barn Dance, radio's first real Barn Dance. 
Yes, 2,000,000 people have paid to see this nationally known Saturday night par- 
ade of WLS stars. 



April 19, 1924, crystal set listeners heard 
something new over their earphones ... it 
was a Barn Dance . . . the WLS National 
Barn Dance! Then, everyone wanted to see 
the broadcast. Crowds increased weekly by 
hundreds, and admission had to be limited 
to invited guests only. Still they came, until 
in March 1932, it was decided to broadcast 
the show from Chicago's Eighth Street 
Theatre — and charge admission. In the 18 
years since, 2 million people have paid to 
see the WLS National Barn Dance broad- 
cast. Now in its 27th year of broadcast, we 
believe the WLS National Barn Dance to 
be radio's oldest continuous commercial 
program. 



Evidence that the WLS National Barn 
Dance has maintained its interest is found 
in the impressive list of long time sponsors : 
Murphy Products Company, 14 consecutive 
years; Keystone Steel and Wire Company, 
18 consecutive years; Warp Brothers, 13 
consecutive years; Phillips Petroleum, 6 
consecutive years . . . and now Pequot Mills 
has been added. They know the WLS Na- 
tional Barn Dance is a sure way to reach 
Midwest America — that's why the show's 
share-of-audience has inreased 49% in the 
last year . . . further, why an average of 
264,366 radio families listen to each half- 
hour portion of it! 

Source: A. C. Nielsen, Chicago Area Reports 



For information on Barn Dance availabilities — and 
details on how this program can help you, contact 
your John Blair man, or call WLS. 



CLEAR CHANNEL Home of the NATIONAL Barn Dance 



14 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. REPRESENTED BY \ JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 



SPONSOR 




New and r 



These reports appear in alternate issues 




New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Brown Shoe Co 


Leo Burnett 


NBC -TV 


21 


General Mills Inc 


Knox Reeves 


CBS-TV 




General Motors Corp 


Gampbell-Ewald 


CBS-TV 




(Chevrolet div) 








Gibson Refrigerator Co 


W. W. Garrison 


CBS -TV 




Hudson Pulp & Paper 


Duane Jones 


CBS-TV 




Corp 








Hunt Foods Inc 


Young & Rublcam 


NBC-TV 




Kellogg Co 


Kenvon & Eckhardt 


ABC-TV 




National Dairy Products 


N. W. Ayer 


CBS-TV 




Corp 








Norwich Pharmacal Co 


Benton & Bowles 


CBS-TV 




Pepsi-Cola Co 


Biow 


ABC-TV 


44 


Procter & Gamble Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


NBC-TV 




Quaker Oats Co 


Sherman & Marquette 


NBC-TV 


41 


Schenley Industries Inc 


Biow 


ABC-TV 


5 



Say It With Acting ; alt Sat 6:30-7 pm; 6 Jan; 52 wks 

Unnamed; ah F 9:30-10 pm; 20 Dec 

Challenge of the SO's; M 1:30-2:30 pm ; 1 Jan (one-time) 

Laura Gibson Show; Sat 7:30-15 pm; 20 Jan 
Bride and Groom; Th 3-3: IS pm ; 25 Jan; 52 wits 



Kate Smith Hour; M-F 4:45-5 pm ; 1 Jan 

Tom Corbett, Space Cadet; M, W. F 6:30-45 pm ; 

Big Top; Sat 12-1 pm ; 27 Jan; 52 »l, 



1 Jan; 52 wks 



Week in Review; Sun 11-11:15 pm; 14 Jan; 52 wks 
Faye Emerson Show; M, W, F, 6:15-30 pm ; 

25 Dec; 52 wks 
Kate Smith Hour; M-F 4-4:15 pm; 1 Jan 

Gabby Hayes Show; M, W, F 5:15-5:30 pm; 11 Dec; 29 wks 
Unnamed; M-F 7-7:05 pm ; 18 Dec; 13 wks 



Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Anheuser-Busch Inc 


D*Arcy 






CBS-TV 




Hudson Motor Car Co 


Brooke, Smith, French 
ranee Inc 


a 


Dor- 


ABC-TV 


61 


lronrite Inc 


Brooke, Smith, French 
ranee Inc 


& 


Dor- 


ABC-TV 


15 


Kaiser-Frazer Corp 


Wm. Weintraub 






DuMont 




Kraft Foods Co 


J. Walter Thompson 






NBC-TV 


40 


Lever Brothers Co 


Young & Rubicam 






CBS-TV 




(Thomas J. Lip ton div) 












Pharma-Craf t Corp ; 


RuthraufT & Ryan 






ABC-TV 


32 


American Safety Razor 












Corp (co-sponsor*) 












Phllco Corp 


Hutchins 






ABC -TV 


41 


Procter & Gamble Co 


Compton 






NBC-TV 


31 


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 


William Esly 






CBS-TV 




Co 












Ronson Art Metal Works 


Grey 






ABC-TV 


11 


Inc 












Wander Co 


Grant 






NBC-TV 


39 



Ken Murray Show; Sat 8-9 pm; 6 Jan; 52 wks 
Billy Rose Show; T 8-8:30 pm; 3 Dec; 52 wks 

Hollywood Screen Test; M 7:30-8 pm ; 1 Jan; 39 wks 

Adventures of Ellery Queen; Th 9-9:30 pm; 14 Dec; 13 wks 

Kraft Television Theatre; W O-IO pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 

Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts; M 8:30-9 pm ; 1 Jan; 52 wks 

College Bowl; 9-9:30 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 



Don McNeill's TV Club; W 9-10 ;>m; 20 Dec; 52 wks 
Fireside Theatre; I 9-9:30 pm ; 2 Jan; 52 wks 
Vaughn Monroe Show; T 9-9:30 nm ; 9 Jan; 52 wks 

Twenty Questions; F 8-8:30 pm; 29 Dec; 52 wks 

Howdy Doody Show; F 5:45-6 pm ; 26 wks 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



WHIM, Providence 



Independent 



Headley-Reed Co, N.Y. 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, New National Spot Radio Rusiness, 
National Rroadcast Sales Executive Changes, Sponsor Personnel Changes, 

New Agencg Appointments 



New and Renewed Spot Television 



IVeir and renew 1 Jannaru 1951 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



I hi . ,.,.,k, & Potomac T. 

phone Companies 
('lurk Candy Co 
Clark Candy Co 
Clark Candy Co 
Clu.it. Peabo.lv & Co Inc 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Inc 
Curtis Circulation Co 
Emwson Druf: Co 
Henry Heidi Inc 
Ilubei Itakin ■ Co 
P. Lorillard Co 
Philip Morris & Co 
Philip Morris & Co 
C. F. Mueller Co 
National Sugar Refining Co 
National Sugar Refining Co 
National Sugar Refining Co 
Ronson Art Metal Works In< 



I! Art Metal VS. 

Ronson Art Metal Wn 
Ronson Art Metal * . 
Tasty Toothpaste Co 
Trico Products Corp 
Trico Product* Corp 
Trico Products Corp 



Hit DO 




KUDO 




BBDO 




Young 


A Hill. H-,1 III 


Ted Kates 


KRDO 




BBDO 




Kelly, 


N a so n 


Qualit; 


Bakers of America 


Linnen & Mitchell 


Blow 




Blow 




Duane 


Jones 


Young 


& Rubicam 


Young 


& It ill. i. ,1111 


Young 


& Riihicain 


Grey 




Grey 




Grey 




Grey 




Vie tor 


van tier Linde 


Baldwi 


ii. Bowers & Straehan 


Baldwi 


n. Bowers & Strarhan 


Baldwi 


n. Bowers & Straehan 



WNBW. Wash. 

WCAU-TV. Phila. 
KTTV, L. A. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
KTTV, L. A. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
WNBT, N.Y. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
WNBQ, Chi. 
WPTZ, Phila. 
WCBS-TV. N.Y. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBQ, Chi. 
WCBS-TV. N.Y. 
WNBW, Wash. 
WTOP-TV, Wash. 
WTOP-TV, Wash. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
WAFM-TV, Birm. 
WTOP-TV, Wash. 
KTTV, L. A. 
WCBS-TV, N. V. 
WCAU-TV. Phila. 
W'BTV, Charlotte 
WAFM-TV. Bin... 



I -11 



it; 1 Jan; 52 wks (r) 



1-iuin .inn. nil; 22 Dec: 26 wks (r) 

1-inin .inn. mi 25 Dec; 26 wks (r) 

1-niin anncmt ; 3(1 Jan; 26 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt: 4 Jan; 52 wks (n) 

Allen Jackson & the New.; 13 Dec; 52 wks (n) 

Tex & Jinx; 6-6:25 pni ; 17 Jan; 13 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt; 3 Jan; 52 wks (r) 

1-min anncmt; 26 Dec; 26 wks (n) 

Stn break; 18 Dee; 52 wks (n> 

1-min anncmt; 9 Dec; 13 wks (n) 

1-min anncmt; 15 Dec; 52 wks (n) 

Stn break; 16 Dec; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 3 Jan; 26 wks (r) 

Stn break; 8 Jan; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 8 Jan; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 9 Jan; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 31 Dec; 26 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt; 3 Jan; 26 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt; 3 Jan; 26 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt; 2 1 Feb; 19 wks (r) 

20-sec anncmt; 9 Jan; 52 wks <n > 

20-sec anncmt; 19 Dec; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 20 Dec; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 23 Dec; 52 wks In) 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



William Allison 
John V. Anderson 
T. H. Anderson Jr 
Donald B. Armstrong Jr 
Gil Babbitt 
Louis H. Berg art 
Marion ■ t ■ 1 1 m 
A. R. Boebroeh 
Robert ^ oung Brown 
I ,. I. Bundgu- 

John A. Cairns 
Peyton Carroll 
Paul Christian 
Milton J. Feldman 
Herbert S. Fox 
Alan GofT 
Orville Grisier 
M. Stewart Ireys 
Karl Knipe 
Mack I ■ 1>I. in-' 
Willium C. Lydan 
.1. Stanley Maeaulay 

Phil D. McHugh 

William M. Mills 
Robert Mullen 
Robert Nicolin 

Eugene Pilz 

Felix Pogliano Jr 
Raymond E. Prochnow 

Robert Singer 
Joseph II. Smith 
II. II. Tburlby 
Ralph G. Tnchman 
Ralph I. Yambert 



Redbook Magazine, N.Y., articles ed 

WCOM, Parkcrsburg, W. Va., owner 

Anderson. Davis *t Platte, N.Y., chairman of board 

MeCann-Friekson, N.Y.. research dir 

WCAU, Phila. 

Silton Brothers. dir merchandising 

Portland Journal. Portland, sis 

Joseph katz Co, N.Y., acct exec 

Ward Wheelock Co, Phila.. vp 

kastor, Farrell, Cheslev & Clifford Inc. N.Y., radio, 

lv dir 
John A. Cairns, N.Y., vp 
Dana Jones Co. L. A., copy chief 

Pal and Personna Razor Blade Co, N.Y., sis, adv dir 
J. M. Korn & Co. Phila.. chief copywriter 
Cunningham *x Walsh, N.Y.. art superv 
MBS, N.Y.. graphic presentation dir 
Conner, Denver 

Carborundum Co. Niagara Falls, mcrch dir 
Anderson, Davis & Platte, N.Y.. vp 
Fred Winner. N.Y. 

MeCann-Friekson. N.Y., acct exec 
Fssig-Macaulay, L. A., dir partner 

Phil D. McHugh Co. L. A., owner 



acct 



McKim, Monlrcs 

KFYD, Miipl>. 

Campbell. Milium. Mnpls. 

Joe Alpert. Denver, adv dir 

(Conner. Denver 

Merchandising consultant, L. A 

Esquire, Chi., prom mgr 
John A. Cairns. N.Y., pre*. 
Anderson, Davis & Platte, V* .. 

KTTV, I.. A., asst to gen mgr 
Ralph Yambert. II I w yd., owner 



Ketchum. MacLeod & Grove. Piltsb., acct exec 

Anderson & Roll. Omaha, partner 

Anderson & Cairns, N.Y.. same 

Same. Vp 

J. M. Korn & Co., Phila., dir radio, tv 

Same, vp 

Alport & O'Rourke. Portland, acct exec 

C. J. LaRoche Co, N.Y., aect exec 

Kenyon & Fckhardt. N.Y., copy superv 

Sherman & Marquette. N.Y., superv radio, tv programs 

Anderson & Cairns, N.Y., pres 

Ted H. Factor, L. A., copy chief 

Sherman & Marquette. N.Y., merchandising exec 

Same, dir plans, copy 

Same, vp 

Goff Associates, Wilmington (new firm) 

Wayne Welch Inc. Denver, acct exec 

Ketehum, MacLeod & Grove, Pittsb., acct exec 

Anderson & Cairns, N.Y"., vp 

Mack Leblang Co, N.Y., pres ( new firm) 

Foote, Cone & Belding. S. F.. aect exec 

Yambert, Prochnow. McHugh and Maeaulay Inc, Beverly Hills. 

sce-treas (new firm) 
^ ambert, Prochnow, McHugh and Maeaulay Inc. Beverly Hills, 

vp ( new firm ) 
MeCuire, Montreal, eastern operns mgr 
Mullen-Nicolln, Mnpls., partner I new firm ) 
Mulleii-Nieolin. Mnpls.. partner ( new firm ) 
Arthur C. Rippey »V Co, Denver, aect exec 
Wayne Welch Inc. Denver, acct exec 
Yambert, Prochnow. McHugh and Maeaulay Inc, Beverly Hills, 

vp ( new firm > 
< Mian. Chi., aect exce 
Anderson «X Cairns. N.l ., exec vp 

Anderson *\ Cairns, N.Y., vp 

Walter MeCreery Inc, Beverly Hills, radio, tv dir 

x ambert. Prochnow, McHugh and Maeaulay Inc. Beverly. Hills, 

pres ( new firm) 



IOWA PEOPLE LIVE 
WITH RADIO! 







BCOQPOm 

3.1% 

(WEEK DAYS) 



LIVING £CO/V\ 

45.5% 

(WEEK DftVs) 










ilx- 



KITCHiN 
20.0% 




OWING 

100M 

12.7% 



MOVE ABOUT 

(.WEEK OAYS) 



ft 



Une of the reasons why radio is so productive in 
Iowa is that listening is more than leisure-time 
entertainment. Our people live with radio. The 
1950 Iowa Radio Audience Survey* reveals that 
except for Sundays, less than half of all Iowa 
home listening ttikes place in the living room ! 
Here are all the figures: 

Proportion of Listening 
Done With — 





Weekdays 


Saturday* 


Sunday - 


Living Room Set 


45.3% 


48.9% 


55.1% 


Dining Room Set 


12.7 


11.9 


9.4 


Kitchen Set 


20.0 


19.4 


18.1 


Bed Room Set 


3.1 


4.2 


5.5 


"Move About" or 








"Other" 


18.9 


15.6 


11.9 



, DAILY USE OF SETS LOCATED IN DIFFERENT ROOMS 


(Percentages based on number of sets located in type of room named) 


TYPICAL WEEKDAY 


ALL DIARY FAMILIES 


Percentage of Sets Used 
at Some Time during Day 


If located in Living Room 


95.0% 


If located in Dining Room 


99.0% 


If located in Kitchen 


95.8% 


If located in Bed Room 


75.5% 


If "Moved About" or "Other" 


91.5% 



Extra sets help explain this "all-over-the-house" 
listening; 48.8% of Iowa's radio-equipped homes 
now have two or more sets! The chart in the next 
column (from the 1950 Survey) shows that these 
extra sets get intensive listenership. 

The net result of all this is that the average Iowa 
radio home listens a total of 13.95 "''listener 
hours," weekdays . . . 15.59 ""listener hours," Sat- 
urdays . . . and 13.52 ""listener hours,'''' Sundays! 

WHO continues to get far ami away the greatesl 
share of Iowa listening, thus continues to he one of 
America's great radio buys. Write for all the facfs 
today, including your free copy of the 1950 Iowa 
Radio 4udience Survev. 



time of listening by 930 Iowa families — all scientifically 
selected from Iowa's cities, towns, villages and farms. It 
is a "must" for every advertising, sales or marketing 
man who is inlerested in radio in general, and the Iowa 
market in particular. 

WIKI© 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



*The 1950 Edition of the Iowa Radio Audience Survey i> 
the thirteenth annual study of radio listening habits in 
Iowa. It was conducted by Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita 
University and his staff. It is based on personal inter- 
views with 9,110 families and diary records kept at the 

1 JANUARY 1951 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 

National Representatives 

17 




Usee, what was 1 trying 
to remember? 

WE HOPE YOU NEVER 
FORGET that KMA beams di- 
rectly to the best customers in 
the U. S.! "Best customers," 
because the rural and small 
town population of the 140 rural 
and small town counties of 
Iowa. Nebraska, Missouri and 
Kansas — reached by KMA — 
spend more money than in any 
other comparable rural area in 
the country. 

Only KMA can sell these 
2V£ million customers — 
not reached by your 
Omaha-Des Moines sched- 
ule. Write for facts today. 




KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 



Represented by 
Avery -Kttodet, Inc. 




Madison 




3&R's Enid Palmer whose letter appears below 

N. Y. TIMEBUYER CONFESSIONS 

WANTED: ADVERTISING AGEN- 
CY TIMEBUYER. Must have experi- 
ence as hijacker, confidence man, back- 
siabber, crystal ball gazer. Must be 
fast talker and fast eater. Man with- 
out conscience preferred. 

Fantastic? Not any more so than 
your recent article by that fellow who 
wrote "Confessions of a New York 
timebuyer." He had only one thing 
right: he knew enough not to sign his 
name ! 

According to him the standard 
equipment in a timebuyer's office con- 
sists of: 1. The above-mentioned crys- 
tal ball; 2. A giant economy-sized tube 
of Alka-Seltzer; 3. A handbook au- 
thored by Old Man Machiavelli him- 
self. To paraphrase an old punch line: 
"From this he made a living?" 

Maybe so . . . but I'm willing to 
stand treat to another of those fabu- 
lous lunches if the same client he's 
talking about is still with the same 
agency ! 

To begin with: I've never known an 
agency to spend a client's good mone) 
as haphazardly as he described. The 
Plans Board and the client decide 
where the monc\ is going to do, based 
on what they want to do. From that 
point on, there's no hugger-mugger in 
the hallways or conniving in the cor- 
ridors. The timebuyer knows what 
he's allowed, and he knows where he's 



going to spend it. and when. How does 
he determine this? 

1. By giving every rep a fair chance 
to state his case . . . sometimes at the 
lunch table, but far more often while 
seated on those hard office chairs. 2. 
By recognizing that there are lies, damn 
lies, and statistics . . . and reading be- 
tween the lines of rate cards and pro- 
gram schedules. 3. By spending each 
dollar as carefully as a housewife 
trudging around a supermarket. 

Sure, our boy who wrote that arti- 
cle had his tongue in his cheek. But I 
think he had his foot in there with it. 
Miss Enid Palmer 
Media Director 
Getschal & Richard Inc. 
New York 

(Photograph of Miss Palmer is by 
Jean Raeburn. N. Y.) 






PUBLIC RELATIONS REBUTTAL 

I was interested to read your piece 
on public relations men in sponsor. 
Bob Landry has a knack of putting 
across what he wants to say in an in- 
cisive way, clothed in new ways and 
with fresh word use — a rare gift. 

Wha gets me about the activities you 
describe is that people call them public 
relations when what they really are is 
press agentry of the old school. 

Maybe some day we can start a 
French Academv in this country and 
get disinterested experts to define the 
meaning of our words. 

Edward L. Bernays 
Public Relations Consultant 
New York 



The plain implications of Bob Lan- 
dry's remarks about "some off-tackle 
sneak of public relations" is that the 
news editors of our great metropolitan 
dailies, national magazines and ra- 
dio/TV are dunderheads who don't 
know an advertising plug from a T- 
formation. 

Editorial desks have their fair share 
of incompetents but, as a group edi- 
tors are a hard-eyed, fast-thinking, 
knowledgeable lot who can spot a pho- 
n\ plant quicker than Mr. Landry can 
say "compatibilitj between advertising 
and PR." Along with the suggestion 
that the average editor is a lunk-head, 
Mr. Landry implies that he can be 
bought for a case of scotch. 

Just where do these editors keep 
themselves? Has Mr. Landry seen any 
lately? Have the publishers who em- 
ploy them got holes in their heads, too? 
(Please turn to page 58) 



18 



SPONSOR 



got a whim? 
get a whim! 



BUY 



WHIM 



you'll come back for more 



*HEADLEY-REED will give you full details of the many 
national advertisers who have used WHIM successfully. 



WHIM — Providence, R. I. — 1,000 watts 



1 JANUARY 1951 19 




20 



SPONSOR 




VISUAL SELLING, AS IN OLDSMOBILE FILM (ABOVE) ATTRACTS AUTOMOBILE FIRMS TO TV. SPOT RADIO, TOO, GETS BIG USE 

What gear do we shift to now? 

Auto makers had plans for more air promotion than ever until . . . 



Which »ear do \\e shift to 
now? 

Hard-headed Detroit automobile pro- 
ducers who like to deal with solid, 
sharply-chiseled facts are confronted 
by a fog of uncertainty in calculating 
production and sales for 1951. Every- 
one in the vast industry down to the 
floorsweepers anticipates a cutback in 
production. No one knows how much 

1 JANUARY 1951 



and when it will be fell. \s SPONSOR 
goes to press, the most repeated guess 
is a 2.V < reduction in output. 

Harried advertising departments liv- 
ing to draw up media budgets arc 
working with one ear open for the lat- 
est directive from Washington. I he 
recent order freezing auto prices has 
intensified the wartime atmosphere. \ 
temporarj expedient for al leas! one 



compan) is to prepare no! one hut 

three budgets for L951. One set of 
figures is based on a small i eduction: 
another is adjusted for a medium cut- 
back; a third will be used il a severe 
production slash is necessary. 

1 1 the cut should be no greatei than 
25' i . there will still he a whopping 
5,000,000 passengei cars produced thi> 
vear. The auto advertisers could 20 



21 



RADIO 








SOLE NETWORK SHOWS: Desoto-Plymouth (Groucho Marx), Gen. Motors ( Henry Taylor) 



ahead with the radio and television pro- 
motional techniques they've smoothed 
out for greater selling effectiveness 
than ever this year. 

Here's the automohile air advertis- 
ing formula. 19Sf model: 

1. Stepped up announcement satu- 
ration campaigns on radio and TV. 
Local dealers also put more reliance 
on announcement drives. 

2. Extended purchases of sustaining 
network shows for hrief periods. 

3. Extensive television programing 
on the network level, and on the local 
level for dealer advertising. 

In the announcement campaigns, the 
ear producers are using broader and 
more intensive coverage, radio repre- 
sentatives report. Originality, too, has 
been noted. Eor example. Chevrolet's 
"See the U. S. A." melody was record- 
ed on three-minute announcement disks 
featuring well-known personalities that 
included l)i<k Haymes, Frances Lang- 
ford, Tom Mari in. Lauri'z Melchior, 
and Gladys Swarthout. Clever patter 



bridged the songs and the commercial 
read by Bud Collyer. 

At the same time that agencies were 
scrambling for all available adjacen- 



SPOT RADIO: Top stars sing Chevrolet song 

ties to air these announcements, sev- 
eral car advertisers took bold action 
with another tactic. They liked the in- 
novation that Ford tried on CBS last 
year and moved in with heavy short- 
term purchases of network shows. This 
year Buick. Chrysler, and Plymouth, 
in addition to Ford, are getting high 
compression advertising with these 
buys on NBC. ABC and CBS. Finding 
shows this season was no problem, 
since a number of good programs are 
without sponsors. 

The most significant development of 
1950 was the rush to get into network 
television programing. Nine compa- 
nies, Dodge, DeSoto, Ford, Lincoln- 
Mercury, Packard. Oldsmobile, Kaiser- 
Frazer. Hudson and Nash, are now 
spending up to $25,000 a week for pro- 
duction on individual shows. A tenth. 
Chevrolet, allots at least several mil- 
lion dollars for special events and large 
dealer funds that are used for local 
TV shows. 




DANCING COMMERCIALS: Mercury uses Toastottes to dance out rhythm of its commercials 



11 



SPONSOR 




SHORT-TERM BUY: Buick's "Screen Guild" 

Looking over the list, one network 
official comments. "You never saw a 
lineup of shows like that on radio." 
At the present time, the only two reg- 
ularly scheduled radio shows are Hen- 
ry J. Taylor's 15-minute commentary 
sponsored by General Motors for in- 
stitutional advertising purposes. The 
program is heard Mondays (ABC, 8:15 
p.m. to 8:30 p.m.). The other is You 
Bet Your Life with Groucho Marx, 
sponsored by DeSoto-Plymouth deal- 
ers (Wednesdays, NBC, 9 p.m. to 9:30 
p.m.). 

There is no doubt that the herd psy- 
chology that kept these advertisers out 
of widespread radio scheduling is now 
working the other way in television. 
(The decision by one maker to go into 
TV was influenced by a top executive 
who was annoyed at having to watch 
competitors' shows when he wanted to 
enjoy his set in the evenings.) 

The new medium is receiving en- 
thusiastic support from a powerful seg- 



ment of the industry — the dealers who 
are the front line sales force. If they 
are not supported by sufficient adver- 
tising artillery accurately aimed, the 
factory hears about it in a huir\. 
"Dealers love television. It's new and 
exciting and they like to talk about it 
\^ hen lunching at their athletic clubs," 
one agency explains. 

Curiously enough, this enthusiasm 
for TV has increased dealer interest in 
radio. Dealers in Indianapolis and oth- 
er markets have gone in for heavy sat- 
uration campaigns this season so that 
the over-all picture is that radio is be- 
ing used more extensively than in pre- 
vious seasons. 

Television is now competing with all 
the visual media, newspapers, maga- 
zines, and billboards, for this indus- 
try's huge promotion expenditures. The 
basic attraction the medium has for 
these producers is that viewers are 
brought right into the dealers' show- 
rooms. 1 his same audience is taken, 
by means of films, to testing grounds 
and the highways where performance 
can be demonstrated. Companies like 
Lincoln-Mercury also use films for 
glamour appeal showing the car amid 
luxurious surroundings. 

Magazines, which had been second 
only to newspapers as a primary me- 
dium for auto promotion, eventually 
should feel the effects of this trend to 
television. 

Looking at the trend from the net- 
work's side of the fence, it becomes 
clear that television must rely on those 
advertisers who can spend heavily. 
Chevrolet, for example, spends about 



§25,000,000 on advertising annually, 
perhaps $50,000,000 when dealer ex- 
penditures are added. Edward P. Mad- 
den. NBC's vice president in charge ol 
TV operations and sales, put it to his 
network this way: "In 1955 we esti- 
mate that it will cost $55,000 per week 
tc advertise in the 58 largest markets. 
I! the advertiser uses 39 weeks, it to- 
tals $1,950,000." How many advertis- 
ers can afford such rich fare? Madden 
pointed out that there were exactly 77 
advertisers whose media expenditures 
in 1949 equalled or exceeded $2,000,- 
000. "We anticipate that this number 
will increase in the next five years as 
retail sales and advertising volume in- 
creases," he said. 

Car manufacturers are devoting con- 
siderable sums to the TV commercials 
as well as to the programing. Their 
know-how in selling on this medium is 
evident on a number of shows. For 
example, Dodge tried a simple but en- 
tertaining angle for its pilch on the in- 
terior spaciousnessness of the car. 
First they showed a pudgy customer 
uncomfortably trying to enter another 
make. Then they showed him sliding 
easily into a Dodge. 

One approach used by a number of 
companies is the plugging of engineer- 
ing advantages called "nuts and bolts'' 
advertising in the trade. Among the 
top ranking exponents of this technique 
is Dr. Roy K. Marshall, whose middle 
commercial on the Kay Kyser show 
was extended to a full program all by 
itself. N. Y. Ford dealers sponsored a 
10-minute across the board series on 
I t'lea^r turn to page 47) 




FASHION COMMERCIALS: Ford stresses woman's appeal, fashion award NUTS AND BOLTS COMMERCIALS: TV ideal to show mechanics 



1 JANUARY 1951 



23 



America's Pied Piper 



Fabulous storv of D-Cou, 



new rat killer which hit jackpot through bold use of spot radio 




Lee Leonard Ratner. a hus- 
tling, rough-hewn Chicago 
merchandiser, is fast emerg- 
ing a^ the nation's Pied Piper. Through 
heavy use of radio, his rat-killing sen- 
sation. D-Con, has heen selling to the 
tune of some $100,000 in weekly sales. 
Sales should go even higher as his ad 
budget is increased. 

This brand name is b\ far the best 
known of the products containing a 



revolutlonar) new rodenticide called 
Warfarin. And Warfarin is packaged 
h\ 75 companies! 

Few listeners had heard am exter- 
minator advertising until Ratner. a 
shrewd business man who was a mil- 
lionaire at 24. launched his product 
last August. The 31-year-old tycoon 
told sponsor: 

"Exterminators (the compan) never 
i!~o the word poison I had a terrific 



market but no one had ever advertised 
the product properly." 

In an era when radio is said to 
have lost ground, it is significant 
that this advertiser is on his wa\ to 
making another million with the pow- 
erful assistance of the AM medium. 

These are the key points in Ratner s 
strateg\ : 

1. "Mail order is the only way to 
start a new product that you want to 




D-Con's "Saturday Night Bern Dance," WBBM, Chi- 
cago, is one of Lee Ratner's (center) radio efforts, the 
31-year-old head of D-Con entered the mail-order 
business when he was still attending Northwestern 
University. A millionaire by the time he reached 24, 
the curly-haired Chicago merchandiser found that 
"you can sell anything, if you use radio to introduce 
it." His mail order successes include a pocket adding 
machine, stainkss steel flatware, and now the rodenti- 
cide called D-Con, described in story on theie pages 




^^^H 




* .' 




• • 




• * . 










n^ M 


- -""^K^fc 


* — - - 






•*••»*■ ^^ 




• • , .* > ^ 


H»i ^1 


. ,".*"• •'* r 


■ ./ ^B 


• • 


81 jH 


,.—•--" 





D-Con cleaned out rats in dramatic Wisconsin town experiment Alvin Eicoff, Marfree Chicago v. p., points +o 400-station coverage map 



get in the big time. With the right 
dramatized appeal, distribution can be 
forced by arousing public demand. ' 

2. "Once you've got a brand start- 
ed, get out of mail order." He is now 
swinging over to a retail operation. 
Beginning with McKesson & Robbins 
as the first distributor, the smart young 
advertiser expects to have 25.000 dis- 
tributors by the end of Februarv. 

3. "Spend money to make money." 
In January he expects to spend about 
$60,000 weekly in radio out of an ad- 
vertising budget of approximately $75.- 
000 weekly. During the early mail-or- 
der phase, most of the time bought on 
more than 400 stations has been in the 
early morning hours to reach the rural 
market. 

4. "Radio is the best means of get- 
ting a product started." Newspapers 
are only effective once the consumer 
demand is established, particularly for 
city-wide listings. 

Now that his rodenticide is gaining 
momentum, the restless Chicagoan is 
preparing to expand in other direc- 
tions. He expects to bring out as manv 
as 10 to 12 household products which 
will break on radio or TV. Fli-Pel, an 
insecticide which was introduced at the 
end of last summer, is slated to get 
heavy radio emphasis this spring. 

How this aggressive advertiser 
brings up a new product from infancy 
is indicated by the technique he used 
for D-Con. 

One day last summer he heard about 
the University of Wisconsin discovery 
and made a quick trip to Madison. It 
took barely 30 minutes of discussion 
before he was convinced that here was 
a product with huge sales potentiali- 
ties. Arrangements were soon made 
with the S. B. Penick Company, one of 



the Warfarin licensees, for a carload 
of the material. The Marfree agency, 
New York and Chicago, was selected 
to handle the campaign because of 
their mail-order experience. Harr\ 
Friedenberg heads this firm and Alvin 
Eicoff. vice president of the agency in 
Chicago, supervises the account. I Frie- 
denberg had been a radio station rep- 
resentative for a number of years. ) 

The campaign was first aimed at the 
rural markets, for rodents ruin millions 
of dollars worth of grain every year. 
To reach the farmers. Marfree bought 
early morning time from 5:30 a.m. to 
7:30 a.m. The usual pattern has been 
15-minute segments on farm programs 
across the board. If no shows of this 
type are available, news adjacencies 
are bought. 

D-Con also approaches its rural mar- 
ket with such evening programs as the 
hour-long Saturdav night Barn Dance 
(WBBM. Chicago). Half-hour seg- 
ments of the Saturday Night Party 
iKMOX. St. Louis I. and the National 
Barn Dance I WLS. Chicago I are used, 
plus quarter-hour periods of the Old 
Dominion Barn Dance I WRVA. Rich- 
mond, and WBT. Charlotte I, Grand 
Old Opry (WSM, Nashville I. and Sat- 
urday Night Party (WIBW. Topeka). 

Marfree centers its efforts on sta- 
tions with previous mail-order suc- 
cesses which have dominant outlets in 
each market, and the best available 
farm programs. "After watching the 
returns for 10 days to two weeks on a 
new station, we can tell whether it is a 
good buy for us. If it is. we sign for 
13 or 26 weeks. Among the stations 
that are now being used in addition to 
those mentioned previouslv are Wl.W 
and WCKY. Cincinnati; KOA. Den- 
ver: WHO and KIOA. Des Moines: 



W JR. DctK.it: KROD. El Paso; KSTT, 
Davenport: WOR. New York; WCCO. 
Minneapolis; WON and WJJD, Chi- 
cago. 

Availabilities may be something of 
a problem this year, when Ratncr be- 
gins daytime programing from 8 a.m. 
to p.m. for the retail distribution in 
urban centers. One station man points 
out this product cannot be advertised 
on the usual homemaker programs. 
Food sponsors would protest if the ro- 
denticide is mentioned too close to 
their commercials. 

The first results in the mail order 
radio campaign were not encouraging. 
The copy had to be changed several 
times before the product really began 
to pull. 

These are some of the selling fea- 
tures of copy todav : 

1. "Every single rat on your prop- 
erty costs you $22 each year." listeners 
are told. 

2. D-Con is safe for animals. It will 
not kill or noticeablj harm domestic 
animals or pets. 

3. This product is so insidious that 
rodents never learn what is killing off 
their relatives. When other extermina- 
tors before Warfarin were tried, the 
clever rodents soon learned to stay 
away from the bait that was cutting 
down their numbers. Warfarin is odor- 
less and tasteless, producing a quiet, 
painless death several days after the 
poison has been eaten. In fact, the 
rodents have to return to the bait sev- 
eral times before they are stricken. 
D-Con. a light green powder, is most 
effective when mixed with corn meal. 
rolled oats, or hamburger. Four oun< es 
of D-Con. which sells for $2.98, is 
enough for about five pounds of fin- 

i Please turn to page J 1 | 



1 JANUARY 1951 



25 



What are the 

unions doing 
to television ? 



Breakdowns on those pages give 

you answers in terms of new wage 
scales, outlook for future 



A few weeks ago one oi the television indus- 
trv's more splenetic personalities sat down to 
write a speech about television. You never heard 
reports about what he first put down on paper because 
his public relations men toned him down. In essence. 
his self-censored opinions were: "The unions are murder- 
ing me." 

As 1950 drew to a close, there were few who felt quite 
this strongly about the recent contract signed with Tele- 
vision Authority. But effects were being felt by adver- 
tisers of every variety. 

To help pinpoint some of the effects. SPONSOR presents 
a breakdown on the current status of TV unions, com- 
plete, for the most part, on these two pages. You'll find 
data (at right I on Television Authority: the National 
Committee of the Author's League of America; Theatri- 
cal Protective Union 1 : and the American Federation of 
Musicians. I Also included at right is a capsuled account 
of the most recent contract negotiated with transcription 
firms by AFRA. It was presented in this otherwise ex- 
clusively television compilation because negotiations came 
to a bead just as this issue was being readied for 
publication. I 

Television Authority's important new contract meant 
different things to different sponsors. To Admiral, with 
its Lights Out (NBC-T\ I, it represented a 5', increase 
in its $9,000 weekl) program cost: this despite the Eacl 
that most of its talent is over-scale. To Harvester Cigars, 
with its Plainclothesman (DuMont), the contract meant 
an increase of about 1-V; on its $5,300 weekly program 
cosl largelj for in-scale talent. For big variety shows, 
cost increase is estimated at between 30 and 35%. 

Just what can sponsors do to off-sel some ol this new 

expense? Foi some constructive suggestions, see the 
report on Television Authority, which starts immediately 
to the right. 



The Television 
Authority 

Status: TVA's new code of fair practice went into effect on 8 
December. The settlement between TVA. the four networks, 
and WOR-TV called off a threatened walkout, increased the 
prevailing minimum pay scales, and increased limitations on 
the showing of film recordings (including the stipulation that 
kinescope film can not be shown a second time "without the 
written consent of the authority"!. The settlement also pushed 
production costs to a new high. 

When SPONSOR surveyed agencies and networks on methods 
of holding down production costs, one harassed TV producer 
said. "I haven't the slightest idea, unless our sponsor goes in 
exclusively for marionettes!" 

Most producers had a more realistic point of view, have taken 
out production shears to cul the frills from many shows. Sug- 
gestions from a number of producers for keeping cost down 
as listed below : 

1. Have fewer singer-, dancers, and specialty acts appear- 
ing in productions. 

2. Decrease the three and four-member specialty acts and 
increase one and two-performer numbers. 

3. Strive for smaller productions to cut down extra rehear- 
sal time. 

4. Eliminate small speaking parts in dramatic shows. 

5. Avoid "taking chances" with newcomers and devote pay 
to overscale star talent. 

Expiration: 30 November 1952. 

Negotiations: Although settlement has been reached and signed. 

negotiations are still in progress to iron out small details. 

Terms: The major terms of the TVA Code of Fair Practice are 
listed below: 

I. Performers who speak more than five lines [Extra rehear- 
sal S5 an hour I 



Length of program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
31 to 60 minutes 



Performances 


15 min. 


or less 


16 to 30 min. 


31 to 60 min. 


Per Week 


Fee 


Hours 


Fee Hours 


Fee Hours 


1 


s 7(1 


5 


$125 12 


$170 22 


2 


130 


9 


220 19 


230 28 


3 


180 


14 


250 26 


290 32 


4 


220 


19 


275 33 


345 K) 


5 


250 


24 


300 40 


400 40 



Total fee Rehearsal hours included 
$ 70.00 5 

125.00 12 

170.00 22 



11. Multiple performances pet neck, performers more than 5 
lines. {Extra rehearsal $5 an hour) 



111. Performers who speak five lines or less {Extra rehearsal 
$5 an hour. Rehearsal on two days or less, one to be show <l<n I 



Length of program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
31 to 60 minutes 



Total fee Rehearsal hours included 
$50.00 I 

62.50 6 

75.00 9 



{Please turn to />age 591 



National Television 
Committee 

of the Authors League of America 

Status: NTC has mi TV contract as yet. 

Negotiations: The National Television Committee is now nego- 
tiating with ABC, CBS. and NBC on behalf of those of its mem- 
bers whose material is used in television. 

Demands: No official figures are available, but sponsor learned 
that the approximate demands of NTC are as follows: 

1. For general literary material, (other than sketches and 
adaptations) 10°,', of gross production costs or the flat minimum 
of $300 to $700 sustaining and $450 to $1,125 commercial, 
whichever is the greater. 

2. For sketches. $200 sustaining and $300 commercial. 

3. For adaptations. 7 1 /£% of gross production costs or $200 
to $500 sustaining and $300 to $750 commercial, whichever is 
the greater. 

4. For original songs. $200 sustaining and $300 commercial. 
Outlook: Because the present negotiations are pattern setting in 
that there has been no previous contract, bargaining is still in 
the exploratory stage. If most of the union demands are met, 
it will mean a substantial increase in production cost for many 
shows. For the Plainclothesman (DuMont). as an example, the 
demands would mean an approximate 10 to 15% cost increase. 



Theatrical 
Protective Union 



Status: Theatrical Protective has a straight employment con 
tract with TV networks and stations employing some H00 stage- 
hands, technicians, set operators, builders, handlers, and rig- 
gers. Tin- contract covers working hours, wages, and working 
conditions on a 24-hour-a-day schedule. 

Expiration: Contract expired labor Day. Old contract i- riding 
from period to period according to time schedules sel up be- 
tween the union and the network-. 

Negotiations: Negotiations have been going on occasionally since 
August and are in progress again. 

Demands: Theatrical Protective is seeking a 1(1' , wage increase 
and a 5% employer payroll contribution to a welfare fund for 
the union. Whatever is finally decided, i- to be retroactive to ~> 
September. 

Outlook: According to John McDowell, recording secretary of 
the union, the outlook looks "harmonious." And SPONSOR 
learned from other sources that a verbal agreement ha- already 
been made and that a contract i- now being prepared. The 
union demands would mean approximately a 25% increase in 
total production costs. The networks have had to face the feet 
that the stagehands have had no increase in wages for several 
years; the union pointed to pay hike- recently given to oilier 
TV trades. 



•ft#^WfWT^f^r«7^^t 



The American 
Federation of Musicians 

Status: AFM has a straight employment contract with TV net- 
works and stations employing musicians for TV broadcast pur- 
poses. Contract covers live performances with a provision for 
a limited number of kinescope showings. 
Expiration: 31 January 1951. 

Negotiations: No bargaining date has been set up. Probably, 
talks will begin in January with the major networks and affect- 
ed locals chiefly limited to Los Angeles. Chicago, and New 
York. 

Demands: In May. AFM offered contracts to concerns produc- 
ing TV shows on film. The contract covered working hours, 
wages, and working conditions — plus a royalty provision where- 
by 5% of station time is paid by the producer into a trustee 
fund to hire idle musicians for charity shows, etc. Petrillo. 
AFM president, has already signed such "royalty clause con- 
tracts" with Gene Autry, Louis Snader. Horace Heidt. and a 
number of independent packagers. 

Outlook: Networks, film companies, and most independent pack- 
agers have gone on record opposing the 5% royalty clause. 
There is a strong possibility of an industry deadlock with the 
stakes so high. The proposed royalty clause is similar to the 
royalty agreement the union has with the record industry. 



American Federation 
of Radio Artists 

Status: On 30 November. 1950. AFRA completed negotiations 
with transcription companies. Most of the 22 demands made 
by the union were met. Essentially, the results of the negotia- 
tions are as follows: 

1. Open end and custom built transcription producers will 
be paying actors the live rate which is about 10% more than 
the idd transcription code. 

2. Announcement rates went up 200" (1 : the talent rates in- 
creased 100' , ; and the length of time transcriptions can be 
used was cut from -i\ months to 13 weeks. 

3. Music libraries were also hit with a 100', average in- 
crease. 

Expiration: 31 October 1952. 

Outlook: Major advertisers may drop some of their transcribed 

announcements. In the past a sponsor had been able to use a 
transcribed announcement for six months before paying for its 
use again. The sponsor now pa— e- out the dollar- ever} three 
months. Different types of talent may replace the transcrip- 
tion group singer- becau-e I a lent rates have jumped so high. 



\* 



X 



\ 



>*' 




DC&S PRESIDENT SHENFIELD (LEFT) GETS IN ON RADIO-TV DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES LIKE PLANNING FILM COMMERCIALS 



They're only small in numbers 



This is the way they operate in the Doherty, 
Clifford & Shenfield radio-TV department 



inside the ageneies: 
a SPONSOR series 



over-ail 



What goes on inside the 
human brain factory called 
an advertising agency? 

You can't tell much from the slick 
reception room with its leather-uphol- 
stered chairs, low glass-topped tahles, 
and expensive lamp-shades. 

In the first article of a series, spon- 
sor takes you past the reception room 
into the behind-the-scenes ollices where 
the agency really functions. This time 
it's the 52nd floor of the Empire State 



30 



Building — the radio/TV department of 
Doherty, Clifford, & Shenfield. 

DC&S calls itself "smaller-than-giant 
but larger-than-average,"' as agencies 
go. Its annual billings now run be- 
tween $7,500,000 and $10,000,000; 
better than triple what the firm started 
with in May, 1944. All five partners— 
Lawrence L. Shenfield. Francis J. Do- 
herty. Donald K. Clifford. Arthur 
Cobb, Jr.. and William E. Steers — 
worked together for 15 years or more 



before striking out on their own. 

They opened shop with one main 
account (Bristol-Myers), and several 
smaller ones. Bristol-Myers' products 
still account for the largest share of 
the billings at Doherty. Clifford & 
Shenfield. The agency is fully respon- 
sible for Ipana Toothpaste, Vitalis. 
Mum. Bcnex Brushless. and Ingram's 
Shaving Creams, plus some new B-M 
items. It also supervises the AM and 
TV versions of Break the Bank (NBC) 

SPONSOR 



and Ipanas participation in Lucky 
Pup ( CBS-TV K 

Other DC&S clients: 

Welch Crape Juice Company — 15- 
minute segment of Howdy Doody 
(NBC-TV) and a six-a-week radio 
show over WCFM, Washington, D. C. 

The Pioneer Ice Cream Division of 
the Borden Company — TV announce- 
ments for Reid's, and Horton's ice 
creams. 

Dobbs Hats. Ammen's Medicated 
Powder, Sun Tube Company, and Al- 
len-A Company (knit goods manufac- 
turers) . 

Like every other advertising agency, 
Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield has de- 
veloped its own formula for giving top 
service with perfect efficiency to the 
client. Here are the outstanding char- 
acteristics of the agency's radio/TV 
operation : 

1. It uses a relatively small number 
of top men, each of whom has the ex- 
perience to "double" effectively in sev- 
eral fields. 

2. It hires outside, free-lance, spe- 
cialists to do specific jobs. Examples: 
animators, musical arrangers, program 
packagers, etc. 

3. A maximum amount of pre-film 
production planning is done in the 
agency, ensuring first-rate commercials 
at moderate cost. 

This is how the system works in ac- 
tual practice. Shenfield, both because 
of interest and wide experience in the 
field, is the agency partner especially 
responsible for the radio-TV opera- 
tions. Chester "Mac" MacCracken. 
vice president in charge of radio and 
television, initiates plans involving the 
broadcast media, keeps an eye on day- 
to-day operations. MacCracken spent 
three years at Pedlar & Ryan, seven 
years at Benton & Bowles writing 
scripts and commercial copy. He also 
produced several radio shows, includ- 



TV film commercials are a DC&S specialty 





Guiding principles 
of DC&S operation 

DC&S radio-TV department has its 
own way of doing things. For sum- 
mary of key operating principles, see 
numbered points below. Picture at 
right shows four members of depart- 
ment working on spot radio cam- 
paign. L. to r., radio producer Russ 
Ambruster, vice president Chester 
MacCracken, assistant producer Sy 
Lein, and copywriter Ruth Loveaire 



1. The agency employs a small number of top men — copywriters, producers. Each 
has several specialties, enabling them to "double" effectively on a variety of jobs. 

2. Top-notch free-lancers are hired to do individual projects, supplementing regular 
staff when the work load gets heavy or a particular effect is sought. Free-lance 
experts hired in the past have included animators, musical arrangers, and illustrators. 

3. A maximum amount of pre-production planning for TV films is done in the agency. 
Casts are hired, scenery is commissioned, spocial optical effects are arranged for 
by the agency's film director. 

•4. Packaged shows are favored, since they keep detail work away from the compact 
radio-lV department. But the agency frequently makes changes after buying a 
package, looks for ways to improve it. 

5. Timebuying is considered strictly a media department job, leaving the radio-TV 
department free for creative work. 

(}. Everyone gets a chance to contribute ideas for a campaign. Small, democratic 
department encourages versatility. 



© Look Magazine 



ing Mr. District Attorney. 

"Mac" MacCracken's department 
numbers only 10, counting secretaries 
and typists. But each creative brain is 
accustomed to tackling a variety of 
problems. Main burden of the copy- 
writing, for example, falls on the shoul- 
ders of Robert Smock and Ruth Love- 
aire. Smock has written radio and TV 
copy for a half-dozen agencies; was 
most recently at Hewitt, Ogilvy, Ben- 
son & Mather. He also has the advan- 
tage of being a cracker- jack jingle 
writer. 

For commercial broadcast copy 
aimed at women, the department re- 
lies mainly on Ruth Loveaire. Miss 
Loveaire came from Benton & Bowles 
where she had been doing the same 
kind of copywriting. She and Bob 
Smock work together on new cam- 
paigns, both sit in on copy platform 
planning sessions. 

At DC&S. general copy platform* 
usually originate with partner Francis 
J. Doherty and vice president Jame> 
F. Egan. Smock and Miss Loveaire 
work independently of the space copy- 
writers, but close contact is maintained 



through Egan to keep all copy stories 
in the same basic pattern. 

Both copywriters are ambidextrous 
as far as radio and TV copy is con- 
cerned. They handle either, depending 
on the constantly shifting needs of the 
department. On the production end. 
however, Rod Albright specializes in 
television production exclusively. Orig- 
inally hired for his long experience in 
filming movies, Albright supervises 
live stanzas of programs like Break the 
Bank on TV, directs most film televi- 
sion commercials as well. He came to 
the agency from Willard Pictures after 
many years of writing, directing, pro- 
ducing, and filming movies on both 
coasts and in the U. S. Air Corps. 

In selecting Rod Albright lor the 
job, DC&S followed its penchant for 
luring experts. Explains Chester Mac- 
Cracken: "Rod had little or no direct 
advertising experience whem he joined 
us in 1948. but we felt we could supply 
that information. We counted on him 
In help us in learning to think of ad- 
vertising cop\ in terms of pictures in 
motion, as well as to select the film 
[Please turn to page •~>' | i 



1 JANUARY 1951 



31 



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i^-y 






, 




1 



\o 



(\ 



<"?TP 



7.Q5Q 



. So > 



1 



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an "*« is t here 






Mister PLUS, in your hands, can put a stamp of approval for your brand on 
millions of minds in hundreds of markets — minds and markets which are largely 
inaccessible to any other advertising medium. 

He alone is there... because there is Home Town America. 11.000.000 families 
strong, a thriving fourth of the whole U.S. which lives and listens within 
close reach of a Mutual 'solo' station. 

To serve these markets— from within — Mutual provides 325 stations, each one 
speaking in the neighborly tones of the only network voice in town. 

And this voice gets heard— longer and oftener than all out-of-town voices combined.^ 

Coupled with bigger-city coverage by Mister PLUS, this Home Town domination 
can make a vital profit -difference in your sales efforts for "51. 



Mutual Broadcasting System 

+ 58',< of all Home Town tune-in is to MBS by day; 53' , 
by night. Next best network 13% by day. 
18' ( by night. And TV tune-in is less than ! s of 1%! 
Source: Haifa million interviews by Crossley. 





Mr. Sponsor ashs.. 



What major trends tit radio/TV advertising 
do you see coming up in 1951? 



F. H. Peters 



Advertising manager 

Frigidaire Division 

General Motors Corp., Dayton 




Mr. Clay 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Peters 

This question, 
like Dr. Doolit- 
tle's Push-Me- 
P u 1 1-E m, is a 
two-headed ani- 
mal. The answer 
to i t depends 
somewhat on 
which head 
points the course 
the animal is to 
take; whether 
our national direction for '51 is the 
load of total war or one, merely, of 
slepped-up preparedness. In either 
case, it seems obvious at this time, cer- 
tain factors will prevail, and the dif- 
ference exists primarily as one of de- 
gree. 

Whether our 51 fate is war or cold 
war, it is quite clear that we are to be 
confronted with an excess profits tax. 
This means that there are going to be 
a great many cheap corporate dollars 
aimed at selling products and estab- 
lishing competitive superiority rather 
than at the coffers of the government. 
It is, therefore, evident that in- 
creased revenue is in the offing for the 
radio and television industry. That is 
the primary foreseeable trend. Its di- 
rection . . . whether toward announce- 
ment advertising or toward institution- 
al-program advertising ... is the cle- 
ment which lies in the war-or-peace bal- 
ance. 

At this time it appears that the I idl- 
ed States is headed into a year of in- 
tense increased preparedness with per- 



haps an immediate prospect of war; 
and likewise with an extremely uncer- 
tain economic future. So long as this 
situation prevails, the emphasis in in- 
creased radio advertising spending will 
be in the form of announcements. 

Announcement advertising is the 
safest course while the country is in 
this uncertain condition. The adver- 
tiser knows that a well-planned pro- 
gram of announcement product pro- 
motion will do the job for him. In un- 
dertaking this form of advertising pro- 
gram, he commits himself to very little. 
His term and cycle are short and in 
this, as opposed to program advertis- 
ing, he is not committed to building 
anything that an unexpected dollar 
shortage will injure. Thus, he is pre- 
pared for any change which might 
cause him to shift his emphasis or his 
spending. 

If, on the other hand, we are headed 
toward an all-out war, radio will feel 
a tremendous boost in program spon- 
sorship. A successful war will be a 
long-term proposition. In war, the ad- 
vertiser will anticipate a great prolon- 
gation of the financial results of rigid 
corporate and excess profits legislation. 
Around that he can commit himself to 
the long, slow process ol building up a 
program of his own directed toward 
the proven ability of program radio- 
TV to become a listening and/or view- 
ing habit ; a respected, appreciated 
service of the sponsor and his product. 

In the light of recent events, many 
observers feel that even if war does not 
come in 1951. it will come at a time 
not too far distant. In the light of this, 
many advertisers can be expected to 
devote large proportions of their bud- 
get to program advertising, and al- 
though announcement buying will eon- 




Mr. Weldon 



tinue to outweigh institutional, '51, in 

my opinion, will feel an upsurge of the 

latter. 

Henry B. Clay 

General Manager 

KWKH 

Shreveport 

Unfortunate- 
ly much of our 
thinking about 
the future of tel- 
evision must now 
be conditioned by 
the transition of 
our economy 
from a peacetime 
to a wartime foot- 
ing. It seems in- 
evitable that in- 
dustry will have to convert to military 
production to at least the extent of 
World War II. For television, this 
probably means the eventual elimina- 
tion of television set manufacture and 
a leveling off of the television market 
at a point somewhat ahead of where 
it is at present. 

Fortunately for the industry, the 
point at which this will occur in most 
markets is a level of set ownership at 
which the use of television advertising 
is worthwhile for a large classification 
of advertisers. Furthermore, a great 
many stations are now at a point which 
at least allows them to break even and 
amortize their equipment investment, 
if not make substantial profits. 

This temporary stabilization of the 
industry should have at least one im- 
portant effect — it should tend to sta- 
bilize television rates, which have tend- 
ed continually upward during the past 
five years. It will also mean, however, 
that main communities now without 
television service will remain in that 



34 



SPONSOR 



position for some years to come. 

Although the growth in set owner- 
ship should come to a gradual halt 
during the naxt year or so, the eftec- 
tiveness of television advertising should 
continue to improve. Advertisers and 
agencies have had five years of experi- 
ence in program and commercial tech- 
niques. The lessons they have learned 
and are continuing to learn should 
contribute greatly to more efficient util- 
ization of the medium. In many im- 
portant markets, television now domi 
nates the nighttime broadcast picture 
Continuing improvement in program?- 
and commercial techniques will un 
doubtedly reinforce this dominanci 
even though the increase in set owner 
ship slows down or halts. And, o^ 
course, the whole field of daytime tele 
vision programing remains to be fully 
explored and exploited. 

Coupled with these hopeful aspect: 
of the television picture are the facts 
that the tax situation will undoubtedly 
create a favorable climate for advertis 
ing expenditure; and newsprint and 
magazine paper stock will again be in 
short supply, which means that both 
television and radio time will be in 
demand. 

A trend toward film programing is 
sure to be accentuated in 1951. Bige- 
low-Sanford and Pepsi-Cola, by plac- 
ing their program on film on a spot 
basis, have graphically demonstrated 
the advantages of this type of televi- 
sion program placement for the adver- 
tiser. First, they were able to clear de- 
sirable time in most of the markets 
they wanted. Second, they were able 
to choose the stations and markets they 
wanted to use vvtih complete freedom 
and flexibility. Third, they are able to 
employ the time of their talent more 
efficiently. Fourth, they enjoy a more 
favorable rate in many instances. 
Fifth, the promotion and merchandis- 
ing help they are receiving from the 
stations is accentuated by the larger 
revenue the station derives from na- 
tional spot film business. 

The cost differential between live 
network and film has been eliminated 
because stations operators now realize 
that the advertiser who furnishes a 
complete film program on a spot basis 
is entitled to a rate advantage — that he 
should not be required to share the 
burdensome cost of coaxial cable or 
micro-wave relay facilities. Enough 
stations now favor the film advertiser 
(Please turn to page 57) 



^ SPONSORS GET 
"PROMOTION PW$" 
ON 

WDSU 

*0VER 5,000 LINES OF 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING 

EVERY WEEK, AIMED DIRECTLY 

AT NEW ORLEANS LISTENERS! 




1 JANUARY 1951 



35 




for healthy 



drug store 



sales . . . 



If your product is sold in 
drug stores, KVLC is the 
fastest acting medicine to 
perk up your Arkansas sales 
curve. 

Drug store sales in Arkan- 
sas exceed $40,000,000 an- 
nually. Arkansas families 
spend an average of $74.00 
a year in drug stores. 

To get your share of this 
healthy drug store volume, 
tell and sell Arkansas fami- 
lies over KVLC, where results 
are fast! 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports of 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



Kuhlapolitans charm customers of Minnettpolis store 



A show they don't even sponsor pro- 
vided the theme of the Dayton Com- 
pany s Christinas promotion. The firm. 
Minneapolis' largest department store, 
devoted an entire city block of win- 
dows to "Christmas With the Kukla- 




Kukla, Frank & Ollie provide Xmas theme 

politans," featuring characters from 
NBC-TV's Kukla, Fran & Ollie. 

Burr Tillstrom. Fran Allison, and 
others aided the Dayton Department 
Store promotion b\ making personal 
appearances in Minneapolis. RCA Vic- 
tor, one of the program's sponsors, 
picked up the tab. 

Dayton's used one short TV an- 
nouncement on KSTP-TV to plug tick- 



ets to the show. The following da\ 
tickets were all gone and, report has 
it. were being black-marketed about the 
Twin Cities (Minneapolis, St. Paul I . 

Each of the 12 windows dramatized 
a time of Christmas day. One of the 
scenes showed Kukla. Fletcher Rabbit. 
Madame Ooglepuss. and others trying 
to drag Ollie out of bed. Verse on an 
accompanying scroll: 

It's Merry Christmas morning 

And Ollie's no! aivake 

Yond think he'd see the people 

And hear the noise they make! 

The window displays were used at 
Dayton's until just before Christmas. 
Approximate cost of construction and 
design was $15,000. with traffic past 
the windows estimated at 200,000 a 
week. 

Comments from Dayton Company 
customers were very favorable. KSTP- 
TV advertisers, also impressed, cited 
the RCA-KSTP-TV-Dayton Company 
joint promotional effort as the biggest 
single program promotion in some 
time. It also proved to sponsor RCA 
Victor that Kukia, Fran & Ollie. seen 
via kinescope in the Twin Cities, are 
well-known TV favorites there. * * * 




Radio van sell anything — this time it's fish 



The item for sale was tropical fish : 
the "bait" — a saturation campaign on 
WFAS, White Plains. It brought the 
customers flocking to the Westchester 
Aquarium in neighboring Harrison. 
New York. 

The Aquarium was first opened in 
early 1949. At that time, tbe\ broad- 
cast a total of 200 announcements, 
about three a day. for a total cost oi 
S27<>. The response was immediate. 
Owner Irving Straus estimates his in- 
itial radio campaign brought in 200 
new customers. 

"This.' sa\s Straus, "doesn t include 
the hundreds of visitors whom we 



didn't count, but many of whom We 
know have since become tropical fish 
hobbyists." 

Customers came from all parts of 
New Jersey and Connecticut and the 
amount of money they spent far out- 
weighed the cost oi the campaign. Bus- 
iness was so good, in fact, that a lav- 
isli. new tropical fish emporium — one 
of the largest in the country — was 
opened in White Plains. 

Again the Aquarium turned to ra- 
dio. The investment was $196.50 for 
.'>() announcements with the amount be- 
ing more than made up for within 
hours after opening. 



• • • 



36 



SPONSOR 



, 



Arthur Pryor: radio still 
lowest unit vost (iff medium 

TV has kicked radio in the shins 
hut it will never drive AM from the 
advertising spectrum. Arthur Pryor, 
Jr.. vice president of BBDO. expressed 
this opinion to a group of leading 
broadcast advertising executives at a 
recent meeting of the Radio Executives 
Club in Boston. He added that radio 
would for many years remain the low- 
est unit co"t advertising medium. 

Among those present at the meeting 
were: (left to right I Richard North- 
iop. president and treasurer. R. 1). 
Northrop Co.; Karl Frost, president. 
Harry M. Frost Co.. Inc.; Charles 
Morse, senior vice president. Doremus 
& Co.; Arnold Rosoff. treasurer. Ar- 
nold & Co.; Harold E. Fellows, gen- 
eral manager of WEEI and president 



Briefly . . . 

Radio, in a troubled world, is again 
up front performing its share of pub- 
lic service activities. Typical was the 
appearance of the Secretary of Treas- 





Sec of Treasury appears on "Theatre Guild" 

ur\. John W. Snyder, on a recent 
broadcast of TJ. S. Steel's Theatre 
Guild on the Air on NBC. Mr. Snyder 
spoke to listeners on the importance of 
U. S. Savings Bonds purchases. 



Top execs meet at recent Boston radio talk 

of the Radio Executives Club; Francis 
Hatch, vice president. BBDO: Jack 
Wright, radio director. BBDO (all 
Boston I ; Arthur Pryor, Jr., vice presi- 
dent and radio, TV director. BBDO. 
N. Y. ; Paul Hoag. president. Hoag & 
Provandie Inc.; James Chirurg, presi- 
dent. James Thomas Chirurg Co.; Au- Latest in agency acct change announcements 

gust Hirschbaum, vice president, Al- 
bert Frank-Guenther Law Inc.; and * * * 
George Mathewson, BBDO. * • * 




Silhouette com me r viols 
entertain It 'I ft fans 

The S & W Foods Company has a 
new twist for its commercials over 
K.TTV, Los Angeles. They use card- 
board silhouettes to sell and entertain. 

Each commercial portrays an aver- 
age American in an average occupa- 
tion or simply enjoying his leisure 
hours. Simple pieces of cardboard are 
transformed into fascinating illusions 
at minimum cost to convey the impres- 
sion of a big production. Typical ex- 
ample: a silhouette portrayal of a sur- 
veying team out in the country. 

The one-minute commercials are 
used on a five-minute show, consisting 
of "soundies' ? or musical shorts. * * * 



WUSN, MBS affiliate in Charleston, 
gives the latest news, weather reports, 
sports and important events, on their 




S. C. Governor Thurmond dedicates new sign 

new flashcast sign. Thirty-six sponsors 
have their advertising copy and slo- 
gans displayed hourl) along with the 

npivs k k k 



E 



usiness is great, 
thank you, at • • . 

RADIO 
WOW 




WOW is embarking on 
one of the heaviest 
commercial schedules 
in its 28 years in 
business — BUT — 

WOW is like a great 
hotel — room can al- 
ways be found for a 
good client who has 
a selling job to be 
done in WOW-Land. 

WOW can always add a 
cot (with a fine inner- 
spring mattress, too!) in 
the bridal suite. 

Why the great rush of 
clients to WOW, when 
other stations are 
scrapping for business? 

Because WOW has 100,000 
more listening families 
every day and every night 
than its nearest compet- 
itor. Because WOW delivers 
this audience at a lower 
cost per thousand. 

WOW 

Insurance Bldg., Omaha 

Telephone WEbster 3400 

Frank P. Fogarty, Gen'l. Mgr. 

Lyle DeMoss, Ass't. Gen'l. Mgr. 

or 

ANY JOHN BLAIR OFFICE 



1 JANUARY 1951 



37 



COOKBOOK 



VEGETABLE SI 14 I It 






SPONSOR: United Fruit Co. AGENCY: BBDO 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The United Fruit Com- 

pany wanted to give away a cookbook. The purpose: to 
create goodwill and increase the usage of bananas in 
various preparations. Two announcements costing $230 
were used on Chicago Cooks With Barbara Barkley, 
a one-hour home economics demonstration. With only 
these two announcements, the United Fruit Company re- 
ceived almost 5,000 requests for the book. 

PROGRAM: Chicago Cooks With 
Barbara Barkley 




i I'lioisii him. 



SPONSOR: Hartman AGENCY: Dean Simmons 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Hartman Slicer Com- 

pany used four participations in the Del Courtney Show, 
a mid-afternoon disk jockey program. Advertising ex- 
penditure ivas $140 and it netted 2.700 orders or a gross 
of $2,700. The advertising agency says: "The results 
achieved ivith four participations and our continuation in 
the Del Courtney Show speak for themselves." $140 
brought $2,700 and only five minor complaints. 



KPIX, San Francisco 



PROGRAM: Del Courtney Show 



RAZOR 111 AIM S 



SPONSOR: Standard Sales Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : This sponsor manufactures 

and distributes cosmetics, shoe polish, headache powders, 
and razor blades. They contracted for two announce- 
ments iveekly to promote their Nu Steel razor blades. 
The sales spurt far outstripped the $60 weekly expendi- 
ture. The company reports that the sales of razor blades 
in the territory covered by TV have increased 87.4%. 



WAFM-TV, Birmingham 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



I Ol IIIV4. DOOKS 



SPONSOR: Le Roy Upholstery Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Le Roy people offer 

various upholstering services at costs ranging from $47.50 
upward. They decided to test video's pull and bought a 
single participation on Movie Gems, an afternoon film 
feature. The cost: $80. From this one presentation, the 
firm, received 50 leads. This meant a gross minimum 
potential of $2,375 — a very large response for a. high 
priced service such as theirs. 



KTTV, Los Angeles 



PROGRAM: Movie Gems 



SPONSOR: John N. Kohnen & Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The makers of Foldoors 

used a two-minute participation on the Shoppers Guide 
program. The time cost for appearing on this evening 
show was $30. {The Foldoor sells for $36.) The com- 
pany had signed a 52-iveek contract with the station and. 
gratifyingly, the response to their first participation 
brought in over $900 worth of business, plus scores of 
sales leads. 

WTVJ, Miami PROGRAM: Shoppers Guide 



I Id TKI.XU SERVICE 



SPONSOR: Morgan Trucking Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: Morgan was one of the 

first industrial firms to use television in the Carolinas. 
They sponsored Top Views in Sports, a Sunday night 
show. Mr. Bondurant, president of the company, tells the 
rest of the story: "On Monday morning, after the very 
first show, a customer walked into our office. He men- 
tioned the show and gave us an order amounting to 80,- 
000 pounds of shipping. It proves to me that television 
pays off." 



WFMY-TV, Greensboro 



PROGRAM: Top Views in Sports 



REAL ESTATE 



SPONSOR: White Investment Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The advertiser used one 

TV commercial a week at a cost of $65 phis, slides. The 
announcement preceded the Minneapolis Lakers' basket- 
ball games and consisted of the slides with a live an- 
nouncement on audio giving a description of the homes 
offered for sale. Medium priced homes were emphasized. 
The firm's advertising resulted in several sales and a 
number of inquiries. Credit restrictions have temporarily 
stopped their air work. 



WTCN-TY. Minneapolis 



PROGRAM: Announcements 




$E «.ie» 



WDEL-TV 

sells your product in the 
nation's top market 

"Wilmington — first in income per 
family among all U. S. Metropolitan 
centers of 100,000 or over." 

Sales Management 1950 Buying Power Survey. 

"Delaware — first in retail store pur- 
chases; has highest per capita ex- 
penditure of any state." 

U.S. Census Bureau— July 2. 1950. 

WDEL-TV- the only television station 
in Delaware. Its audience is growing 
by leaps and bounds. NBC and DuMont 
network shows, many popular local 
daytime and evening programs. Let 
WDEL-TV sell your product. 



Represented by 



WGAL-TV 

only station that reaches 
this rich market 



Lancaster, York, Lebanon, Read- 
ing, Harrisburg and adjacent areas 
in Pennsylvania. In addition to its 
ability to produce profitable sales for 
you, WGAL-TV is an ideal test station 
because it is the only station that 
reaches these extremely prosperous 
markets. Top shows from four net- 
works—NBC, ABC, CBS and DuMont. 
WGAL-TV is important in your TV 
sales planning. Write. 



ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES 

NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 
Steinman Stations • Clair R. McCollough, Gen. Mgr. 



1 JANUARY 1951 



39 



You can't buy 
TIMEBUYER quotes 

like these: 



Foote, Cone & Beldiny 

"SPONSOR is the brightest newcomer to the field of ad- 
vertising publications in many a long day." 

Fairfax M. Cone. Chairman of Bd. 

Blow 



"SPONSOR really keeps us posted on what's going on in 
radio and television advertising." 

Ethel Wieder. Timebuyer. 

I ririii. Wasey 



"The SPONSOR method of presentation was long over- 
due. I feel that SPONSOR greatly deserves the important 
part it plays on the agency scene." 

Ray Simms, Chief Timebuyer. 

Beaumont & Hoftmati, ftte. 



"We hear nothing but complimentary remarks about 
SPONSOR within the agency trade. It is definitely on 
my 'must-read' list regularly." 

Clarke Trudeau. Media Director. 

Benton & Bowies 



"SPONSOR has been on my list of home must reading 

for a long time. 

tive." 



I find it interesting as well as informa- 



George Kern. Head Timebuyer. 



N. W. Ayer 



"Everyone connected with Radio and Television advertis' 
ing should read SPONSOR. We at N. W. Ayer read it 
regularly because it keeps us posted on the latest radio 
and television activities." 

Paul Kizenberger. Timebuyer. 

Buthrauff & Byan 

"SPONSOR presents the type of factual information help- 
ful to the agency and client in dealing with radio and 
television problems. It receives thorough readership in 
our firm." 

Ross Metzger. VP & Radio Director. 



Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 



"SPONSOR is well-named for it is the only book that 
really gets down to cases with the problems directly con- 
cerning sponsors. We find it a valuable source of ideas 
and facts." 

Philip Kenney. Radio Timebuyer. 



B. B. D. & ©. 



"Because SPONSOR fills a need covered by no other 
trade paper, all of our timebuyers get SPONSOR at home ! 
where thev can read it in peace and quiet." 

Frank Silvernail. Chief Radio Timebuyer. 



ft if cf tier 



"I read SPONSOR regularly to keep up to date with the 
happenings in the radio and television field. I consider 
it an excellent medium for people who are interested in 
this phase of the advertising business." 

Dan J. Pykett. Media Director. 






William Esty Co. 



"SPONSOR talks our language and gives us invaluable 
and current information. Our office file of back copies 
of SPONSOR has proven invaluable." 

Kendall Foster, Director Television Dept. 



Sherman & Marquette 



"SPONSOR is given careful reading each issue by most 
of our key personnel. Moreover, it contains much infor- 
mation which is of permanent reference value." 

Lou Tilden, Radio Director. 



Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield 



"SPONSOR seldom fails to provide some newer, fresher, 
approach to an industry storv or problem." 

Helen Wilbur, Radio Timebuyer. 



lionig-Cooper 



"SPONSOR contains more meaty case histories of adver- 
tising in action than anv other trade publication in the 
field." 

Louis Honig, Vice President. 



Maxon 



"SPONSOR is a regular in our Maxon radio and tele- 
vision departments. It's solid reading from cover to 
cover." 

Ed Wilhelm, Timebuyer. 



Schwimmer & Seott 

"SPONSOR to me is the best in the field. As a matter 
of fact, I have almost all the copies in my files from the 
day it started publication. For radio and TV news, it 
can't be beat! I find myself constantly referring to back 
issues for information of all kinds — most particularly for 
TV growth and acceptance." 

Evelyn R. Vanderploeg. Head Timebuyer. 



Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles 



"For up-to-date complete information we consider SPON- 
SOR a must on our reading list of radio publications." 
Frank Minehan, Vice President & Media Director 



Compton 



"SPONSOR'S the answer to a need in trade papers. Every- 
one here reads it that should." 

Henry Clochessy, Head Radio Timebuyer. 



J. Walter Thompson 



"SPONSOR is a must on the recommended reading list. 
Its total audience at J. Walter Thompson far exceeds the 
number of subscriptions." 

Linnea Nelson, Head Timebuyer. 



McCann-Erichson 



"Reading SPONSOR is a must with me. It has to be. 
with so many of my associates and clients always quoting 
it. Besides, it's good reading." 

Bill Dekker, Dir. Radio Serv. & Station Relations. 



SPONSOR 



Shortest distance between buyer and seller 




I 

1' 






Any index of business in 
Metropolitan Miami reveals a 
startling upward climb through 
the years, paced by an average 
increase of 9% a year in 
population. 

It's no surprise then that the 
Miami area enjoyed its 
BIGGEST YEAR in 1950! 

Dollar turnover reported by 
local banks reached an 
astronomical 3 billion, 360 
million dollars in 1950 — 
15% ahead of last year. 



Food soles, drug store sales, 
gasoline, department stores, 
electric power — they're all well 
ahead of any year yet. 

Today, a million people in 
South Florida look to another 
BIGGEST YEAR in 1951. 



tj^y To keep your sales index 
•fr zooming with the trend, you 
^ need the radio station whose 
audience index tops all the rest. 

Let WGBS chart your 1951 
sales curve upward! 

Any Katz man will tell you bow 




CBS AFFILIATE 

MIAMI. FLORIDA 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 1 January 1951 

(Continued from page 2) 

14,000,000 RADIO SETS IN 1950— R adio set manu- 
facture during past year exceeded TV production 
2 to 1. Total of about 14,000,000 radio units 
produced in U. S. , with about 10,000,000 home 
or portable sets, rest auto sets. TV set figure 
about 7,250,000. 

GENERAL FOODS SPONSOR FOLK MUSIC RADIO PRO- 
CRAMS — Continuing popularity of old-time folk 
music and homespun humor has prompted General 
Foods to sponsor John Lair's Renfro Valley group 
over CBS with 2 separate programs starting first 
and second weeks in January. "Renfro Valley- 
Country Store" is low-budgeted Monday through 
Friday 8:30-8:45 pm series. "Renfro Valley- 
Sunday Morning Gatherin'" is Sunday 8:30 am 
show. Broadcast direct from Renfro Valley in 
the Kentucky Mountains via WHAS, Louisville, 
group has proved record of performance over WLW, 
WLS and other stations. Recently WLW decided to 
drop sophisticated-type music in belief that 
common-folks emphasis is preferred by bulk of 
listeners. Neither Renfro Valley series will be 
broadcast over New York outlet WCBS. 

HOOPER BRAND RATINGS GIVE FACTS ON TEA IN 
BOSTON — By way of illustrating operation of new 
Hooper Brand Ratings service, C. E. Hooper re- 
vealed use of major tea brands among Boston 
families. Lipton (only TV program advertiser) 
was only brand that showed more use in TV homes 
than non-TV. Lipton was top brand with use in 
about 1 in 3 homes. TV-home use was 42.8% as 
against non-TV-home use of 25.4%. Salada was 
close second with 22.5% in non-TV homes, but 
registered only 17.5% in TV homes. Hooper hopes 
to issue Brand Ratings for 100 cities, with mini- 
mum of 1,000 homes per market. 

SNADER TELESCRIPTION 3V 2 MIN. MUSIC FILMS 
COST $2,000 EACH — Production of average of 257 

TELEscription musical subject films finished 
to date cost about $2,000, according to Snader 
sources. 400 films are promised by 1 March; 
960 in all. Snader TELEscription Sales formed 
for syndicated purchase. *** 



42 



SPONSOR 




Reader Inquiries below were answered recent- 
ly by SPONSOR'S Research Dept. Answers 
are provided by phone or mail. Call MU. 
8-2772; write 510 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 



O. Can you give us the names of women radio personalities who 
have shows on stations outside of New York City? 

Advertising agency, New York 

A. Ruth Lyons, WLW, Cincinnati; Caroline Cabot, Priscilla 
Fortescue, Nancy Dixon and Mother Parker, WEEI; Marjorie 
Mills and Mildred Carlson, WBZ; Mildred Bailey. WCOP (all 
Boston); Betty Parry, WXKW, Albany; Mary Ann Lemay, 
WISN, Milwaukee; Suzanne Javeau, WWL, New Orleans; Mary 
Jones, WFIL, Philadelphia; Florence Sando, WCAE, Pittsburgh; 
Betty Scott, WARC, Rochester; Norma Lane Richards, WSPD. 
Toledo, among others. 



Q. Are Pulse surveys conducted nationally or just in New York City? 

Life insurance advertising department, New York 

A. Pulse, Inc. conducts its research interviews monthly in New 
York, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Day- 
ton, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, St. Louis, Wash- 
ington, Birmingham. Buffalo, New Orleans, Minneapolis and 
Richmond and on an every-other-month basis in Syracuse. 



Q. Are there any regularly scheduled farm and/or garden pro- 
grams on TV? Motion picture organization, Detroit 

A. These are just a few of the stations that regularly schedule 
such programs: WOW, Omaha; WOI, Ames, Iowa; and WBAP- 
TV, Ft. Worth. Ken Gapen, Chief, TV and Radio Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Washington 25. D. C, can tell you 
of others. 



Q. How many stations are now affiliated with the Progressive Broad- 
casting System? Advertising agency, Boston 

A. The Progressive Broadcasting System went on the air coast- 
to-coast on 27 November 1950 with 209 stations. Since that 
time, 33 stations have been added, now bringing the total to 242. 



Q. Where can we get a copy of the recently released 200-page sur- 
vey on all phases of the beer industry? 

Advertising agency. New York 

A. The survey you mention is the "Brewing Industry Survey- 
Fall 1950 Edition/' It can be purchased from the Research Com- 
pany of America, 341 Madison Avenue, N. Y. 



Q. Can you give us the approximate value in dollars of the 
radio/TV industry at the manufacturers level for 1950? 

Advertising agency, New York 

A. 1950 figures will not be released until January 1951 but the 
estimated value is $110,000,000. 



SEE WEED 




.^ 




WHBQ— IN THE SOUTH'S 
GREATEST MARKET 



1 JANUARY 1951 



43 



AMERICAS PIED PIPER 

(Continued from page 23) 

ished bait. 

4. For those listeners who don't 
want their neighbors to detect them 
hu\ ing rat poison. D-Con is advertised 
as "coming wrapped in a plain, un- 
marked wrapper. 

5. Frequent mention of the Middle- 
ton experiment. This small Wisconsin 
town, located about five miles from 
MadNon. v\a> plagued l>\ a huge ro- 
dent population. One family even 
moved out because of the menace. Rat- 
ner supplied the community with D- 
Con at his own expense. Two weeks 



later the rats had disappeared and have 
not been seen since. These dramatic 
lesults will also be exploited in news- 
paper ads throughout the country. 

The effect of this campaign con- 
vinced many listeners that D-Con was 
the only Warfarin product that they 
should use. One distributor told how 
farmers came into their local feed 
stores asking for this brand. Retailers 
usually tried to sell them another War- 
farin product under a different label 
that had the same composition. If any- 
thing the price was usually cheaper. 
"No. that isn't what I meant." the 
farmers would usually complain. "I 



a SOUTH HAVEN 



KALAMAZOO 



MICHIGAN 




I- 



FT. WAYNE 



iNPIANAPOLIS 



I 
I 

LIMA m 

I 

l-o 

l_ 

I 

I 1 

In 



WSBT 



FOR A Bill ION DOLLAR BONUS 



In reaching (lie- South Bend-Mishawaka trading area noth- 
ing equals WSBT. This station is a great l>u\ on any 
schedule, delivering .i half-billion dollar market .ill l>\ itself. 
BEYOND THIS. WSBT is the outstanding station 1 1 » gh- 
oul us primary area, adding anothei billion dollars to the 
WSBT market. Check it for yourself — from Sales Manage- 
ment figures and Hooperratings. (Every (TS show on 
WSBT enjoys a highei Hoopei than the network average.) 
For a tremendous bonus buy, buy WSBT. 

PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



SOOo 




want the stuff that's advertised on the 
radio. Don't try to sell me any sub- 
stitutes."' 

With many incidents like this, the 
over-all sales picture is unusually 
good. But. several stations find that 
sales fluctuate widely or that the re- 
turns are just fair. On the other hand, 
one station that only takes per-inquiry 
time purchases found the dollar vol- 
ume of orders was about three times 
the cost of the radio time. ( Marfree 
keeps away from PI deals where it can, 
Friedenberg says, because of the in- 
creased cost. He estimated that the cost 
of using one station which accepts only 
PI business is about six times what 
straight time would have cost.) 

This mail-order operation is prob- 
ably bringing Ratner a rich profit re- 
turn since 35'v to 40'v of the ra- 
dio cost is usually considered the pay- 
out point. In December, the company 
was spending about $30,000 in radio 
out of a total weekly ad budget of 
$40,000, with a return of about $100.- 
000 weekly. 

D-Con should be on an even better 
profit basis once the retail operation 
gets rolling. A reason for the shift 
away from mail order is that it is a 
more costly type of selling. One im- 
portant retail promotion advantage is 
that, on cooperative campaigns. D-Con 
money will be matched by distributors' 
funds. 

As the demand for D-Con snowballs, 
the organization has had to grow to 
keep pace. Starting with four em- 
ployees last summer, Ratner now 7 has 
100 people on his payroll, not counting 
the sales staff. The sales organization 
is headed by Jerome S. Garland, vice 
president, who was formerly with Sym- 
phonette Corp. 

The large sales for this Warfarin 
product are not only enriching Rat- 
tier s organization, but on a different 
plane, the Wisconsin Alumni Research 
Foundation is benefiting from the roy- 
alties it receives on its Warfarin pat- 
ent. These funds are ploughed back 
into research that might produce other 
important chemicals. The present 
licensees are the R. J. Prentiss Co., 
New York, and the S. B. Penick Co.. 
New York. 

Ratner' s success in the rat extermi- 
nator business caps an enterprising ca- 
reer that began when he was 17 and 
started working for his father in the 
grocer) trade. One warm day he heard 
of a truckload of bananas that were so 
ripe thej wouldn't last more than 24 



44 



SPONSOR 




where do buyers of 
spot radio time get 

their station information? 



"You fjo to the Radio Sec- 
tion* of SRDS when you 
want to find things out." 
says a long-experienced 
media man. "SRDS is really 
a manual. It informs. 



"Supposing we go into a market where we have had 
no experience, say for our frozen food account. I 
turn to SRDS first to size up the stations in that 
market. I am interested in knowing their affiliations 
and their power. If there are two stations in a 
market, both with 50.000 watts, we look at the 
rates. Then we check the coverage; and then we 
determine which station should give us the most 
for our money. 

"'When I look up the various stations in anv city 
in Standard Rate. I read everything there including 
the ads. when the\ tell me anything, like what pro- 
grams they have and how much spots on them 
cost." 

Manx stations are contributing additional informa- 
tion that helps buyers buy, in Service-Ads near 
their listings in SRDS (like the WFBR Service-Ad 
reproduced here I and near their markets listings 
in CONSUMER MARKETS. 

That s why. when you re comparing stations and 
markets, it pays to check the Service-Ads in Radio 
Advertising Rates and Data* and in CONSUMER 
MARKETS. The\ mav save vou further search for 
information you want right on the spot. 

/Vote to Broadcasters: In the 64-page SPOT RADIO 
PROMOTION HANDBOOK your advertisers and 
prospects and their agencies describe in detail what 
ihev want to know ahont stations. Copies at $1.00. 



Oil Burners 

are Hot Stuff on 

WFBR in Baltimore 

COLD FACTS: 



$60 a week spent on spots on WFBR s "Morning 
in Maryland" Show is bringing in $1500 per week in sales of oil 
burners for the Cumberland Coal Co. of Baltimore. 



Cumberland Coal Co. of Baltimore sells 
Timken Silent Automatic Heating Systems. 
They wanted to sell more. In January of this 
year they bought one minute spots on 
WFBR's great '"Morning in Maryland" Show 
fo the tune o/ $60 a week. 

They gave away no diamond rings, no trips 
to Europe. All they did was tell people, on the 
ngh t station, at the righ t time, on the 
right program, about their product 

On June 29. they wrote to tell us they're 



averaging $1500 a week in sales from this $60 
per week investment And this is the only 
radio time and station they're using' In the 
same letter, they informed us they arc doubling 
their schedule— still on "Morning in Maryland" 
— to include room air conditioners. 

"Morning in Maryland" is a WFBR "home- 
grown" show — conceived, produced and per- 
formed in WFBR's studios. There are other 
WFBR "home-growns," too — with equally 
impressive sales stories. And they all add up 
to this: in Baltimore, the right station is: 




ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE. MO 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



More than 270 radio and 7 / sta- 
tions arc running Service-Ads 
in SRDS to supplement and ex- 
pand their listings with infoi 
motion that helps bu ) ei s buy. 



The Radio Section of SRDS is now railed Radio Advertising Rotes and Data. 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE 

The National Authority Serving the Media-Buying Function 

Walter E. Botthof, Publisher 

NEW YORK • 333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois • LOS ANGELES 



LOS ANGELES 




1 JANUARY 1951 



45 



hours. After some quick negotiating, 
the youth obtained the merchandise for 
$250 and sold the fruit from his own 
truck to fruit stores and grocers until 
the whole load was disposed of for 
$1,750. 

He organized his United Enterprises 
while still attending Northwestern Uni- 
versity where he was studying account- 
ing. Operating a mail order business 
from his home, he sold such items as 
books, medicine, glow-in-the-dark gar- 
denias, and fine emery paper to re- 
move hair from otherwise pretty legs. 
One idea which brought him a fortune 



was a pocket-sized adding machine. 
"No decent-sized agency would touch 
it," he says. He finally found a very 
small agency in Chicago which took 
the account and profited. One mail- 
order promotion which showed him 
how mail order can gain distribution 
was his marketing of stainless steel 
flatware. Department store buyers and 
other retailers told the short, curly- 
haired promoter that stainless steel 
could only be sold for kitchenware. 
Ra!ner applied radio advertising for 
mail orders until the response was so 
great that he obtained distribution. 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiO*tee/l RADIO STATION 



Jfotu Many & atfoca Muck? 



1949 BMB 
Daytime 

50-100% 
19 Counties 

25-100% 
27 Counties 

10-100% 
36 Counties 



BMB Radio Prelim. Reports 1949 

Families 1950 U. S. Census Retail Sales 



101,680 517,587 279,752 



157,110 814,186 452,784 



216,220 1,115,996 610,207 



1949 BMB 
Nighttime 

50-100% 
10 Counties 

25-100% 
22 Counties 

10-100% 
31 Counties 



72,050 
128,350 



360,853 
654,711 



232,657 
373,006 



188,540 972,052 538,598 

RETAIL SALES FIGURES, "tOO" OMITTED ARE FROM SM l!S« "SURVEY OF BUYING POWER" 

The WDBJ listening habit began in 1924 — and 
has enjoyed continuous Columbia Network service 
since 1929. 



CBS • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 

Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES- WORLD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE, VA. 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



After his successes with stainless 
steel and D-Con, this young Chicago 
merchandiser has the know-how and 
the resources to make radio serve him 
even more effectively. His plans for 
launching other products indicate en- 
thusiastic faith in the medium. And 
whv not. after D-Con? * * * 



LOCAL SHOWS 

{Continued from page 10) 

the Negro population. Ballard and 
Ballard, for example, sponsor Song- 
birds of the South, a girls' quartet 
well known in the area. "In addition 
to five shows a week," says the sta- 
tion, "Ballard and Ballard can count 
on as many personal appearances in 
churches and school houses where the 
Ballard and Ballard banner is dis- 
played and their products promoted." 

The Utah Division of the Kennecott 
Copper Company uses This Business 
of Farming on KSL, Salt Lake City, to 
air a public-service program beamed 
to a regional audience. The program 
touches on news and information of 
particular interest to the people of 
Utah, has aimed to cement relations 
between agriculture and industry. 

WEBC. Duluth, features Yesterdays, 
sponsored by Peoples Brewing Com- 
pany. The program recalls interesting 
anecdotes of the past 50 years in Du- 
luth. Superior, and the surrounding 
Range cities, and frames them with 
songs that were popular at the time. 
In noting that this local slant paid off. 
distributors reported as high as 300% 
increase in sales after the first seven 
weeks of broadcasting. 

The Western Barn Dance over 
KWFT. Wichita Falls, Tex., plays to 
an average weekly audience of 1,500 
persons. The first hour of the two- 
hour local show is set up as a broad- 
cast direct from the stage of the Mu- 
nicipal Auditorium. The Westex Boot 
and Shoe Company, LeBlanc Corpora- 
tion I for Hadacol), and White's Auto 
Stores share sponsorship. * * * 



MEN, MONEY b MOTIVES 

[Continued from page 6) 

dorms, stadia, quadrangles, and so on 
I all commendable objectives), and 
then include for good measure allow- 
ance for intellectual snobbery. This 
writer once heard a member of the 
Harvard Fine Arts faculty declare with 
much vehemence that he hoped never 



46 



SPONSOR 



lo vulgarize himself by addressing over 
75 persons at one time, and as far as 
he had influence he would make that 
true of Harvard generally. How ex- 
quisite can you get? 

* * * 

Come back, though, to essentials. 
Under the American system of broad- 
casting by advertising sponsorship, a 
price is expected from the industry. 
This price goes by the over-all tag of 
'"public interest." Given intelligent and 
imaginative reality, as seems implicit 
in "Operation Frontal Lobes," the pri- 
vate enterprise way seems likely to sat- 
isfy most average citizens. 

Meantime, advertisers, agencies, 
broadcasters, talent, and all who con- 
template long years of future prosper- 
ity through television cannot blink the 
essential obligation. TV cannot be 
solely dedicated to the commercial ad- 
vantage of soaps, cigarettes, and mo'.or 
cars. -k -k -k 



AUTOMOBILES 

{Continued from page 23 I 

WNBT from 6:15 p.m. to 6:25 p.m. 
for four weeks. Marshall begins with 
simple phvsics principles. For exam- 
ple, once he started with a teeter-totter 
to illustrate operation of a lever. From 
that point he showed how the applica- 
tion of the lever force made Ford con- 
struction superior. 

Most car advertisers use both film 
and live presentations. One firm, Olds- 
mobile, has found that film used exclu- 
sively is most efficient for its across the 
board 15-minute CBS news program. 
The big pitch is on the famous high 
compression "Rocket" engine and the 
team work with the Old Hydra-Matic 
drive in the 88 model. The well-known 
"Merry Oldsmobile" is sung in all the 
messages. A clever tie-in trick is em- 
ployed by showing singers Johnny and 
Lucille riding a rocket through space 
in much the same manner as illustrated 
in magazine and newspaper advertise- 
ments. Jerry Fairbanks of Hollywood 
is currently producing Olds film an- 
nouncements using big-name film, ra- 
dio, and recording personalities along 
with Johnny and Lucille. 

The industry's drive to sell its prod- 
uct on radio and TV this season looks 
like this when broken down by spe- 
cific advertisers: 

Ford (agency: J. Walter Thompson, 
New York) is one of the top television 
advertisers on the air today, spending 



YOU MIGHT GET A 425 
POUND WHITETAIL 
DEER - 

BUT... 1 

YOU NEED THE 

FETZER STATIONS 

TO MAKE A KILLING 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 
T 

J.F you're gunning for bigger sales in Western Michigan and 
Northern Indiana, look at what WKZO, WJEF and WKZO-TV 
can give you! 

WKZO-TV is basic CBS — Channel 3. It is the only TV station 
that delivers these five large metropolitan markets representing 
more than a billion and a half dollars of buying income and 
more than 90,000 TV sets in Western Michigan and Northern 
Indiana. 

WKZO, Kalamazoo, and WJEF, Grand Rapids cost 20% less than 
the next-best two-station choice in these two cities, yet deliver 
about 57% more city listeners! New BMB figures credit WKZO- 
WJEF with a 46.7% increase in Daytime Audience and a 52.8% 
increase in Nighttime Audience since 1946. In Grand Rapids 
alone, the Fetzer stations deliver an unduplicated coverage of 
more than 60,000 homes. 

Write for all the facts today, including availabilities and some 
really impressive figures about the Western Michigan-Northern 
Indiana market. 




* Albert Tippett got one this size near Trout Isihe, Michigan. 



Wjef WKZO-TV wkzo 

ttpAm GRAND RAPIDS trf* ,M WESTERN MICHIGAN ^ m KALAMAZOO 

»"' .. »jAnvu**n»j ikiniAua Akin /IDrATFD 



and KENT COUNTY 






and GREATER 
WESTERN MICHIGAN 



ALL THREE OWf 



FETZER BROADCASTING COMPANY 
Avcry-Knodcl, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



1 JANUARY 1951 



47 



We like to be 

ON THE 
SPOT 




9 On the spot to 

Deliver CBS to one 
million people 

On the spot as 
Durham's Number 
One Station 

HOOPERWISE 
BMB-WISE 

\ 

We'd like to be put 

ON THE SPOT 

SCHEDULE OF CLIENTS 
WHO WANT RESULTS 

WDNC 



Durham, North Carolina 
5000 Watts 620 Kc 

PAUL H. RAYMER, Rep. 

48 



$130,090 monthl) <>n the networks for 
time alone. The shows include the Jack 
Haley one-hour show replacing Ka\ 
Kyser, Thursdays. 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
over NBC; one-halt hour a week of 
the daily Kukla, Fran and Ollie, 7 p.m. 
to 7:30 p.m. over NBC and the Ford 
Theater. Fridays. ') p.m. to 10 p.m.. 
CBS. This dramatic show, costing 
about $25,500 weekly for production 
and talent, is handled through Kenyon 
& Eckhardt. New ^ ork, for institution- 
al advertising. 

Ford Dealers who sponsored the Kav 
Kyser I TV I zany quiz show were dis- 
satisfied with the low ratings of the 
program when they thought of the 
S25.000 talent and production budget. 
1 lic\ preferred, instead, the relaxed 
Jack Haley who headed the summer 
replacement show for Kyser. 

To launch its "51 models. Ford has 
pumped large funds into radio 1>\ par- 
ticipating in NBC's Operation Tandem 
and a saturation announcement cam- 
paign. The tandem shows include The 
Big Show. Sundays. 6 p.m. to 7:30 
p.m.; The Man Called A. Saturdays. 
8:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.: Duffy's Tavern. 
Fridays, 9:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Screen 
Director's Playhouse. Thursdays. 10 
p.m. to 11 p.m., and the NBC Sym- 



phony. Monday s. 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. 
A special four-week campaign of sing- 
ing commercials presented by opera 
stars supplemented the shows. During 
the year. Ford also used announce- 
ments on 1.225 stations, messages were 
read by such well-known people as 
Clem McCarthy . the turf expert, and 
Dr. Roy K. Marshall. 

The Ford dealers are using radio 
and TV extensively at the local level. 
In the New York-New England area, 
dealers put up a half-million dollars 
for advertising the "51 models on vid- 
eo. They signed for four new pro- 
grams and continued two others that 
they were already using. 

Chevrolet I agency : Campbell-Ewald. 
Detroit) used a series of 80 three-min- 
ute radio recordings for its '51 model 
that required a whole new rate card. 
Ethel Merman. Cinny Sims, and Lau- 
ritz Melchior arc among the personal- 
ities who sing the "See the U.S.A.' 
melody in this saturation campaign. 

Although the company has used 
some 15 TV shows during the last three 
years, it is not sponsoring a network 
video program now. Telecasting spe- 
cial events such as the Notre Dame 
games and a special CBS-TV news 
roundup New Year's day is the present 




BRINGING MORE JINGLE 

TO KANSAS 

CASH REGISTERS 



WREN 

T P E K A 



ABC 

5000 WATTS 



WEED & CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




SPONSOR 









strategy. (The radio version of the 
roundup was presented the Sunday be- 
fore New Years. ) A heavy saturation 
series of TV spots was used in about 
100 cities featuring their well-known 
Guber character (see sponsor, 23 Oct., 
1950) . An example of one teaser com- 
mercial was a film which showed the 
little character staring rapturously in- 
to space. To the curious passers by he 
explained that he was looking at the 
' new 1951 Chevrolet which only he 
could see because of his ultra-violet 
eyes. He described "the beautiful new 
lines of the car" for those standing 
around him. "You'll be able to see it 
Oct. 1 at your Chevrolet dealer," he 
emphasized at the end of film. 

Chevrolet dealers are pouring large 
sums into video as well. The New York 
dealers, for example, allotted about 
$250,000 to present sports from Madi- 
son Square Garden this season over 
WPIX. ( Because of production uncer- 
tainties, this schedule, which began 15 
October, is being dropped 16 January, 
two and one-half months earlier than 
planned.) 

Buick (agency: Kudner, New York) 
is making one of the largest of the in 
and out saturation campaigns with 
$100,000 worth of time and talent on 
six ABC radio shows during the week 
of Jan. 14-20. Another $30,000 is go- 
ing to NBC for participations on Tan- 
dem. Buick will launch its '51 models 
with a segment of Stop the Music, Sun- 
day, Jan. 14, 8 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Met- 
ropolitan Opera Auditions of the Air, 
Tuesday, Jan. 16, 8:30 to 9 p.m.; 
Screen Guild Players, Tuesday, Jan. 
18, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Johnny Desmond 
Goes to College, Monday. Jan. 15, 9:30 
p.m. to 10 p.m.; The Fat Man, Wed- 
nesday. Jan. 17, 8:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., 
and What Makes You Tick with Gypsy 
Rose Lee, Saturday, Jan. 20, 9 to 9:30 
p.m. (all ABC). 

Buick, out of network TV at present, 
made an expensive plunge last year 
with Olsen and Johnson. The show 
was far from an overwhelming success. 
Since it dropped Olsen and Johnson, 
the General Motors firm has looked in- 
to other TV ventures without making 
any commitments. 

Chrysler ( agency : McCann-Erick- 
son, New York) is plannig to buy four 
CBS radio shows. These will include 
Hal Peary, a half hour of Songs for 
Sale, Rate Your Mate and Lineup. 

Until last December, Chrysler had 
been sponsoring Treasury Men in Ac- 
tion on television. At this point the 



company is holding back in the selec- 
tion of a replacement. 

DeSoto-Plymouth Dealers (agency: 
Batten, Barton. Durstine & Osborn, 
New York) has been the outstanding 
advertiser on radio with Groucho Marx 
on You Bet Your Life, Wednesday. '' 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m., NBC. The move of 
the top notch comedian into radio not 
only pleased the DeSoto dealers but 
was a powerful shot in the arm for the 
whole medium. Last fall, the sponsor 
added a separate TV version on Thurs- 
days, 8 to 8:30 p.m. over NBC. The 



radio show talent and production costs 
are about $10,000 weekly. The cost 
of filming the radio program for video 
adds another $6,000 or more. 

De Soto also plans a heavy announce- 
ment campaign for both radio and TV. 

Dodge (agency: Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
New York ) is spending about $22,500 
for the American National Theater 
Academy's Showtime U.S.A., ABC-TV, 
Sundays, 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. This big 
name variety show is bucking Lu< k\ 
Strike's This Is Shoiv Business, CBS, 
I Please turn to page 62) 



A*,,., " """* tor 

""«<* tort CATEa OR l( ,, 

Wished ? ATEG ORJCA t 



Pro. 



tu mti 



»JJ1« 



BROADCAST MUSIC,INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



1 JANUARY 1951 



49 






DC&S 

{Continued from page 31) 

companies best equipped to produce 
any given job at reasonable cost. He 
would also he able to supervise actual 
production." 

Russ Ambruster, most recent addi- 
tion to the radio/TV department, spe- 
cializes in radio. His principle job is 
directing commercials and generally 
supervising the daily half-hour AM 
broadcasts of Break the Bank (NBC). 
Ambruster also follows through on 
production of the agency's many re- 
corded announcements. 

Rounding out the department's 10- 
man staff are Seymour Lein, a gen- 
eral assistant in radio and TV produc- 
tion; Marie Burns, who routes scripts, 
memos and the like; and a group of 
secretaries and typists. 

One reason for the radio/TV depart- 
ment's small size is DC&S's decision to 
keep all timebuying in the media de- 
partment. Agency thinking on this ar- 
rangement is explained by Bill Steers, 
the partner who supervises media buy- 
ing. Says Steers: "Buying time is an 
art in itself. It has little or no direct 



relationship to the creative functions 
of a radio and television group. ' 
Timebuying is done by Helen Wilbur 
under the general direction of Sam 
Frey, vice president in charge of me- 
dia. Miss Wilbur selects stations and 
schedules with the help of Esther Ojala 
and Carol Sleeper, two assistants who 
also specialize in broadcast advertis- 
ing. 

A recent switch in advertising tac- 
tics by Reid's Ice Cream, a DC&S cli- 
ent, illustrates how the agency tackles 
a job. In the fall of 1949, the agency's 
planning group sat down around a ta- 
ble. It was a large gathering, by 
DC&S standards. President Lawrence 
Shenfield was there, along with Joel 
Jacobs (account supervisor), Frank 
Dowd ( account representative I , Sam 
Frey of media, merchandising direc- 
tor William Holden, research director 
E. A. Raynolds, and Chester Mac- 
Cracken. 

Reid's had been in television back in 
1946 on CBS, later dropped the me- 
dium. It was time, thought the plan- 
ning group, that Reid's got back into 
TV. Surveys had shown that, although 
heat-smitten New Yorkers gulped down 



more ice cream in the summer than at 
any other time of the year, winter con- 
sumption of the cold dessert was con- 
siderable. As for television, New York 
had many times more sets in 1949 
than in 1946; it was definitely a good 
bet. 

The planning group's recommenda- 
tions to Reid's: spread advertising ex- 
penditures over the whole year and 
earmark a substantial part of the ad 
budget for TV. The client agreed and 
beginning in 1950 made television the 
main advertising effort. After a year's 
trial, Reid's elected to continue that 
policy in 1951. 

With the decision to use TV, DC&S 
had a production job on its hands. 
An animated spoon character was al- 
ready being used in newspaper and 
billboard advertising. It was decided 
to use this Reid's "trademark"' in an 
animated film commercial, at the same 
time following the "Reid's is the Taste 
of the Town'' copy theme. 

At this point, most agencies would 
write a script and turn it over to a film 
producer to finish the job. That's not 
the DC&S method, however. Rod Al- 
bright prefers to do as much of the 




PROGRESSIVE 

BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

THE SYMBOL OF PROGRESS... AGAIN IN '51 

Twelve hours of Radio's Greatest programming . . . featuring the outstanding 
stars of the entertainment world ... 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily . . . eoast to coast 



NEW YORK 

HOTEL PARK SHERATON 
JUDSON 6-3526 



CHICAGO 

666 LAKE SHORE DRIVE 
SUPERIOR 7-6613 



HOLLYWOOD 

8983 SUNSET BOULEVARD 
BRADSHAW 2-5841 



50 



SPONSOR 



pre-production work as possible in the 
agency. First, an animated film special- 
ist was called in to help with planning 
the films. (One a minute long, the oth- 
er 20 seconds.) 

Once Chester MacCracken, the ani- 
mation specialist, Rod Albright, and 
the copywriters had sorted out and 
written down some likely ideas for the 
films, rough story boards and scripts 
were drawn up. President Shenfield 
and the account men gave their o.k. 
and finished story boards were made 
by the film company, Film Graphics. 
Story boards and final copy were then 
submitted to William Ward. Reid's ad- 
vertising manager. He and company 
executives approved, told DC&S to g© 
ahead with the films. 

First step in producing the film was 
recording a sound track. Quite often 
a well known musical arranger is hired 
to turn out original music. In this 
particular case, however, Bob Smock 
fitted words to a familiar tune — "I'm 
Called Little Buttercup" from Gilbert 
& Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore." This 
tune was especially well adapted to the 
jingle lyrics to be used and it also 
helped to keep production costs down. 
Using it followed one of Smock's work- 
ing rules: take the familiar and give it 
a fresh twist. Bob Smock's jingle went 
this way: 

Each flavor we capture 

Will fill you with rapture 

For Reid's is a name of renown 

So richly we cream it 

We hope you tvill deem it 

The creamiest taste of the town. 

With sound track recorded and 
timed, Film Graphics began drawing 
the hundreds of individual sketches 
that go into producing an animated 
film. Next, the showing of a rough 
cut, then testing the completed com- 
mercials over a closed circuit, and 
finally delivering the films for broad- 
cast. This whole process is being re- 
peated now for new Reid spot an- 
nouncements to be scheduled early 
this year. 

When live-action films are to be pro- 
duced, Rod Albright solicits bids from 
two or three companies he knows to be 
expert at the type job that is to be 
done. Having chosen one, he specifies 
the cameraman and director in the 
contract. "I would no more think of 
placing an order without this specifi- 
cation," says Rod Albright, "than one 
of our art directors would order a 
painting or photograph without speci- 



fying the artist or photographer." 



Albright also does the casting. 



with 



help from talent agents. Photographs 
of the prospective cast are submitted 
to the client, keeping all approval 
problems from the film producer. The 
actors are then hired by the agency 
and go on its payroll while filming is 
underway. Then, too, DC&S' film di- 
rector will often commission a free- 
lance scene painter to do a set for one 
of the commercials. It's delivered to 
the film producer's studio, ready for 
use. If there is an incidental produc- 



tion job like this, Albright likes to da 
it himself. He feels the producer 
should be free to devote his full time 
and attention to shooting the film. 

This system seems to be working 
fine. Producers like to deal with agen- 
cyrnen who know the film business. 
They also like being relieved of the 
annoying detail which slows down pro- 
duction. 

DC&S is quite heavily engaged in 
TV. Besides the Reid's ice cream cam- 
paign just mentioned, they have also 
worked on television programs and an- 




WNAX 



SELLS MORE... 



because IT TELLS MORE 



Within the boundaries of Minnesota, the Dakotas, Nebraska and 
Iowa lies a 267 BMB-county area known as Big Aggie Land. It's 
a major market with an after-taxes buying income of $3.9-billion 
— greater than San Francisco, Philadelphia or Washington, D. C. 
Retail sales in this richest of all agricultural areas run to $2.9- 
billion — greater than Los Angeles, Detroit or St. Louis. 

A diary study conducted this year by Audience Surveys, Inc., 
reaffirms WNAX leadership. Fifty-two stations received mention 
in the study. But WNAX received top rating in 439 (88%) of 
the 500 quarter-hours studied. This is more than ten times the 
number of 'wins' granted the second station. Listeners like WNAX 
best 89% of all daytime quarter-hours . . . 84% of all evening 
quarter-hours. 

You gotta tell 'em to sell 'em . . . and WNAX TELLS 'EM! 
That's why WNAX has a list of sales success stories as long as 
your arm. Most likely there is one for your type of product or 
service. Your nearest Katz man will show you how WNAX alone 
can sell for you in Big Aggie Land. Call him today. 



WNAX-570 

YANKTON - SIOUX CITY 

570 Kc ■ 5,000 Watts rf frwU* Station 




REPRESENTED BY KATZ 



AFFILIATED WITH A.B.C. 



1 JANUARY 1951 



51 



nouncement schedules for Horton's ice 
cream. Vitalis. Ipana. and more recent- 
ly Welch's Grape Juice. 

When the agency looks for a pro- 
gram on television I AM too. for that 
matter I it leans heavily on package 
productions. This enables MacCrack- 
en to keep flown the size of his depart- 
ment by leaving routine program pro- 
duction to the package producer. This 
doesn't mean that the agency stops 
worrying about a show once it's been 
bought from a packager. On the 
Break the Bank program, for example. 



they added an orchestra to give it that 
"big show" feeling. And later thev in- 
troduced the "Wishbowl" from which 
listeners' post cards are drawn weekly. 
Bert Parks calls those whose cards are 
drawn, invites them to make a free 
trip to the show in New York. Rod 
Albright. Russ Ambruster. and Sy 
Lein are all on hand at the NBC 
siudio during each Break the Bank TV 
performance. Department chief Mac- 
Cracken usually stands by, too. on 
Wednesday nights at 10:00 p.m. 

DC&S clients with small ad budgets 



iOiWU hoUstkQm! 




. . . another reason why 

WMBD has more listeners 
than the next 2 

Peoria stations combine 



Skillful local programming with widely popular personalities makes WMBD 
the winner in prosperous Peoriarea. Throughout the broadcasting day (and 
night), a steady parade of these and other interesting people receives a warm- 
hearted welcome in the dominant slice of Peoriarea homes. 

CHUCK BARNHART, Program Director has been in radio since 1938 . . with WMBD since 1947 
(recently he was named Peoria's "Outstanding Young Man of 1949"). Whimsical and with a fine sense 
of thr dramatic, einnk also lias his own immensely popular "Chuck Barnnart Show." 

BROOKS WATSON, News Director — With WMBD iinci L937 Brooks' ability and popularity reached 
i., i beyond Peoria during his Army career. With the rank ol Lieutenant Colonel, he »as Chief of the 
itiiii,, Section In the ETO . . . worked with both networks and the BBC. Back home now, he's Peoria's 
t avoi it< newscaster. 

PHIL GIBSON. Local News Editor — 29 years experience as a reporter, columnist, newscaster and news 
editor! Peorians like their news fresh as their morning eggs— and Phil Gibson gives II to them 
and accurately. 

EMIL BILL. Farm Editor brings shownmanship to the farm. Raised on a faun, he later trouped 28 

years In vaudeville circuits -thus makes the • bination easy' Witty, personable and down to earth, he's 

.ith mi al audienci 



ASK FREE& PETERS 




know that the same men who guide 
mass-selling Bristol-Myers products on 
Wednesday night are working on their 
campaigns Thursday morning. That's 
undoubtedly a consideration in the 
minds of smaller clients who have be- 
come DC&S customers. Although the 
agency is not a giant in the tradition 
of J. Walter Thompson or \ oung & 
Rubicam. it has the top-notch talent to 
do a competent job. By supplementing 
its own staff with outside experts, when 
needs arise, the agency has been able 
to avoid many expensive accretions — 
program producers, musical arrangers, 
large staffs of illustrators, and so on. 
It must work; Bristol-Myers is still hap- 
py after a six-year partnership and the 
agency keeps adding accounts. * * * 



BEN CRAUER 

I Continued from page 27 I 

"He used to take me out in the cor- 
ridor." Grauser says, "and drill me on 
my lines, comma by comma." 

What advertising tyrants and com- 
mercial drill masters forget, Grauer 
believes, is that it's impossible to 
create a fine blending of show and 
commercial in the agency conference 
room and then put it out on the air as 
originally conceived. "The studio is 
the battle ground." he says. The ma- 
jor it v of agency people he's worked 
with understand the way a show is put 
together and allow Grauer the room 
he feels he needs to work in. 

"It is important," Grauer says, "to 
catch the mood of what comes just be- 
fore the commercial. If there's been a 
rising note from the orchestra, then 
one word in similar key may be all 
you need to get into it. Or you may 
need a whole sentence for transition. 
The point is you can't be held down to 
a commercial that may have been pre- 
pared months before and then do a 
blended job." 

Grauer is sensitive, too, about the 
flow of the commercial itself. He's 
rewritten whole commercials, on oc- 
casion. I with agency permission I lo 
put them into his own style. 

Grauer draws a sharp line, however, 
between modifying commercial copj 
for better deliverv and tampering with 
the sales points. "It's the agency's job 
in develop the copj themes. My job is 
figuring out lion to put them over." 

And even the how may be up to the 
(bent completer) if there's a particular 
aspect of selling strategy involved. 



52 



SPONSOR 



"For example, there was an agency 
man I worked with on a soap several 
years ago. He coached me on the com- 
mercials week after week until I real- 
ized that he was after a certain homey 
approach to fit the product and the 
campaign. From that point on, I got 
into their groove automatically." 

Slogans, too, he feels, should be in- 
violate. "If you're selling the 'only 
hemstitched ear muffs' and 'hem' is 
the syllable they want emphazised, then 
you hit 'hem' hard. They know their 
market and their competitors and have 
probably worked months over those 
three or four words." 

Where lack of flexibility hurts the 
most. Grauer says, is in transcribing 
one-minute announcements. "The copy 
comes into the recording studio," he 
explains, "written according to a theo- 
retical word count of 160 to a minute. 
You pick it up and read it and it runs 
66 seconds or 70. Then you take it 
again and gallop. Maybe you get it 
all in, but the whole effect is liable to 
be anxious and rattling." 

"At that point," says Grauer, "it's 
obvious the copy must be cut. Invari- 
ably, it turns out that no one there has 
'the authority to touch the copy and 
you have to either jam the whole thing 
in anyway or make a trans-Atlantic 
phone call to get permission to lop off 
12 words — meanwhile wasting expen- 
sive studio time." 

Grauer thinks that all short an- 
nouncements should reach the per- 
former with brief optional cuts indi- 
cated so that such hocus-pocus can be 
eliminated. 

"And, most important for any type 
of production, whether it's a transcrip- 
tion or a network show, the agency 
man in charge should have direct au- 
thority. The most inefficient coordina- 
tion you can get grows out of a situa- 
tion where the agency man is not 
delegated to make decisions." 

A short time ago, Grauer did voice- 
over narration for an automobile com- 
pany to go with its film commercials 
on television. The commercials were 
written in Detroit, rehearsed in New 
York. Frequently, it turned out that 
the lines Grauer was to read did not 
coordinate with the film. 

"When I was talking about the plush 
upholstery, you'd see a shot of the 
chromium outside the car. But the 
agency man in New York absolutely 
could not make a decision to touch 
that copy. We used to spend several 
hours, at $50 a half hour for the spe- 

1 JANUARY 1951 



cial projector, trying to iron the thing 
out." 

In general, television commercials 
surprise Ben Grauer. Two years ago, 
when commercial programs ceased be- 
ing a rarity, he anticipated that TV 
commercials would be unpleasant to 
look at. "I was verj wrong because 
most of them nowadays are very clev- 
er. They've gone on from the straight 
demonstration scene to tricky film 
effects." 

But Grauer anticipates that a point 
will come some day in TV commercials 



where trick effects will have outworn 
their welcome. He feels that you can't 
go on indefinitely piling filmed gim- 
mick after gimmick. At that point, 
television "will bring back a vanishing 
American type — the guy who can talk 
his way through anything, the think- 
on-his-feet salesman." 

Agencies have been afraid of trust- 
ing the commercial to a live salesman 
and have used filmed scenes frequently 
to prevent fluffs. Grauer looks back 
on his own career I he's famous for 
quick recoveries from fluffs I and won- 



! 



SPONSOR 

SIO MADISON AVENUE. NEW YORK 22, NY. MURRAY HILL 8-2772 



NORMAN R.GLENN 
EDITOR AND P R e S I O E t 



December 13, 1950 



Mr. Harry B. Maizlish 
KFWB 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Dear Harry: 

I'm sure the entire broadcasting industry, including 
buyers as well as broadcasters, feel as I do about your 
acquisition of KFWB. 

I'm deelighted! 

Through the years Harry Maizlish has stood for showman- 
ship in radio and outstanding public service. Now that 
you're the owner, Harry, I'm sure you'll show us even 
more of the same. 



Regards. 



NRG/abs 



ijincerely, 



53 



ders whether the fear of slip-ups makes 
sense. 

"In the first place, all that worry 
about mistakes creates tension and the 
tension causes the mistakes. Besides 
that, the mistakes are never as impor- 
tant as the people in the studio think." 

The worst error Grauer can recall in 
connection with a commercial hap- 
pened on a show for a hair oil sponsor. 
Grauer gave his commercials from a 
closed-off booth, to get an echo effect. 
One night he started reading his com- 
mercial on cue, but into a dead mike. 



The engineer was five seconds late in 
throwing the switch. 

"Definitely, that meant a long, dead 
pause until the audience heard me 
somewhere in the first half of the com- 
mercial. So you can imagine the hub- 
bub after the show. But I'm sure that 
to the audience at home it wasn't a 
matter of life and death. Americans 
are pretty mechanical minded and 
most families probably just commented 
that someone had forgotten to throw 
a switch and forgot the whole thing. " 

How does Grauer think he'd do as a 




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casual, off-the-cuff television sales- 
man? The reply: a shrug of the 
shoulders, a passing gleam (probably 
at the thought of Godfrey's millions), 
and a "could be." 

In radio, Grauer is an exponent of 
"personality first, voice second." He 
thinks that sponsors should follow 
three rules in choosing an announcer 
and integrating him into a radio show: 

1. "Think of the show as a unit, 
then find an announcer with the per- 
sonality to fit the show. Bob Hope, 
for example, appeals to a certain type 
of listener. The announcer ought to 
appeal to the same kind of people." 
(Woodbury soap reasoned that would 
be Ben Grauer when they sponsored 
Bob Hope from New York. ) 

2. "Forget pure voice quality and 
whether the voice is deep or light. 
The beauty of the voice means little. 
It's the personality that's projected 
which is important." 

3. "Find a way to use the an- 
nouncer's name. When you give him a 



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54 



SPONSOR 



by-line, he becomes part of the show. 
That increases his interest in the show 
and the commercials." 

Where possible, Grauer believes the 
sponsor should invite the man who 
sells for him over the air to the com- 
pany's annual sales conference or con- 
vention. That accomplishes two things. 
First, the company salesmen become 
more conscious of the advertising sup- 
port they're getting over the air. Sec- 
ond, the radio announcer gets a better 
understanding of the product. 

"It's a hard thing to put into 
words," Grauer says, "but I recall that 
after going through a chewing gum 
sponsor's plant, the whole job meant 
more to me. I felt that I really knew 
the product then." 

Whether the announcer goes through 
the sponsor's plant or not, Grauer 
thinks he should get a look into the 
company's over-all thinking on adver- 
tising strategy. "Let him understand 
the campaign. Explain who the market 
is so that he'll be able to vary his ap- 
proach accordingly." 

Though Grauer wants to understand 
the product he's selling so that he can 
do his best job with it, he resents the 
advertising executive who expects him 



to live, eat, and breathe it. "You get 
an occasional ad man who, after long 
years of service, has become so fana- 
tical about a cereal that he anticipates 
a similar interest from the performer. 
But I draw the line at wearing a button 
in my lapel or something on that or- 
der." 

The over-enthusiasm of some spon- 
sors is expressed in a more direct 
manner. "One of the worst plagues of 
all the performing arts is the client 
who wants you to shout, or whisper, 
or enunciate out of your nose — any- 
thing to make his message stand out 
and dominate the show enough so that 
it can't be missed. Over-enthusiasm 
of this type leaves you with a com- 
mercial that may completely lack sell- 
ing psychology. And that is what the 
agency should prevent. It should func- 
tion as a kind of buffer between the 
selling enthusiasm of the client and the 
performing skill of the talent so that 
the show stays a show." 

Grauer qualifies as an expert on the 
sponsor-to-program relationship — if 
nothing else in terms of the number 
of sponsors he's had over the past 20 
years. He set the record for the longest 
single association of an announcer 



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1 JANUARY 1951 



55 



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with a single program by spending 16 
years with Walter Winchell (for Jer- 
gen's I . He's been on the air simul- 
taneously for as many as half a dozen 
national advertisers and the some 200 
products he's sold have ranged from 
Mum and Vitalis to General Motors 
automobiles and Firestone tires. But. 
more important. Grauer is thoughtful 
as well as nimble with his vocal cords. 
Though an old Rotary legend warns 
that business sense is not found in 
heads that turn to book collecting and 
archeology (two of Grauer's hobbies), 
Grauer's judgment on commercial ra- 
dio problems is backed up by hard- 
headed fiscal logic. He's his own agent 
I and a good one as anyone who's ever 
heard him closing a deal on the tele- 
phone can testify). 

When Grauer turns away from the 
day-to-day problems of putting sales 
points across, he occasionally reflects 
on the ethics of advertising. He has a 
close personal understanding of the 
power of radio to reach millions of 
people at the same time — and a dis- 
taste for the misuse of that power. 
Driving for a quick killing on a prod- 
uct that has dubious value will hurt ad- 
ertising in the long run. he's inclined 
to tell friends who kid him about radio 
over a drink at Toots Shor's. "Adver- 
tising men know that nowadays." he 
says, "and there is actually a code of 
restraint among the majority. Actual- 
ly, advertising is a handmaiden of dis- 
tribution — a tremendously important 
factor in the American economic pic- 
ture. It makes our high standard of 
living possible. You can't kick that 
around." 

During the last war. Grauer, like 
many other advertising and radio peo- 
ple, put his talents to use selling bonds 
($12,000,000 worth by government 
reckoning). If war comes again. 
Grauer feels that radio and television 
w ill ha\ i' ;m e\ en more impoi taut job 
to do in fighting Communism on an 
idea level. "I've had the experience, 
while covering news events, of seeing 
the true nature of Russian diplomacy 
in action. At the Peace Conference in 
Paris in '46. I reported how Russian 
tactics were preventing constructive 
action. When I did the reporting for 
the telecasts of the Security Council 
lasl summer. I saw first hand how 
Russian delegate Malik used the Hit- 
lerian technique of the big lie to ham- 
mer away at American arguments. For 
the five million people who saw the 
telecasts. I lliink this was the best 



anti-Communist propaganda possible:" 
Grauer commented on a recent pro- 
posal by SPONSOR that advertisers 
might join the idea battle against Com- 
munism through their sponsored pro- 
grams. "Programs dramatizing Amer- 
ican ideals could be highly effective if 
they were properly controlled in some 
way. The sponsorship angles would 
have to be handled in good taste to 
prevent a situation where the drama is 
on the high level of principle and 
ideals and the commercial is self-seek- 
ing direct sell." 

What about programs on television 
in which the know-how of commercial 
performers might be blended with the 
problem of educating civilians in first 
aid. conservation, or civil defense? 
Could Grauer, for example, do that 
kind of job? 

The answer was yes. with en- 
thusiasm — with the same enthusiasm 
Grauer's brought to handling strictly 
commercial problems for sponsors 
over the past 20 years. • * * 



SELL SQ&P! 




56 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 35) 



to make the ove 



r-all tost differential on 



a regional or national campaign a sub- 
stantial one. 

There is no question of television's 
ability to weather the vicissitudes of a 
wartime economy. 

William H. Weldon 

President 

Blair-TV Inc. 

New York 



I anticipate the 
broad develop- 
ment, during 
1951, of a defi- 
nite trend which 
has been appar- 
ent in AM broad- 
casting for the 
past year-and-a- 
half. I refer spe- 
cifically to the 
greatly increased 
of local AM station broadcasting 




In national advertisers. 

In the past the national advertiser 
could rely on the impart of dominant 
network broadcasting to exploit his 
merchandise and cement relations with 
distributors and local dealers. How- 
ever, the inroads of TV on national 
advertising appropriations has already 
caused the cancellation of several im- 
portant national network programs 
and doubtless will result in many more. 

Assuming always, of course, that 
world conditions will not develop to 
the point where there is a dearth of 
merchandise for public consumption. 



the national advertiser must continue 
to cooperate with his dealer organiza- 
tions with local or point of sale ad- 
vertising. The short spot announce- 
ment, so popular in the past, has great- 
ly increased in cost, production-wise 
and use-wise. 

I believe that 195] will see a greatly 
increased use of 15-minute AM pro- 
grams in local communities, such pro- 
grams to be produced locally by the 
radio station. The tools for such pro- 
duction are all available to the local 
station and the advertiser. These tools 
are furnished by the transcribed pro- 




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510 MADISON 

[Continued from page 18) 

Mr. Landry is right when he says 
"some PR operators have openly ped- 
dled PR as a substitute for advertis- 
ing" but their number is smaller than 
the ad agencies and space salesmen 
who have sold advertising on the ba- 
sis of "free" editorial mention. Any 
businessman who believes either of 
these stories is out looking for bar- 
gains and deserves his certain fate. 
You can't cheat an honest man. 

But, just as it is true that advertising 
can do a better job than PR in some 
instances, the converse is equally valid. 
American publications divide their 
white space into separate columns. 
Some space is for sale; some cannot 
be purchased at any price. 

Take sponsor, for example. We 
have planted — to use Mr. Landry's 
term — stories which sponsor has pub- 
lished, sponsor's editors know we 
work for commercial clients, yet the 
question of advertising in SPONSOR has 
never entered the conversations. Does 
this mean the editors of sponsor are 
stupid or corrupt? 

Not at all! It means that sponsor 
is following the best publishing prac- 
tices. Its editorial space is not deter- 
mined by anything in the advertising 
columns. As for "sliding a few last 
ones" past these editors — just try it, 
Mr. Landry, try it. 

Mr. Landry will find that the same 
practice prevails in any medium worth 
the advertiser's dollar. Strangely 
enough, the more severely a medium 
follows this principle, the more adver- 
tising it attracts. 

Definitions of news vary widely. One 
editor may think that a health cam- 
paign sponsored by an insurance com- 
pany is a commercial venture; another 
{Please turn to page 601 




58 



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THE TELEVISION AUTHORITY 

(Continued from page 28) 

IV. Announcers and performers in dramatized commercials 
(Rates for one insert per show. Extra rehearsal $5 an hour} 



More than five lines 
Length of program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
31 to 60 minutes 

Five lines or less 
Length of program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
51 to 60 minutes 



Total fee Rehearsal hours included 
$60 3 

75 4 

90 5 

(Extra rehearsal $5 an hour I 

Total fee Rehearsal hours included 

$50 4 

62.50 6 

75 9 



^oice-over announcers (Extra rehearsal J 

Vlore than 10 lines 

Length of Program Total fee 

15 minutes or less $50 

16 to 30 minutes 90 
51 to 60 minutes 125 



an hour) 

Rehearsal hours 
3 
4 
6 



10 lines or less ( Extra rehearsal $5 an hour ) 

Length of Program Total fee Rehearsal hours 

15 minutes or less $50 2 

16 to 30 minutes 62.50 3 
SI to 60 minutes 75 4 

Vlultiple Performances Per Week 

i 

i 2 performances per week at l 3 /4 times the single rate 

3 performances per week at 2 x /\ times the single rate 

4 performances per week at 2% times the single rate 
' 5 performances per week at 3 times the single rate 

V. Choruses (Soloists receive performer's scale. Extra re 
hearsal $3.50 an hour I 

Chorus Dancers — Fee per performer — 

3 4 5 6 



Length of 
program 

(5 min. or less 
16 to 30 
51 to 60 



Rehearsal 2 
hours 



12 

24 
40 



$82 
112 
137 



110 
135 



108 
133 



$76 
106 
131 



$74 
104 
129 



7 8 
or more 

$72 $70 
102 100 
127 125 



Rehearsal must he within the following number of consecutive 
days, one day of which is the day of broadcast: 

15-minute program, within three days 
30-minute program, within five days 
60-minute program, within six days 

Chorus singers [On or off camera. Extra rehearsal $3.50 nn 
hour I 



Length of program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
1 to 60 minutes 

1 JANUARY 1951 



Fee per performer 

regardless of No. Rehearsal hours 

$45 4 

60 6 

75 10 



Multiple performances per week, same show: 

1%. times the single rate for 2 performances a week 
2 l /i times the single rate for 3 performances a week 
2% times the single rate for 4 performances a week 
3 times the single rates for 5 performances a week 

VI. Specialty ads (Extra rehearsal $5 an hour i 

1 performer— $200 

2 performer — 275 

3 performer — 375 

4 performer — 475 

$100 for each additional performer. 

Above rates include six hours of rehearsal within two days, 
one of which shall be day of performance. 

VII. Sportscasters. Sports are divided into two categories: 
class A which is baseball, football and major boxing; class B 
which is all other sports. 

Sportscasters' fee: Class A — $200 per event, or $550 per week 
of seven events of the same sport; Class B — $150 
or $350 per week. 



per event. 



Assistant sportscasters and lor color men : Class A — $125 per 
event, or $350 per week; Class B — $100 per event, or $225 per 
week. 



VIII. Walk-ons and extras (Extra rehearsal $3 an hour, re- 
hearsal on two days or less, one to be show day) 



Length of Program 

15 minutes or less 

16 to 30 minutes 
31 to 60 minutes 



Total fee Rehearsal hours 



$20 
35 
45 



IX. Live signature numbers (Extra rehearsal at $3 an hour) 
$40 per performer including dress rehearsal 



X. Cut-ins, hitch-hikes and cow-catchers. A fee of $50, per 
announcement, but not to exceed the fee payable to an an- 
nouncer on the whole program. Rehearsal, if required, to be 
paid at the performer's rate. 

XI. Minimum Call. A 3-hour minimum call will be granted, 
except on strip programs if rehearsal is called immediately be- 
fore or after the program. 



XII. Kinescope recordings to supplement the live network 
can be played within 60 days of the original telecast, but only 
in areas where the program was not previously broadcast. TV A 
intends to establish restrictions on the showing of a kinescope 
in any area where the program was previously carried. Pend- 
ing the working out of such restrictions, no kinescope will be 
shown in any area where the program was previously carried, 
without the written consent of TVA. 



XIII. Sustaining rate 809/ of above fees. 



* * + 



59 



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And the world 

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And wish you a 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 



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NOT ONE, BIT SEVEN MAJOR INDUSTRIES 



250 Watts 

Night & Day 

ANACONDA 

BUTTE 




"Well pleased with sineere 
ami enthusiastic manner in 
which commercials are being 
bandied . . . your fine mer- 
chandising help has added 
to success of campaign." 
That's what one major agen- 
cy wrote us recently concern- 
ing one of their clients par- 
ticipation on KQV's "Wom- 
an's Exchange," with Jane 
Gibson. There are a few 
availabilities on this popu- 
lar Monday through Friday 
(I : 40-2:00) show. For de- 
tails, see Weed & Co. 



KQY 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MBS — 5,000 Watts — 1410 



510 MADISON 

I Continued from page 58) 

ma) view it as a public service. There 
are differences of opinion on the news 
value of a new model of washing ma- 
chine, the price of milk, or "Miss Ma- 
terials Handling of 1950'" but Mr. Lan- 
dry is naive if he believes editors are 
hoodwinked or bribed into carrying 
the stories. Those stories are carried 
( if they are carried ) because they have 
high reader or listener interest. 

Now, just as a publication divides 
its activities, so, too, may a commer- 
cial enterprise divide its efforts: Em- 
ploy an advertising agency for paid 
space and a PR firm for editorial ma- 
terial. A sponsor of a radio or TV 
series may wish to advertise in a news- 
paper to attract listeners. Or he may 
employ a PR firm to obtain editorial 
space. Both have their legitimate ends 
and they are independent of each oth- 
er There is nothing "sneaky" about 
using one without the other. Just 
where is the "major clash" Mr. Lan- 
dry is talking about? The radio col- 
umn of the New York Times is open 
to advertisers and non-advertisers on 
an exactly equal footing. The publish- 
ers of that venerable daily have found 
it honorable and profitable to keep it 
that way. They do not appear to be 
worried about their radio editor be- 
becoming dreamy-eyed when he sees a 
PR man. nor that he will sell out for 

a bottle of yogurt. „ „ 

Ld Greif 

Partner 

Banner & Greif 
New York 



TV STUDY AT U. OF MISSOURI 

In a recent issue of SPONSOR, you 
<ariied a fine picture report of the re- 
cent Hofstra study of brand prefer- 
ences among owners and non-owners 
of television sets. I ripped the pages 
from my copy of SPONSOR, and then 
cut out the individual numbered pic- 
tures and cemented them to cards for 
use in a baloptican projector. 

Twelve of the picture panels backed 
up each other on two sides of a single 
page. To take care of them. I cut win- 
dows in the cards and put the panels in 
the windows beneath pieces of clear 
plastic. But in spite of the great piece 
of scotch lape and rubber cement. I 
did a lousy job, and of course the nu- 
merical order of the panels is messed 
up. what with panel 14 being on the 
hack of panel 6 and panel 9 being 
backed up 1>\ panel 18. 




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John H. Phipps, Owner 
| L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr 

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JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 



Southeastern Representative 
HARRY E. CUMM1NGS 

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OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
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NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 

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I showed the display to mv class in 
Radio and Television Advertising yes- 
terday morning and certainly want to 
continue using them. But I had hetter 
improve it. For that purpose, will you 
kindly send me two copies of the issue 
in which the Hofstra report appeared, 
and hill me for same? Or, hetter, could 
you let me know what it would cost 
to get 4x5 glossy prints of the photo- 
graphs from which you made your en- 
gravings? 

Milton E. Gross 

Associate Professor of Journalism 

University of Missouri 

Columbia 



FARM DIRECTORS APPLAUD 

On behalf of America's radio farm 
directors, I want to thank you very 
much for the spread that you gave 
us in the 9 October issue of sponsor. 
And I want to personally thank you for 
carrying the group picture of the A & 
M boys on tour as well as the story on 
our farm program setup at KTRH. 

I might mention that 1 showed the 
copy to the sponsor mentioned in the 
outline. Uncle Johnny Mills, and they 
too were very appreciative. 

We radio farm directors certainly 
have much to be thankful for in hav- 
ing an outstanding trade publication 
such as yours aware of the value of 
farm program sponsorship. 

George Roesner 

KTRH 

Houston 



I would appreciate having a copy in 
my files of the excellent article, "The 
farm director; what a salesman!" 
which appeared in the 9 October issue 
of sponsor. This is the finest article 
of its kind I have ever read and will 
be most helpful to me. 

Alvin D. Bauer 

Farm Service Director 

KPOJ 

Portland 



APPLAUSE FOR LANDRY 

I do not think there is any question 
in your mind that I am a terrific boost- 
er of your magazine. I think you have 
increased your readability by printing 
in every issue an article by Bob Lan- 
dry. Although I don't know Bob per- 




NEW ORLEANS' 

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NEGRO MARKET? 



Reach more than Vi million Colored 
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1 JANUARY 1951 



61 



Mr. Justin Miller, Pres. 

National Association of Broadcasters 

Washington, D. C. 

Dear Justin: 
Happy Noo Year ter yuh! 
vuh has 




Hopes 
many- 
em ! 



more i 

This is a mighty 
good time ter 
tell yuh 'bout 
sumpthin' noo 
thet WCHS is 
doin sump- 

thin yuh'll be 
glad ter hear! 
Yessir, Justin, 
WCHS and Mor- 
ris Harvey Col- 
lege here in 
Charleston, West 
Virginny, is of- 
ferin college 
credit courses 
over th' radio! 
Now ain't thet 
s u m pt hin'? I 
heerd 'em talk- 
in th' other day, 
an' b eginni n' 
January 26 folks 
in West Virginny 
kin start goin' ter college by lissenin' 
ter WCHS! Jest tho't y'ud like ter 
hear 'bout sumpthin' noo on Noo 
Years! 

Yrs. 
Algy 

WCHS 
Charleston, W. Va. 



Selling 
Power 



PROVEN BY ARBI 

Zke XL Stations 

of the Pacific Northwest 

• WASHINGTON 

KXLY— Spokane 

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KXLK-Great Falls 
KXLL— Missoula 
KXLQ— Bozeman 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 

347 Madison Avenue 6381 Hollywood Blvd. 
New York 17, N. Y. Hollywood 28, Calif. 



sonally, I have always been a great ad- 
mirer of his, inasmuch as he was at 
Variety when I was a working newspa- 
per man in Shreveport, Atlanta, and 
Little Rock. I was a Variety corre- 
spondent, and it gave me the occasion 
to correspond with him. Believe me, 
those checks sure looked good in those 
days. 

I really think you are doing your- 
self proud having him on your payroll. 
I have missed him for a long time and 
believe there are hundreds in the in- 
dustry that feel the same way. 

Julian F. Haas 

Commercial Manager 

KARK 

Little Rock 



AUTOMOBILES 

{Continued from page 49 1 

by featuring stars like Helen Hayes. 
Judith Anderson and Henry Fonda. 

Hudson I agency : Brooke, Smith, 
French & Dorrance. Detroit ) bought a 
heavy schedule of TV announcements 
in all major markets for its new 1951 
models. Radio announcements were 
used where TV was not available. Hud- 
son's network TV effort, the Billy Rose 
Show over ABC, Tuesdays, 9 p.m. to 
9:30 p.m., is one of the better dra- 
matic productions on the air. Jed Har- 
ris with long Broadway experience di- 
rects. Like everything else that in- 
volves Billy Rose, the figures are high 
for this half-hour program. Without 
including time, the budget has been 
estimated at $25,000 weekly. 

Kaiser-Frazer (Wm. Weintraub, 
New York ) excites mystery fans with 
the Ellery Queen Show, DuMont, 
Thursday 9 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The TV 
program is supplemented by a radio 
announcement schedule. 

Lincoln-Mercury (agency: Kenyon 
& Eckhardt, New York ) has one of the 
lop rated video shows in Ed Sullivan's 
Toast of the Town, Sundays, CBS, 8 
p.m. to 9 p.m. Production and talent 
estimate: $16,000 weekly. This corn- 
pans prepared about 20 different radio 
announcements, mostly musical, to help 
promote the new car. 

Nash ( agency : Geyer, Newell & Gan- 
ger. New York ) introduced its new car 
with announcements over 150 radio 
stations and 56 TV stations. The ma- 
jor effort on the air is the Nash Air- 
jlvte Theater, a dramatic show on CBS, 



Thursdays (10:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. i 
Production and talent costs: $20,700 
weekly. Nash also uses two Charles 
Michelson transcribed radio shows. 
The Sealed Book and the Musical Com- 
edy Theater. 

Oldsmobile (agency: D. P. Brother, 
Detroit ) has an excellent TV property 
at these times in the across-the-board 
CBS news show 7:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. 
Cost of the show is about $8,500. Olds 
will introduce comedian Sam Levenson 
on his first network series Saturday. 




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62 



SPONSOR 






Jan. 27, 7:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., CBS- 
TV. Radio announcements will be car- 
ried over 158 stations for a two-month 
period. 

Plymouth (agency: N. W. Ayer, 
New York) has arranged for one-shot 
deals on Monty Woolley, Fabulous 
Montague, NBC, 9 to 9:30 p.m. and 
Nero Wolfe, NBC, 8 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., 
both for Friday, Jan. 12. 

Pontiac (agency: MacManus, John 
& Adams, Detroit ) hit hard with a sat- 
uration campaign that included radio 
announcements five times daily over 
1,125 stations and TV announcements 
about three times daily on 96 stations. 

These radio and TV announcements 
featured such personalities as Arlene 
Francis, John Daly, John Kennedy, 
and Kyle MacDonnell. 

Packard ( agency 
cam, New York) sponsors Holiday Ho- 
tel over ABC-TV Thursdays 9 p.m. to 
9:30 p.m. at a cost of about $14,000 
weekly for production and talent. For- 
mat is a variety show with a hotel 
background. Young & Rubicam also 
produced about 12 film announcements 
for dealer use. 

Studebaker (agency: Roche, Wil- 
liams & Cleary, Chicago) used 94 sta- 
tions for its radio announcement cam- 
paign to launch the new car. 

There's no doubt that automobiles 
have become a permanent fixture on 



TV screens (though appraisal of this 
year's activity indicates that this me- 
dium will be used as a specialized tool 
for many years to come). When tele- 
vision set owners actually get color 
reception, automobile advertisers ex- 
pect even greater results from the me- 



Young & Rubi- 



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1 JANUARY 1951 



dium. Complicated machinery can be 
shown in depth with different colored 
parts. What is probably most impor- 
tant for the women, who help make the 
decisions on car buying, is that style 
and appearance will be shown to the 
fullest advantage. * * * 



TOOLS 



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Here are informational tools that sponsor feels can be of use to you. 
Requests for material must be made within 30 days. 



A 128 "A Golden Egg," WTRF, Bel- 
laire, Ohio — brings together 19 letters 
from distributors, sponsors, retailers, 
and listeners pointing out the effective 
results of WTRF-FM. The brochure 
gives additional facts on station cover- 
age and FM sets in the market area. 

A129 "Complaint," RCA, New York 
— is a copy of the temporary injunc- 
tion filed by RCA to restrain the FCC 
from immediately enforcing its order 
for adoption of color TV standards. 

A130 "There's Dollars in WERD- 
ville," WERD, Atlanta — is a pioneer 
study of the only Negro-owned radio 
station in the United States. The book- 
let gives population distribution, in- 
come levels, and random facts on the 
vast Negro population which lives in 
the listening area of WERD. 

A131 "A Market Study of Burnaby 
Municipality," CKNW, New West- 
minster, B. C. — shows the results of an 
up-to-the-minute survey of the Burnaby 
Municipality. Survey reports listening 
habits of market area. 

AT 32 "A Market Study of Greater 
New Westminster," CKNW, New 
Westminster, B. C. — illustrates the early 
morning and late evening listening hab- 
its of the population of Greater New 
Westminster. CKNW is station favored. 

A133 "Data Sheets on TV Sta- 
tions," Petry & Co., Inc., New York — 
presents standard, individualized in- 
formation on 12 Petry TV stations. 
Each report contains information on 
the market, programing, operating 
schedule, personnel, coverage, etc. 



A134 "Advertising Problems Dur- 
ing Shortages,'' Schuyler Hopper Co., 
New York — is devoted to ad problems 
that confronted management in the 
economy of 1941-1945. Advertising's role 
in a seller's market is stressed. 

A135 "Tele-Census," Woodbury 
College, Los Angeles — indicates cartoon 
advertising is preferred by TV viewers 
on West Coast. From 42% to 44% of 
3,000 set owners checked made pur- 
chases as direct result of TV commer- 
cials. From 26% to 36% believed 
color was one to two years off. 

A136 "What Every Advertiser 
Should Know When He Buys Radio 
Time in the Triple Cities Trading 
Area Which Includes Binghamlon, 
Johnson City, and Endicott," WNBF, 
Binghamton, N. Y. — presents audience 
data on retail markets and coverage of 
WNBF, WKOP, WINR, and WENE. 

A137 "The Big Plus In Little 
Rock," KARK, Little Rock— is a re- 
port on coverage, audience ratings of 
this station, average county penetra- 
tion, cost per thousand families and 
impact on principal shopping radius. 

A138 "KTTV Channel 1 1," KTTY. 
Los Angeles — pictorial record of first 
year's operation of this Los Angeles 
Times-CBS station. 

AT 39 "A New Approach to the 
Buying of Radio Time," WOV, New 

York — is a description of the station's 
three evening programs sold to par- 
ticipants at a single rate. 



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63 




Rtttlio: gtiessivorh medium 

Contrary to the present belief of 
many broadcasters, national advertis- 
ers and their advertising agencies are 
not out to underrate or downgrade ra- 
dio. 

What many radio station operators, 
and some network executives, don't un- 
derstand is that the national advertis- 
er, by and large, expects no more or 
no less from radio than from any com- 
petitive medium. 

True, the advertiser wants to get the 
most for his advertising dollar. And 
over the past 14 years, according to a 
recent Printers' Ink study, radio has 
been tops with the firms that spend 
most. National advertisers are not out 
to scuttle radio. Why should they, 
when the P&G's. General Foods'. Lever 
Brothers' only stand to gain by help- 
ing keep the medium that means most 
to them prosperous. 

In today's atmosphere the NBC 
nighttime rate reduction decision 
(which seemed destined for defeat as 
this issue went to press) is hard for the 
stations to fathom. While most criti- 
cism is heaped on NBC, not a few sta- 
tions point to the so-called "buyers' 
strike" as the thing that brought it 
about. 

But the real cause still goes unno- 

Ih id. 

\(l\cili>ci> want to pa\ foi what 
they get. In the case of radio they 
don't know what they ^<-t. 

Advertisers like to he sold. Radio 
as a medium does minimum selling. 

Actually, advertisers don'l honestly 
know whether radio is overpriced or 
underpriced. They've been led to be- 
lieve by the advent of television and 
the constanl sniping of competitive me- 



that 



dittime radio is on a tobog- 



gan. But do the} know? How can the^ 



know? The networks themselves don't 
know. 

I he number one cause of radio s 
temporary loss of prestige is too much 
research — yet not enough. As one far- 
sighted network executive put it. "Why 
blame the sponsor. We're drowning 
him with Hoopers. Nielsens, Pulses, 
Conlans. and what have you. The sta- 
tion uses the rating that best serves 
his specific purpose. And the ratings 
by different services in the same city 
are often poles apart." 

What there isn't enough of is defi- 
nitive research that accurately mea- 
sures how much listening goes on in- 
side an average American home. The 
day of personal-set and individual- 
loom listening tin TV homes and non- 
TV homes) has arrived. Yet who mea- 
sures bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, 
porch, den listening adequately? 

Not Hooper. Not Nielsen. Not even 
Pulse with its personal interview sys- 
tem. 

Today nobody knows the true di- 
mensions of radio. Radox (the Phila- 
delphia electronic system ) could have 
measured it. But Radox died some 
months ago. 

If nobody knows the true dimensions 
of radio ( out-of-home listening is still 
in its early stages of Pulse analysis 
and in-home listening hasn't even be- 
gun to be adequately measured) who 
is to blame? 

The responsibility for measurement 
of a medium rests with the medium it- 
self. Why blame the advertiser if he 
thinks radio should be downgraded? 
Nobody has convinced him differently. 

Radio has been almost as remiss on 
the promotional front. Mitch's Pitch 
was magnificent, but he couldn't do 
everything with limited funds and lim- 
ited months. His major sales effort 
was on the local radio level. Since TV's 
advent the innuendo strategy of the 
black-and-white media has paid big 
dividends — at radios expense. And ii 
the networks and NAB have countered 
this petty sniping in telling fashion 
we've missed noticing it. 

We understand that the NAB's alert 
Bill Ryan is checking research means 
of proving radio's full worth. We 
know that the million dollar BAB has 
the strong endorsement of NAB mem- 
bers. These point the right way. 

We think thai NBC's rate reduction 
surest ions will die when the affiliates 
meet in New York 10 January. But 
unless radio learns to (1) correcth 
count its audiciuc (2) positively de- 



fend itself, we believe it's in for un- 
happy days. 

We recommend that the wheels gain 
momentum fast. Maybe the advertiser 
deserves a rate decrease. Then he 
should get it. Maybe he should pay 
more. He'll be glad to pay it. 

Right now he doesn't know. 

Research experts like Alfred Politz 
have the confidence of major advertis- 
ers and are well versed in accurately 
measuring media. The networks joint- 
ly or separately, the NAB, should con- 
tact such people and quickly make 
plans for a measurement of radio. 

Radox. though defunct, is still a su- 



Radio's problem 

Do advertisers really know 
what radio is worth? 

How can they, when broadcast- 
ers themselves don't know the 
true dimensions of the medium? 

The responsibility for measur- 
ing a medium to the satisfaction 
of the man who foots the bills 
rests with the medium itself. 

Maybe radio rates are too high. 
Maybe they're too low. Personal- 
ly, we're convinced it's the latter 
but we'd still like to see the proof. 

SPONSOR contends that it be- 
hooves broadcasters, who have 
seen radio lose prestige with ad- 
vertisers, to measure the medium 
and present facts that any adver- 
tisers can readily understand and 
appreciate. 

We contend that radio as a me- 
dium must be sold to national ad- 
vertisers. 



perb and relatively low-cost tool for 
measuring all listening within a home. 
The networks jointly can finance a re- 
sumption of Radox in Philadelphia and 
possible expansion to New York and 
Chicago. Together with a suitable 
group of agency-advertiser observers, 
network research heads can use such a 
system to good advantage in measur- 
ing radio. 

The NAB should immediately inau- 
gurate a publicity campaign to boost 
radio's prestige. NAB has a top indus- 
tr\ relations specialist in Boh Richards. 
We sa\. give him the job. The net- 
works and stations will pitch in. 

Why, we ask, continue radio as the 
guesswork medium? Advertisers don't 
relish it. Broadcasters lose by it. 



64 



SPONSOR 



w, 



AT WORK 
KEEPING 

Freedom 
on the 
Air 



ith each new year, in fact 
with each new dav, radio 
faces ever greater responsi- 
bilities. As the articulate 
voice of the nation it must, 
and will, send to the ends of 
the earth the message of hope 
and freedom which America 
alone holds out to the rest 
of the troubled world. It is 
with these thoughts in mind 
that WJR pledges the re- 
sources of its men, its women 
and its broadcasting equip- 
ment to the task of making 
the message of America 
audible the world over! 




THE GOODWILL STATION, Inc. 

FISHER BLDG., DETROIT 

CBS 

50,000 

WATTS 



Call or write your 
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FREE SPEECH 



For three straight months 

WWDC 

Washington, had the 

BIGGEST 
MONTH 

in its history! 






October was the biggest month in WWDC's exciting history! Then 
November topped October! And then December topped November! 
This happened in Washington, mind you— a booming city with 4 
newspapers, 4 television stations, and 14 radio stations. There's just 
one reason why: WWDC gives advertisers more results in dollars 
and cents. Get all the dope from your Forjoe man. 



P. S.— Transit Radio (WWDC-FM) also broke all records for the 
3-month period. Don't overlook this hot new advertising medium 
in your 1951 plans. National reps: H-R Representatives, Inc. 



15 JANUARY 1951 



50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year ^ 



The Alka-Seltzer story: 
19 years of air success— p. 25 






the story of 

WLS and the 



1,235,734 BOS TOPS 

Back in 1936, Little Crow Milling Company called on WLS to perform what seemed to be a most 

difficult task. They wanted to introduce a jjew kind of cereal, Coco-Wheats, 
to Midwest homes. What made the task seem so difficult was: \ 

1. Not a single salesman was to be used! 

2. Not a single package of Coco-Wheats was in the area. 

_ \ 4 

3* Not a single buyer in the area had been called on. 

Some said it couldn't be done ... it was expecting too mulh s i|f even the recognized great power of 
radio and WLS. But it worked. Radio's ever magic touch created idesire, and turned that desire into action 
WLS listeners were sold Coco-Wheats . . . demanded it of their merchants . . . Wet seiat box tops to the station. 
Through 1950, WLS has received 1,23,5,734 box tops for this one account! Today, Codo-Wheats 

is well known and solidly entrenched throughout the Middlewest. WLS listener-response then 
and each and every year since is proof that WLS advertising produces volume sales. \ 
This is but one example of the continuing effectiveness of WLS in building product 
acceptance ... an effectiveness predicated on knowledge of and adherence 
to listeners' interest in their day to day business and home life in city or on farm. 
That builds listener loyalty — and listener loyalty is the substance 

of successful radio advertising. 
For detailed information on how radio's ever magic touch can sell for 
you, contact your John Blair man, or write WLS today. 



CLEAR CHANNEL Home of the NATIONAL Bam Dance 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR \ AND COMPANY 





BILL RYAN SELECTION FOR BAB PRESIDENCY WELCOMED— Practical broadcaster and 
able administrator William B. Ryan's appointment as head of proposed million- 
dollar Broadcast Advertising Bureau came as surprise to most of trade. Shift from 
general managership of NAB hadn't been expected; but now consensus is that Ryan's 
high standards, administrative skill, and radio knowhow make him ideal choice to 
head unit that will tell man that foots the bill what he needs to know about 
medium. If reorganized BAB reaches scope of ANPA Bureau of Advertising, some 100 
people will be on job. 

RADIO'S BAD YEAR 5.4% TO GOOD — Year-end 1950 radio estimates by NAB's statis- 
tician Dr. Ken Baker show medium ahead of preceding year by 5.4%. Only networks, 
with 3.3% decline, suffered. National spot showed thumping 11.4% increase; re- 
gional networks 8.4% increase; local retail 7.8% increase. Indications are that 
spot will soar in 1951. 

DO TV SIGNALS TRAVEL FARTHER IN CALIFORNIA? — KTTV , Los Angeles, reports that 
station's programs are published by The Fresno Bee (216 air miles from LA), The 
Bakersfield Calif ornian (119 air miles from LA), San Diego Evening Tribune (112 
air miles from LA), Santa-Barbara News-Press (92 air miles from LA). Conclusion 
is that newspapers have plenty of evidence that station signal is received in their 
areas — that dimensions of good TV coverage are often more than 40 to 50 mile 
radius generally credited. 
B£I 

WHAT ADVERTISERS WANT FROM RADIO — That comprehensive Free & Peters survey on 
radio news, just out, was made mainly to give Esso facts about its 5-minute news- 
casts. Esso had dropped some shows in TV markets last spring when F & P took bull 
by horns and hired Pulse to do thorough-going study in 7 markets. Results show 
radio preferred over all other media for news, radio outranking newspapers by 
38%, TV by 268%. Esso agency, Marschalk & Pratt, worked with F & P on study, is 
pleased with new facts uncovered. Said an agency spokesman: "This is kind of 
thing radio should do much more often." 

ZIV SPENDING $12,000 PER SHOW FOR NEW BOCART-BACALL SERIES — Tipoff that spot 
radio business is expected to continue at present up-spiralling rate is Fredric 
W. Ziv decision to launch new adventure series, with Humphrey Bogart, Lauren 
Bacall co-starred. Otherwise, Ziv wouldn't put $12,000 in production costs into 
each half hour show. Bogarts get minimum fee, plus royalty, are expected to 
realize $5,000 weekly during first year. Budget for script is set at $1,000 per 
program, high for an adventure series. 



SPONSOR, Volume 5. No. 2, 15 January 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January" 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



*m -■: 



REPORT TO SPONSOR for 15 January 1951 

'/ DREAMT I WENT SHOPPING IN MY MAIDEN FORM BRA' DUE ON TV — That arresting 
series of Maiden Form magazine ads is due for conversion into TV commercials with 
live models. William Weintraub, Maiden Form agency, has the tough job of recre- 
ating delicate fantasy of printed ads on TV. Maiden Form models will do their 
dreaming on "Faith Baldwin Show" (Saturday, 11-11:30 a.m.), which firm will bank- 
roll every other week on approximately 50 ABC-TV stations ; alternate week is 
optioned to another Weintraub client. Exquisite Form, which was first to use live 
bra models (SPONSOR, 4 December), recently dropped its show ("Robbins' Nest," 
ABC-TV). 

SHADES OF 1890 — Said public relations chief of top national food firm to a SPONSOR 
researcher: "Huh, advertising. It's just puffery." The punch line: his is firm 
built by advertising (and heavy on air). Don't the Ad boys talk to the public 
relations department? 

CARLING'S RED CAP ALE MAKES FIRST NET BUY — Merchandising possibilities of net 

sports show attracted Carling's Red Cap Ale when it bought 15-minute Mutual 
sportscast from Hialeah and Gulf Stream parks, starting 20 January for 13 weeks. 
Racing stanza will be carried on 250 to 300 stations tailored to Carling's dis- 
tribution pattern. In studying move, Benton & Bowles execs discovered horse rac- 
ing drew more attendance last year than major league baseball. 

TV HELP-WANTED ADS OUT-PULL NEW S PAPERS IN CLEVE L AND — In highly industri- 
alized Cleveland, manpower squeeze has already set in. Traditional want ads in 
newspapers have failed to pull inquiries from specialized technicians. But 3 in- 
dustrial firms now seeking help via WXEL programs are pulling inquiries by dozens. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tube, Cadillac Tank Plant, National Screw use 15-minute 
shows (news, sports) with help-wanted notices as commercials. 

CROSBY FILMS SIGN WITH NEW DISTRIBUTION CROUP — United Television Programs 
has signed exclusive distribution contract with Bing Crosby TV films. United was 
formed recently by Edward Petry, Standard Radio Transcriptions, and Century 
Artists to provide nationwide TV film distribution. Firm's aim is to stabilize 
distribution. The Crosby TV film properties include "Fireside Theatre," now 
sponsored by Procter & Gamble (NBC-TV). "Fireside" is available to advertisers 
for first showings in some markets, second showings in others, including New York. 
United provides for TV national spot program facilities missing for radio. 

DR. DUMONT LAUDED FOR ROLE IN EXCESS-PROFITS LEGISLATION — Nevi York Scripps- 
Howard outlet, World-Telegram and Sun, praised Dr. Allen B. DuMont for his role 
in getting better break for "growth" companies in excess profits law passed by 
81st Congress. Dr. DuMont headed National Conference of Growth Companies, sub- 
mitted proposals to law makers in legislative form, at their request. 

TREND TO NEWS SPONSORSHIP CONTINUES — Two widely different stories in this issue 
of SPONSOR uncovered evidence of continuing trend to radio news sponsorship. 
"Bar candy on the air," (page 38) underlines trend with account of Peter Paul's 
expanded spot news schedule. "Radio's return to normalcy" (page 34) tells how 
Bab-0 has dropped two dramatic shows to go into a TV series and AM news. 



SPONSOR 



Gimme a dozen of 

the black orchids. 1 



// 




Jr lowers, frozen foods or furniture, our 
Red River Valley farmers ean afford to buy 
anything they want, beeause their Effective 
Buying Income is far above the national 
average ! 

WDAY, Fargo, is 'way above the national 
average as a radio buy, too. Fargo-Moorhead 
Hoopers show that for Total Rated Periods 
(Dec. '49-Apr. '50) WDAY got a 63.5% Share 



of Audience, as against only 16.0% for Sta- 
tion B! A 1950 survey by students at North 
Dakota Agricultural College proves that 
WDAY is the 17-to-l favorite among rural 
families in tbe 22-county area studied — the 
3-to-l favorite over all otber stations com- 
bined! 

Let us or Free & Peters give you all the dope. 
It's reallv something! 





FARGO, N. D. 

NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



15 JANUARY 1951 



/Tl\ 



ii w 





DIGEST FOR 15 JANUARY 1951 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER 2 



ARTICLES 



The AlkaSeltzer story 

In darkest depression days, Miles Laboratories turned to radio with rural- 
type thov/s. Now they're among top 10 national sponsors 



McCann-Eriekson starts ivith research 

Agency has team of top names in research to guide its efforts. A close- 
up of the way the research department works, the people, their tools 



I in* «ir teams frotn Toni 

Hair coloring product is sweeping nation, changing women's prejudices 
against home dyeing. Radio/TV shows are spearhead 



Spot programing report: Music libraries 

A long roster of local sponsors use music library programs; but national 
and regional advertisers neglect them despite many advantages 



They" re coming bach to nulio 

Sponsors are assuming a more realistic attitude toward radio and TV as 
teamwork media. War is one important factor in attitude change 



Canity on the air 

Materials cost increases are squeezing confectionery manufacturers, but 
advertising continues at a fast pace and radio/TV use spirals 



COMING 



Ihiytime television 

To cover what may be I95l's most important TV trend, SPONSOR is 
readying a complete report on the status and outlook for daytime TV 



News on radio 

What are the best times? What variations on the standard news program 
are possible? In this roundup, SPONSOR will include tips to advertisers 
contemplating use of news shows 



Hearing aids on the air 

Beltone, other hearing aid manufacturers, are turning to radio. Their 
strategy and programing approach will be featured 



25 



28 



30 



32 



34 



38 



2» Jan. 



2» Jan. 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: GERALD LIGHT 

P. S. 

QUERIES 

RADIO RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUNDUP 

TOOLS (BROCHURES) AVAILABLE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



6 
11 
18 
21 
22 
40 
42 
44 
71 
72 




COVER: From 1933-1946 WLS "National 
Barn Dance'' was mainstay of Miles Labora- 
tories air ventures. Emphasis now switched to 
broader audience base (see story, page 25). 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editor: Erik H. Arctander 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Kay Brown (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast 
Manager), George Weiss (Southern Rep- 
resentative), John A. Kovchok (Production 
Manager), Edna Yergin, Douglas Graham 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villa n+i 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Pulished biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circulation and 
Advertising Offices 510 Madison Ave. Now fork 22. 
\ \ Telephone: MUrraj Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
360 V Michigan Avenue Telephone Financial 0-1556. 
West Coasl Office 6087 Sunsel Boulevard, Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311 Printing Offlse: :mo Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions United States 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $'.». Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
\i:i. linn Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 






IT'S EASY, 



WHEN YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



SHREVEPORT SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
Weekday Afternoons Dec. '49 — Apr. '50 



KWKH is the outstanding radio buy in the rich tri-state 
market around Shreveport. Hoopers and BMB figures 
prove it. 

The pie chart above shows KWKH's Hooper Weekday 
Afternoon superiority in Shreveport. KWKH's Share 
of Audience is 36.2% greater than the next station. On 
Weekday Mornings it's 101.8% greater — on Weekday 
Evenings, 81.5% greater! 

But KWKH with 50,000 watts goes on and on and on, 
beyond Shreveport. KWKH pulls a Daytime BMB 
audience of 303,230 families in 87 Louisiana, Arkansas 
and Texas counties. 227,701 of these families are "aver- 
age daily listeners." 

Yes, KWKH's Know-How really pays off. Let us send 
you all the proof. 




KWKH DAYTIME 
BMB COUNTIES 
Study No. 2 — Spring, 1949 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts • CBS ■ 



Texas 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company AricAfl^J^S 

Representatives 

Henry Clay, General Manager 



OUH BOYS 

TDPS 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES! 




"KING OF THE DISC JOCKEYS" 

George Sanders, receives "Movie Stars 
Parade" award from lovely Kathryn 
Grayson on set of MGM's "Grounds 
for Marriage." 

NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARD 

MAKES SANDERS 1951 CHAMP 

AMONG COMPETING 1500 

Polling over 25,000 votes, George 
Sanders wins silver trophy, cash and 
the privilege of presenting a $300 tele- 
vision set to the veteran's hospital of 
his choice. KFVD feels the contest 
proves a striking demonstration of 
extensive, listenable night-time cov- 
erage, as well as a beautiful tribute 
to the 

INTENSE LOYALTY 

OF 

LISTENERS 

TO 

"SPADE COOLEYTIME" 

AND 

"DREAMTIME" 

ON 

1020 kc 




LOS ANGELES 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Recently in his Los Angeles retirement, Joseph N. Weber passed 
on, aged 84. Obituaries reminded admen, if they slowed down long 
enough to read them, that Weber had been co-founder, in 1896. with 
one Owen Miller of the American Federation of Musicians. Weber 
was president for 40 years, or until 1940 when he was succeeded by 
the more famous and colorful James C. Petrillo. Thus two men only 
have dominated the union for a full half century. 

As often happens when a man dies 10 years or longer after he has 
ceased directly to influence events, the bare story gave little hint of 
the power Weber once exercised, or of his problems, or his philos- 
ophy. A mellow elder statesman in his later days compared with 
rough-tough Petrillo from rough-tough Chicago, Weber had a single- 
track interest in one thing: jobs for musicians. He fought the con- 
stricting noose of technological unemployment. And just here, in 
the history of the AFM, the sponsor of today gets some clue, realis- 
tically, to the attitude of the television unions. 



Of course, it is no responsibility of advertisers that musicians find 
fewer jobs and that some of them are, in sober truth and no gag, 
barbers on the side. But it's not to be expected that the union will 
be equally casual. Again and again in his time, Weber faced the 
challenge of some new "mechanization'' of entertainment. He seldom 
liked what he saw. There was, of course, no staying the march of 
invention. First came the gramophone. Then the movies. Then the 
radio. Then the improved electrical phonograph. Then the talkies 
with a sound track that provided its own musical accompaniment. 
All this in less than half a century. And at the climax, TV. 

But greater than any of the inventions, or all of them, was the 
phenomenon of advertising sponsorship. Here for the first time gags 
and skits, hoofing and slight-of-hand existed not for entertainment's 
sake alone, but merchanrlising's. 



Weber didn't like these changes and probably nobody of his gen- 
eration and attitude could really like a show business harnessed to 
packaged desserts, patented hair-goo or demulcent, slow-burning 
cigarettes for the T-zone. Neither Weber, nor anybody else, foresaw 
in the horse-drawn medicine show caravans of 1900 the future union 
of music and remedies, nor anticipated the crazy days a quarter 
century later when radio should be known among the wags as "the 
medicine show with chimes." 

The old show business travelled. That was a chief characteristic. 
Stars and their companies came by train. Tent shows were trucked 
in. Show boats came paddling down the inland streams. It was a 
scattered and intensely private kind of private enterprise with a high 
mortality rate. Strandings were common, ethics unusual, uncertainty 
and gamble universal. But virile it was, and more loved than today's 
show business of fixed address. 



Please turn to page 46 I 



SPONSOR 




America Looks to KCMO 
for On-the-Spot Farm Market Reports 




OtieVoesfc 

• ONE Station 

• ONE Rate Card 

• ONE Spot on the dial 

• ONE Set of call letters 



AZW 



Gospel in the rich Mid-America farm area are the daily broadcasts, direct 

from the Kansas City Livestock Exchange, by Bruce Davies, KCMO's 

ace Farm Market Reporter, and Associate Agriculture Director. 

Monday through Saturday, Bruce Davies is on the air . . . with his 

Market Summary at 6:45 AM, Livestock Markets at 12:40 PM, and Grain 

and Produce Markets at 12:50 PM. These market reports plus farm news 

and analysis by Jack Jackson, KCMO's Agriculture Director, make 

the first radio farm service in Mid-America. 

Active in the Future Farmers of America and the 4-H, Bruce Davies 

judges many livestock contests and speaks the language of the farmer as he 

daily works with them from his vantage point in the stockyards. 

Bruce Davies' reports are now available. Ask the Katz man 
for details or call, write or wire KCMO. 



50,000 WATTS Daytime 
810 KC. 10,000 WATTS Night 



KANSAS CITY 6, MISSOURI 



National Representative: 
The Katz Agency 



15 JANUARY 1951 






LAUREN 



\ ti nm IkM-fflU klfrkm adwdm 



•■eoGitGersMWif 



-"BABY 



6eT sTHB SPONSORS 



<■ cvplOSWE as ll "~ 
STAR CAST AS EXPL ^ fQR 



EA CH PROGRAM 

SW |NGS" f AME 



WITH AN ALL J»-_- - ROSE Of 






/Barir 



flHw 



..quick 



■Mtt.. 









— w< ' 



tf&VtHTURt 




KGW THE ONLY STATION 
WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



in the ORtGO< 



£Hi3Si 




More than a century of development and growth has brought 
Forest Grove to a leading place in Oregon's economic and cultural 
scheme. Abundant natural resources, stable business and agricul- 
tural activity offer a rich market completely within the Compre- 
hensive Coverage of KGW. A recent Tour-Test, sponsored by 
KGW with the cooperation of the Oregon State Motor Associa- 
tion, proves the dominance of KGW in this market. The test was 
witnessed by Walter C. Giersbach, president of Forest Grove's 
Pacific University. He is pictured in front of the original campus 
building, a 100-year-old structure built of enduring western wood, 
the oldest building west of the Mississippi to remain in continuous 
use for educational purposes. Forest Grove, wealthy in economy 
and tradition, is yours through Comprehensive Coverage of KGW. 





BROADCAST MEASUREMENT 
BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSHIP 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's efficient 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area and 
reaches more radio families than any other Portland 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys bear 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the population 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and South- 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
(From 1949 BMB Survey) 




DAYTIME 
KGW 

Station B 
Station C 
Station D 

NIGHTTIME 
KGW 

Station B 
Station C 
Station D 



350,030 
337,330 
295,470 
192,630 



367,370 
350,820 
307,970 
205,440 



chart, complied from om- 
half-mihvolt contour maps 
i with the FCC in Washing 
. DC, or from field intensity 
Yeys. tells the story of KGW's 
MPREHENS1VE COVER- 
Eof the fastest-growing mar- 



■ PORTLAND, OREGON 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



10 



SPONSOR 






,HifI.;tU.'3«<at,!,4KrtHiH 



Neir and renew 




15 JANUARY 1951 




1. .Veic on Itailht Networks 







Numbers after names 
refer to category of 
listing on this page 

Richard Diamond ( I ) 
Mr. Blandings ( I ) 
Ma Perkins (2) 

C. Collingwood (2) 
Halls of Ivy (2) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



It. T. K.iI.Imm 



W >ll i.ii.i \\ einlrauh 



Bymarl In. 


Cecil & Presbrey 


CBS 


1 IT 


It, Mill Drag Co 


BBDO 


CBS 


18(1 


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

Co 


William K.ty 


AI1C 




Sonolone Corp 


Lloyd, Chester & Dil- 
lingham 


(Its 


73 


Trans World Airline 


BBDO 


NBC 


61 


V. S. Arm} Recruiting 


Grunt 


Mils 


150 



News; IM-F l":2.-,. 11:25, 12:25, -*:25. 3:25, 
1 27, (S-min, <> times dailj > : 15 Jan: 52 wks 
Unnamed; Sat ll:30-noon; 211 Ian: 52 wks 

\ni.i- 'ri \iifl, : Sun 7 :.'!<!. H pm; 7 Jan; 52 wk- 

Richard Diamond, Private Detective; F 8-8 .m 

pm; ."» Jan; 32 wk» 
Galen Drake; Sal 2:3<)-t.-> pm; 6 Jan; 16 wks 

Mr. Blandings; Sun 5:30-6 pm: 21 Jan; 39 trlca 
II.. Shadow; Sin 5-5:30 pm; 7 Jan 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start duration 



Cainpana Sale- Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Pcet Co 
Colgate-Palmolivc-Peel Co 
Ferry-Morse Seed Co 

Metropolitan Life Insur- 
ance Co 
Procter & Camble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Quaker Oats Co 

Quaker Oats Co 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

Co 
Richfield Oil Corp .,1 N.Y. 

Iti. Mi. I.I Oil Corp of N.Y. 

Schlitz Brewiiu; Co 
Sun Oil Co 



Wallacc-Fcrry-Hanly CBS 181 

Ted Bates NBC 75 

Ted Bates >B< 113 

MacManus, John K CBS 18.1 

Adams 

Young e. Rubicam CBS 26 

Benton & Bowie* CBS 143 

Compton CBS 14" 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- CBS 148 

Sample 

I ompton CBS 131 

Compton CBS 149 

Compton CBS Ml" 

TNeedbatu, Louis & CBS 37 

Brorbv 

Needham. Louis ci CBS IK 

Brorby 

William Esty NBC 161 

Horey, Humra & John- CBS 34 

stone 

Morey, Humm & John- CBS 34 

stone 

Young * Rubicam NBC 170 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson NBC 34 

& Mather 



Bill Shadcl and the News; Sat 11-11:05 am; 27 

Jan; 52 wks 
Sports Newsreel; I 10:30-45 pm; 5 Jan; 52 wks 
Dennis Day: Sat 9:30-10 pm ; 6 Jan; 52 wks 
Garden Gate: Sal 9:45-10 pm ; 17 Feb; 14 wks 

Allan Jackson and the News; M-F 6-6:15 pni; 

1 Jan; 52 wks 
Rosemary; M-F ll:45-noon; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Big Sister; M-F 1-1:15 pin; 1 Jan; 52 wk* 
Ma Perkins; M-F 1:15-30 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 

Young Honor Malone; M-F 1:30-45 pm; 1 Jan; 

52 wk- 
Guiding I.rght: M-F 1:45-2 pm ; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Brighter Day; M-F 2:45-3 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Grady Cole and the Johnson Family; M, W, F 

2-2:15 pm; 15 Jan; 52 wkt 
Lou Childrcth; T, Th 2-2:15 pm ; 15 Jan: 52 

wks 
Grand Ole Oprj : Sal 111:30-11 pm; 6 Jan; 52 

wks 
Larry Lcsiicur; 6:45-7 pm : 6 Jan: 52 wks 

Charles Collingwood: Sun 12:15-1 pm ; 7 Jan; 

52 wks 
Halls of Ivy; W 8-8:30 pm ; 3 Jan; 26 wk~ 
Sunoco Three Star Extra; M-F 6:15-7 pm; 15 

Jan: 52 wk. 



:i. Sen- National Spot Radio Rusiness 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Bo rg- Warner Corp 

Cerher Produt'ls Co 
Griffin Mfg Co 

Lever Brothers Co 
Lewis Food Co 

Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Co 

Standard Oil of In- 
diana 

Sterling Dn.g Inc 



Bahy foods 
Shoe polish 



Dr. Ross dog. <at 

foods 
Life insurance 



Red Crown gas 

line 
Bayer aspirin 



J. Walter Thompson 

(Chi.) 
Federal (N.Y.) 
hVrmingham Castle- 

nian & Pierce 

(N.Y.) 
RuthrauiT A Rvan 

N.Y.) 
Rocket t-Laurilzcn 

<L. A.) 

Young *K- R 11 hi cam 

I N.Y.) 
McCann-Ericksnn 

(Chi.) 
Dancer-Fit zgerald- 

Sample (N.Y.) 



WIRE, Indianapolis 
Southern mkt« 



50 mkt- 

45 Don Li 

6 CBS Par stas 



stns 



12 stns; Detroit. Mil- 
waukee 
1 1 major ink i - 



Anncmis. partie; 15 Jan: 21 

wkfl 

Anne mts ; 15 Jan; 13 wks 

Anncmts; 2*> Jan 



Anncmts; 29 Jan; 7 wks 

.'10. in in trails*- shovt . 1 Jan; 
52 wks 

1 V mi 1 1. news ; 1 Jan ; 52 * ks 

\ mi. nit-. Jan (entire month) 

1-niin annenits; 1 5 Jan ; 5(> 

wks 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot) ; 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



4. National ttroadcast Sales Executives 



New and renew 15 January 1951 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John 1). Allison 

Spencer Benllev 
John D'Aiutolo 
L. Arthur Dawson 
4..i.r-«- Dietrich 
Clifford H. Click 
Joseph Coodfellow 
Thomas Y. Gorman 
Howard L. Gossage 
Alfred IV, Greenberg 
George J. Higgins 
Ed Ilochhauser Jr 
Harold P. Kane 
Ralph E. MeRinnie 
Charles Prall 
Arthur C. Schofield 



Taylor-Howc-Snowden Radio Sales, N.Y'., 

Harry S. Goodman. N.Y., sis exec 

ABC, N.Y., network sis 

E. J. Rinaud Co. N.Y. 

Radiotime Inr, Chi., gen mgr 

WNKW. N.Y.. sis 

WNBC, N.Y., acct exec 

Video. Malic Co, N.Y. 

Richard Me'.tzcr, S.F., acct exec 

WOV, N.Y. 

WISH. Indianapolis, mgr 

Transcription Sales, N.Y.. vp 

WJTN, Jamestown, exec 

Paul II. Raymcr Co, N.Y., acct exec 

WAAF. Chi., sis prom dir 

DuMont, N.Y., dir adv. sis prom 



Paul H. Raymcr Co. N.Y'., acct exec 

WHAN, Charleston, gen mgr 

WCBS, N.Y., acct exec 

WOR, N.Y'., acct exec 

NEC Spot Sales, N.Y., acct exec 

WEAT, Lake Worth, Fla., sis mgr 

NBC Spot Sales, N.Y'., acot exec 

WOR, N.Y'., acct exec 

KCBS, S.F., sis prom mgr 

WSCN. Birm.. sis prom dir 

KMBC-KFRM, K. C, Mo., sis vp 

Associated Program Service, N.Y'., acct exec 

WJOC, Jamestown, sis vp 

Same, sis mgr charge of N.Y. office 

WOR-TV, N.Y.. acct exec 

Paul H. Raymcr Co. N.Y., head sis research, pi 




5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 




Howard M. Chapin 
Ralph J. Cordiner 
W. E. Henges 
Robert J. Keith 
Henry A. Linet 

Howard M. List 
Jos.ph P. McKeown 
Abe Rosenfield 
Robert K. Roulston 



General Foods Corp, N.Y., corp adv dir 
General Electric Co, Schen., exec vp 
Graybar Electric Co, N.Y., asst to prcs 
Pillsbury Mills Inc. Mnpls., adv, pub rel dir 
Universal -International Pictures. N.Y., east- 
ern adv mgr 
Kellogg Co, Battle Creek, asst adv mgr 
Kroner Co, Cincinnati, sis prom asst 
Sive & Rosenfield, Cincinnati, partner 
B. F. Stnrtevant Co. N.Y., exec 



Same, marketing mgr ( Birds Eye div ) 
Same, prcs 

Same, vp 
Same, vp 
Same, sis prom mgr 

Same, adv mgr 

Gruen Watch Co, Cincinnati, retail-prom ass 
Welch Grape Juice Co, Westfield. N.Y.. adv 
Air King Products Co. Hklyn., asst to pres 



6*. IMetv Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Aerated Products Co, L. A. 
All American Airways Ine, Wash. 
Ansonia !>«■ Luxe Shops Inc, N.Y. 
Ardmore Products Co, Ardmore, Pa. 
Borck «K Stevens, Bridgeport 

Bullock's Downtown. L. A. 

Curlington Brewing Co. Burling; ton. Wis. 

Colonial Airlines Inc, N.Y. 

E. J. Cossman & Co. Pittsb. 

Fisher Nut A Chocolate Co. St. Paul 

Gladding. McBean & Co. L. A. 

S. X. Graham Co. Chi. 

Hale Brothers. S.F. 

Hudson Products Co. Long Beach, Calif. 

Hygradc Food Products Corp, Detroit 



.■1 E* 



Internal :■ 

Seattle 
Knothe Brothers Co, N.Y. 
Lift- *x Casualty Insurance Co of Tennessee, 

Nashville 
Milwaukee File Co, Milwaukee 
National Sky Coach, S.F. 
Natural Health Products Co, Sarasota 
<>1-Thymc Medicine Co, Warren. O. 
Phi harmonic Radio & Television Corp, !\< 

Brunswick, N. J. 

Roxdalc Building Products Corp, N.Y. 

Seamprufe Inc, N.Y. 
Spring Garden Institute, Pbila. 
Sta Products Corp, Oakland 
Triangle Laboratory, Chi. 
Ljtica-Duxbak Corp, Utica 



Instant Whip whipped crea 

Airline 

Retai! shoe chain 

Sanitary hardware 

Home Pride bread 

Specialty store 

Van Merritt beer 

Airline 

Wild West toys 

Salt ed -in. t he-Shell peanuts 

Franciscan din iter ware 

Roll-A-Painter 

Department stores 

Sleep-Eze sedative 

Meat packers 



en Playground Association, Association 



Pajamas and belts 
Life insurance 

Li'l Sharpy files 
Nonacheduled airline 
Marvlizer liquefying machine 
Avole skin preparation 
Manufacturer 



AGENCY 



Prefabricated wallhuu 
Hosiery 

Technical school 
Sta-lIo-K for flowers 
Rid-X rodentieidc 
Sportsmen's clothing 



.1 



Davis & Co, L. A. 

Buchanan & Co, N.Y. 

Lane, N.Y. 

Shaw & Sehreiber, Phila. 

A. W. Lewin Co, N.Y. 

Foote, Cone & Belding, I.. A. 

Kaufman & Assoc, Chi. 

Monroe Greenthal Co, N.Y. 

John R. C. Williams. Pittsb. 

Firestone-Goodman, Mnpls. 

West-Marquis, L. A. 

Walters & Hcrkinger, Chi. 

McCann-Erickson, S. F. 

F.rwin. Wasey & Co, L. A. 

Brooke, Smith, French & Dorran 

Detroit 
James Lovirk & Co, Vancouver 

Hirshon-Garfield, N.Y. 

L. W. Roush Co, Nashville 

Louise Mark & Assoc. Milwaukee 

Van Slyck, S. F. 

Houck & Co of Florida. Miami 

Kenneth Rader Co, N.Y. 

A. D. Adams, N.Y. 

Hilton & Rigcio. N.Y. 
Bert Goldsmith, N.Y. 
Cray & Rogers, Phila. 
Jewell. Oakland 
M. M. Fisher. Chi. 
Harlow, Syracuse 



Numbers after names 
refer to category of 
listing on this page 

Dan. F. Gerber (3) 

John Allison (4) 

Ralph McKinnie (4) 

Howard Chapin (5) 

Ralph Cordiner (5) 



mMHMMIRMHMBjBajBiBjjBaBjjjjjjj' 




wlllie wish \ ^r ' 

makes only one resolution 

Yes, Willie's I resolution is to keep right 
on pulling a powerful load of sales for you_ 
in the Indianapolis market. 
Why don't you make a resolution to let Willie 
pull for you this coming year? 
Just contact any Free and Peters Colonel and 
ask for Willie's P. P. P. |: 
* (That's Pulling Power Proof) 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis . • • 



^Ew53 



nnJtS^lZ 



ITTTJrTrrTTTitifl 




OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

FREE & PETERS, Notional Repretentolives 



Stfe-Cftmu 




EXCLUSIVE 

NATIONAL 

REPRESENTATIVES 

EAST, SOUTHEAST 

Boston-Springfield WBZ-WBZA 

Buffalo WGR 

New York WMCA 

Philadelphia KYW 

Pittsburgh KDKA 

Syracuse WFBL 

Charleston, S. C* WCSC 

Columbia, S. C. WIS 

Norfolk WGH 

Raleigh WPTF 

Roanoke WDBJ 

MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 

Des Moines WHO 

Davenport WOC 

Decatur 

Duluth-Superior 

Fargo 



Fort Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 

Louisville 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 

Omaha 

Peoria 

St. Louis 

Beaumont 
Brownsville 
Corpus Christi 
Ft. Worth-Dallas 
Houston 
San Antonio 



WDZ 

WDSM 

WDAY 

WOWO 

WISH 

KMBC-KFRM 

WAVE 

WTCN 

KFAB 

WMBD 

KSD 

' KFDM 

KVAL 

KRIS 

WBAP 

KXYZ 

KTSA 



MOUNTAIN 

Albuquerque 

Boise 

Denver 

Honolulu-Hilo 

Portland, Ore. 

Seattle 



AND WEST 

KOB 

KDSH 

KVOD 

KGMB-KHBC 

KEX 

KIRO 





kucttf, TVitl $we tyou 

IDEA 

Sevea-')?t4si6et /4ucU&tce Sunvetf, 
TftacU faf *Pul4e, lac. fan *?%€€ & 'Pet&te K 

Xf you are now using radio news programs, this authoritative study will 
convince you how right you are ! 

If you have never used radio news, it will open your eyes to the spectacular 
possibilities of this proven medium. 

The Pulse Survey was made in seven representative markets — 
in both urban and surrounding communities of each — in markets 
with and without television outlets. It proves that radio is the top 
news source — that TV-receiver ownership does not materially 
reduce radio news listening— that radio news has unusually high 
sponsor identification — that radio news does sell merchandise. 

Write or telephone us now for your copy of "Radio News is Bigger Thar, 
You Think". You'll agree that by producing this study, Free & Peters has 
rendered a very distinct service to you and to the radio advertising industry 
as a whole. 

Free & Peters, inc. 

Pioneer Badio and Television Station Representatives 

Sina 1932 

NEW YORK CHICAGO 

ATLANTA DETROIT FT. WORTH HOLLYWOOD SAN FRANCISCO 



1,000 watts, clear channel 



Dixie's most progressive 
independent radio voice, ... 



You don't miss the 
BIG, buying 
when you bu 



beamed to th 
and the Rur^ 
a Great,"' 



A look 



Charleston, South Carolina 



contact: John E. Pearson Co,, 
>ra Dodson Agency 



Madison 



BEST SELLER 

You were one of the first publica- 
tions to give editorial support to 
"Building Up Your Congregation." 




Pleu+hner appeared on "Welcome Travelers" 

Now the book is a best seller in its 
specialized field and even rated a two- 
column write-up in an issue of Time 
Magazine. 

WlLLARD A. PLEUTHNER 

Vice President 

BBDO 

Neiv York 



GRAUER COMMENTS 

I was genuinely surprised and de- 
lighted when one of the executives at 
NBC nabbed me as I went by his office 
yesterday and showed me his copy of 
this month's sponsor — with my pitcher 
(and Lizabeth Scott's!) on the cover. 

I sensed that you'd do a thorough 
job when we had our several talks be- 
fore the holidays, but just how thor- 
ough and telling I didn't know, until 
I read that fine story you did about 
me. I've already had a number of 
very favorable comments and with 
sponsor's top-drawer circulation in the 
broadcasting business, I know there'll 
be many more. So I just wanted to 
send this little note of thanks for a 
handsome plug, and admiration for an 
excellent job. 

Ben Grauer 
NBC 
New York 



indeed good news. When he put aside 
his editorial pen (used for another 
publication) and joined Columbia, I 
felt that the trade had lost a powerful 
voice. It's good to see his stuff in 
print again. Our thanks to sponsor 
for making it possible. 

Earle G. Clement 
Sales Manager 
WBET, WBET-FM 
Brockton, Mass. 



RADIO: GUESSWORK MEDIUM 

Congratulations on your 1 January 
editorial. Unfortunately, it is a very 
true story. 

The broadcaster knows how produc- 
tive his station is. The question is, 
how do we prove it? Certainly surveys 
to date prove little. Sure it's an excuse 
to buy time, but is the sample a true 
indication? We know it isn't. 

When radio, through its national or- 
ganization, goes all-out on survey- 
methods radio will take its true place. 
When we get those second and third 
radios in the home listed with number 
of people listening, with larger sam- 
ples, we are going in the right direc- 
tion. 

I think a national radio organization 
would find many broadcasters willing 
to carry some of the burden. 

Ralph J. Robinson 
General Manager 
WACE 
Springfield, Mass. 



Thank you for the editorial appear- 
ing in the 1 January issue of sponsor. 
I think you have hit the nail right 
on die head and possibly this will 
wake NAB up to the fact that they 
must move and move fast. 

Willard C. Worcester 

General Manager 

WIRE 

Indianapolis 



LANDRY A SPONSOR REGULAR 

Your announcement that Bob Lan- 
dry's column is to appear regularly is 



Thanks for your editorial of 1 Jan- 
uary on Radio: guesswork medium. 
We folks out in the country have been 
watching the network and national ad- 
vertising dogfight about radio rates 
with more academic interest than ac- 
tual. Since we have no network pro- 
grams, our observations on radio rates 
are based only on spot business, of 
which we have a considerable amount 
for this section of the country. 

I have never felt that the arbitral \ 
rate structure of most radio stations 
on nighttime radio, i.e. doubling the 
(Please turn to page 72) 



16 



SPONSOR 



• • • • 




LOOK WHO'S LISTENING! 



In the rich Texas Gulf Coast area the by-word 
is buy radio. There's no better way to reach so 
many people at so little cost than via the micro- 
phone. In the 71 Texas Counties and Western 
Louisiana Parishes that make up the KTRH 
BMB coverage area there are today 2,629,600 
people, a big audience getting bigger every 
day. Population-wise, the Coast is an example 
of a rocketing market and listener-wise, it's 
growing, too, as evidenced by the 11.2'v hike 
in KTRH BMB families over Study No. 1. 



. AND TO WHAT 



50,000 WATT STATION! 



KTRH, of course — the leading Houston 
station in total BMB families. KTRH 
also ranks high inside Houston, Amer- 
ica's 14th market. According to the 
October-November Hooper Radio 
Audience Index, it's KTRH they're 
hearing most in three of the 
five-time-rated periods. 



KTRH 

CBS— Houston 

John Blair & Company — Nat'l Rep. 

50,000 Watts— 740 KC 



All sources available on request 







KTLN 



1000 

Wott* 



DENVER 



coverage 



KTLN Denver is the most pene 
• rating independent station in 
the area it serves. KTLN Denver 
is listened to by 240,000 radio 
families d^aily. 

sales potential 

KTLN Denver is heard in homes 
that spent $655,000,000 in re- 
tail sales in 1949 

year round audience 

KTLN Denver serves not only 
the cream of the Rocky Moun- 
tain area but the rich winter 
and summer play and vacation 
land. The Denver Convention 
and Visitors Bureau reports 
travel and resort spending in 
Colorado was $211,780,000 in 
1949. 

mail and phone pull 

KTLN Denver receives hundreds 
of thousands of letters and 
phone calls annually. Its Joe 
"Upsy Daisy" Flood program 
alone pulls over 4,000 phone 
calls weekly. 

results and cost 

At a cost of $672, one promo- 
tion* pulled over 4,500 re- 
sponses which in turn produced 
1,150 direct sales totaling 
$11,569. 
"client name & details on request 

SO 

YOUR BEST BUY IS 

■ f T| || 1000 Watts 

KILN Denver 

the independent station most often 
listened to by Colorado housewives 
for availabilities wire, phone or write 
Radio Representatives, Inc. or 

New York, Chicago, John Buchanan 

Los Angeles, Park Lone Hotel 

San Francisco Denver 

KTLN 1 

DENVER IljJJ 




3Mr. Sponsor 



Gerald Light 

Sales promotion and advertising manager 
Emerson Radio and Phonograph Corporation, N. Y. 



18 



Gerald Light, sales promotion and advertising manager for the 
Emerson Radio and Phonograph Corporation, is selling radio and 
TV via radio and TV. 

The company spent over $6,000,000 during 1950 to maintain its 
boast that somebody buys an Emerson every five seconds. Light 
splits the ad budget equally between national and local advertising. 

"We use all media, but favor radio and TV," says the dark, be- 
spectacled advertising manager who looks as young as his 33 years. 
"We get intense impact from TV, and radio opens a market to us 
from non-TV users." 

About half the company's national budget goes to TV. For 26 
weeks last year Emerson sponsored Toast of the Town over CBS-TV. 
This was dropped in favor of The Clock, seen over 21 stations of 
the NBC-TV network Friday, 9:30 to 10:00 p.m. Commercials are 
presented as straight demonstrations — no jingles, no animations, no 
comedy — and plug both radio and TV receivers. 

The local half of the budget goes chiefly to radio and newspaper, 
with a small amount to spot TV. Since a major portion of this is 
expended in dealer co-op advertising, accurate figures of the media 
breakdown are not available. "We do know that a large part of this 
local budget is devoted to spot radio," says Light. 

He hinted that the company's plans for 1951 include a more in- 
tensified radio effort in all areas; probably a major campaign about 
which he couldn't tip his hand now. But he indicated that it would 
not mean a cut-back on TV advertising. 

The company expects production of radio and TV sets during 
1951 to be just half of 1950 production, at best. Sales for 1950 
amounted to $75,000,000, were headed for $110,000,000 before the 
material shortage set in. Still sales were more than twice the 1949 
figure. Just a few days ago the company produced its 12 millionth 
radio receiver. 

Light has been with the company seven years, started as a techni- 
cal writer in 1944. He was boosted to service department manager 
in 1946, and assistant sales manager in 1948. Last year he was made 
manager of sales and advertising. The job is a long jump from his 
pre-medical and engineering education at Union College, but no mure 
so than his first job after college — manager of a retail jewelry chain. 

SPONSOR 









■ I 




t 






advertising the products of 
Westinghouse...a 

and the top dramatic show 
■n all television. 

For another good buy, 
turn the page. 




New developments on SPONSOR stories 



Sc©. "Hadaeol packs 'em in" 

Issue: 18 December 1950, p. 24 

Subject: Tonic promotion 



Senator Dudley LeBlane. president of the LeBlane Corporation, 
which makes Hadaeol. has taken a running start into 1951 at a 
$1,000,000 a month advertising pace. 

Success with past advertising and promotional campaigns, de- 
scribed by SPONSOR in "Hadaeol packs 'em in." 18 December 1950, 
particularly recent Christmas parties, are chief reasons for the pres- 
ent all-out drive. 

About 809c of the 500 theatres putting on Hadaeol Christina- 
parties in cooperation wiih radio stations were filled to capacity, 
and thousands of children had to be turned away, the company re- 
ports. LeBlane used 80 trailer trucks to distribute half a million 
toys to stations: toys had an average retail value of $1. More than 
500 Schwinn Bicycles were given to kids with most Hadaeol box tops. 

Magnitude of one local promotion job for an Xmas party is re- 
ported by WLOW. Norfolk. The station leased five theatres to present 
a 90-minute show to 6.000 children, gave them a total of $8,000 
worth of presents. At each theatre, a city official delivered a message 
of welcome to the kids, and each theatre entertained about 100 under- 
privileged children as guests of the company and the station. 

The Norfolk party climaxed a month-long promotion campaign 
which included 50 billboards, newspaper advertising space and sto- 
ries, five motion picture trailers daily in each theatre, theatre lobby 
displays and marquee ads. and drug and grocery store sale promo- 
tion banners. Big blow was heaviest schedule of advertising WLOW 
ever had aired for any one client, included 24 announcements daily, 
two half-hour programs, and one quarter-hour program. 

WNOE, New Orleans, reported that kids lined up for two city 
blocks to attend Hadaeol Christmas party staged by the station. 

Hadaeol is now out to crack the West Coast markets, has bought 
12 announcements daily on each of 16 radio stations in the Los An- 
geles area and is using five testimonial ads weekly in all newspapers. 
Results: advance orders from Los Angeles chains and distributors for 
Hadaeol are now said to be in excess of $1,000,000. 

Just a few days ago the company spent $50,000 for time and talent 
on a special 30-minute variety program from Hollywood. 

Advertising and promotion should bring Hadacol's wholesale sales 
volume for 1951 to between $75,000,000 and $100,000,000. accord- 
ing to Senator LeBlane. 



See: "When is it safe to simulcast?" 

ISSne: 25 September 1950, p. 26 

Subject: Simulcasts 



With a few exceptions, simulcasts, as pointed out by SPONSOR in 
"When is it safe to simulcast," 25 September 1950, have not been 
too successful. But now NBC is taking a second stab at simulcasts. 

In recent months, simulcast shows have ironed out many of the 
bugs and NBC will try out several new ones. Much of the pressure 
for the move comes from TV sponsors who want to hit the non-TV 
areas as well. 

American Forum of the Air became a simulcast last November. 
This month four shows will be added: Pick A Hit; Phil Baker Quiz 
Show; The Magnificent Montague; and Three on a Honeymoon. 




COVERAGE 

Sure... We've Got It 

BUT... 

Like the Gamecock's 
Spurs... It's the 

PENETRATION 

WSPA*™ a 



In This 
Prosperous 




& 



ooV^ 

BMB Report No. 2 Shows 
WSPA With The Largest 
Audience Of Any Station 
In The Area! 

AND... This Hooper 
Report Shows How WSPA 
Dominates This Area! 



HOOPER RATING -Winter 


1949 


8:00 AM - 12:00 N 


63.2 


12:00 N •■ 6:00 PM 


53.6 


(Monday thru Friday) 




6:00 PM •• 10:00 PM . . . 


67.6 


(Sunday thru Saturday) 





GIVE YOUR SALES 
A POTENT PERMANENT HYPO 




Represented By: 

John Blair & Co. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 
Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



CBS Station For The 
Spartanburg-Greenville 
Market 



5,000 Watts -- 
950 On Your Dial 



15 JANUARY 1951 



21 



w 



got a whim 

getawhim 



you // come 
back 



r more 



*Headley-Reed 

will give you full 
details of the 

many national 
advertisers selling 
on WHIM. 



1,000 WATTS 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



/TIN 



fffino 



VllW 




Reader inquiries below were answered recent- 
ly by SPONSOR'S Research Dept. Answers 
are provided by phone or mail. Call Ml). 
8-2772; write 510 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 



O. Has there been any study made of the effect of television and 
radio on newspaper and magazine reading habits? 

Advertising agency, New York 

A. The following sponsor articles may prove helpful: 19 June 
1950 "What pulls 'em in"; 3 July "Applause"; 17 July "What 
media team up best with TV?"; and "Sponsor Speaks" in the 
same issue. 

O. Would you please tell us what transcribed government and/or 
public service shows are available and suitable for sponsorship 
on a local basis? Radio station manager, Fitchburg, Mass. 

A. There are so many transcribed public service shows avail- 
able for local sponsorship, we suggest you write to the National 
Association of Broadcasters for information. Address Mr. Rob- 
ert K. Richards, Director of Public Affairs, NAB. 1771 "N" 
Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Q. Who is the advertising agency for Nescafe? 

Film production organization, New York 

A. The account is handled by Cecil & Presbrey, 247 Park 
Avenue, New York. 

Q. Can you give us the names of a few advertising agencies that do 
business beamed at the Spanish audience? 

Radio station manager, Rosenburg, Tex. 

A. Lennen & Mitchell, 17 East 45th Street; Batten. Barton, Dur- 
stine & Osborn, 383 Madison Avenue; Duane Jones, 570 Lexing- 
ton Avenue; Emil Mogul, 250 West 57th Street, all New York. 

O. We want to make a presentation to a tobacco company for a 
radio announcement campaign; can you give us some informa- 
tion that would prove helpful? Advertising agency. New York 

A. sponsor has had several stories and features on what to- 
bacco companies are doing in the air. They include: "The spon- 
sor hits a home run," 9 May 1949; J. Whitney Peterson, U. S. 
Tobacco Co., profile, 29 August 1949; "Millions more call for 
Philip Morris," 24 October 1949; Mail Pouch Tobacco P. S., 27 
March, 1950, p. 6; "No hiatus on sales," 8 May 1950 (in same 
issue, capsule case history, Wally Frank, p. 46) ; "Fall forecast 
for sponsors," 17 July 1950; and a two part story on Brown & 
Williamson in the 6 November and 20 November 1950 issues. 

Q. What information can you give us on trademarks and their rec- 
ognition before and after the use of TV? 

Advertising agency, Chicago 

A. Herbert True's study on TV sponsor identification in Chicago 
should be helpful. The study appeared in our 6 November 1950 
issue. Previous sponsor articles on the subject include: "How's 
your sponsor identification?", 20 June ]949 and "Juvenile TV 
shows," 26 September 1949 issue. 



22 



SPONSOR 



A WINNING MARKET! 

Mr. Harry D. Sims, Jr., of Chandler & Rudd 
Company, Cleveland, wins the grand prize 
in the first CBS-WGAR display contest. 
Sponsors using WGAR reach another win- 
ning market in Northern Ohio. Population 
up 15.4%. Radio homes up 27.8%. And 
WGAR first with listeners in 29 out of 44 
daytime rated quarter-hours . . . more than 
all other Cleveland stations combined! 





OPERATION SNOWBOUND! 

WGAR dug in as Northern Ohio dug out of the 
greatest snowstorm in years. What PRICE co- 
operation? Even Georgie Price, noted comedian 
in town for an engagement, pitched in with 
WGAR personnel answering 44,5 50 telephone 
distress calls in a three-day period. Letters poured 
in saying "Thanks for your superb public service!" 



mA/ottfabH, O/Uo.. 






the SPOT for SPOT RADIO 




FREE 
SPEECH JL: 

MIKE 



MR. MERVIN B. FRANCE (left) 

president of Society for Savings, 
Cleveland, has served on commit- 
tees for the American Bankers 
Association, National Association of 
Mutual Savings Banks, and Invest- 
ment Bankers Association. He is trustee 
of University Hospital and Mount 
Union College. Dr. Rudolph Ringwall 
(right), associate conductor of the 
Cleveland Orchestra, presents Sunday 
afternoon recorded concerts for Society 
for Savings. 




NEWS, MUSIC, SPORTS . . : 

listeners like all sorts. Take 
your choice. Jack Dooley 
reports the news nightlv at 
11:00 P. M. Paul Wilcox 
scores with sports at 11:10 
P. M. And Morgan's Musical 
Inn opens at 11:15 P.M. 
Reach a responsive night- 
time audience with these 
wide-awake features. 



JACK 
DOOLEY 



WGAR 



Cleveland 



RADIO . . . AMERICA'S 

50,000 wafts . . . CBS 



HAL 

MORGAN 



GREATEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Company 



15 JANUARY 1951 



23 



* 1 




AND COMPANY 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
CH ICAGO 

DETROIT 
^ SAN FRANCISCO 
ATLANTA 
HOLLYWOOD 



RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 





I 






LONNV 

MIL 



MOM! 




\ 



"QUIZ KIDS" ATTRACT MIDDLE-AGED AND OLDER LISTENERS.A PRIME MARKET FOR ALKA-SELTZER. ITS THEIR OLDEST SHOW 

The Ilka-Seltzer storv 

In darkest depression days, Miles turned to radio with rural-style 
shows like WLS "Barn Danee ? "; now" is among top 10 national sponsors 




over-all 



"Alka-Seltzer and radio 
have dovetailed into one of 
those perfect unions. We knew we had 
a good product, hut we never could 
have told America about it so quickly 
and effectively without radio." 

That's the story of the commercial 
success of Alka-Seltzer, as put in a 
nutshell by Charles S. Beardsley, chair- 
man of the board of Miles Labora- 
tories, Inc. Perhaps the epic tale of 
how radio can build fortunes for 
skilled advertisers, the Alka-Seltzer 
story begins back during the darkest 
days of the depression, in 1932. 

Alka-Seltzer was then the newest 

15 JANUARY 1951 



product of the venerable I founded 
1884) Miles firm. For its new remedy, 
Miles decided to try a new method of 
advertising. On 10 January, 1932, 
over WLS, Chicago, the firm assumed 
sponsorship of Songs of Home Sweet 
Home through the Wade Advertising 
Agency, Chicago. 

That on; program buy was to set a 
pattern which remained basically un- 
changed through 18 years of profitable 
over-the-air selling. Miles' success with 
its first rural, homey program was im- 
mediate. Soon after the first Alka- 
Seltzer commercials told that a new 
fizzing antacid analgesic was available. 



druggists in Chicago were selling four 
times the quantity of the average drug- 
gist in other communities where the 
product got no air advertising. 

Since then Miles' expenditure for 
radio, about 85 c /t of its ad budget, has 
increased until the companv presenllv 
i^ putting over $8,000,000 a year in!<> 
the medium. Tiie firm ranks among 
the top 10 advertisers in radio and the 
top 25 advertisers in all media. 

Eighteen years of experience with 
radio programing, implemented In 
Hooper. Nielsen, and Schvverin re- 
search has gone into development of 
the Alka-Seltzer approach to air adver- 



25 



9P 






tising. It is based on: 

1. Repetitive impact. (Four 15-min- 
ute network shows across the board.) 

2. Programing that hits at different 
segments of the audience, including 
young and old. 

3. Spreading the huge budget among 
medium or low-budget shows. 

4. Long-time sponsorship of such 
programs as the Quiz Kids from 1940 
on; the WLS National Barn Dance 
from 1933 to 1946; Lurn and Abner 
fiom 1941 to 1948. 

The Saturday night Barn Dance was 
the outstanding Miles show in a long 
series of programs with a rural flavor. 
Until the last few years most of the 
Alka-Seltzer radio money has been 
spent on such programs as Barn Dance, 
Uncle Ezra, Hoosier Editor, Friendly 
Neighbors, Lurn and Abner, and Herb 
Shriner. A good chunk of Miles pro- 
motion, especially the famous Miles 
Almanac, had long been aimed at the 
rural markets where self-medication is 
usually more prevalent. 

But with the dropping of the Barn 
Dance in 1946, Miles began shifting 
over to programs with a broader ap- 
peal. The drug firm wanted larger 
sales in the metropolitan areas without 
losing any of their rural following. 

In 1951. these are the programs that 
are bringing the Alka-Seltzer message 
to 31,000.000 families weekly out of 
42.000,000 U.S. radio families. 



Yens of the World 
One Man's Family 



NBC 

7:30-7:45 p.m., Monday- 
Frie 



7:15-8 p.m., Monday-Fri- 
day 
3:30-4 p.m., Sunday 
8-8:30 p.m.. Friday 
CBS 
5:45-6 p.m. Monday-Fri- 
day except for WCBS, 
New York which carries 
the show at 6:30 p.m. 
3:15-3:30 p.m.. Monday- 
Friday 

Duo Lee (Pacific Coast) 
Newspaper o) the Air 10-10:15 a.m. and 9-9:15 
a.m.. Monday. Sat unlay 



Quiz Kids 
Quiz Kids (TV) 

Curl Masses 



llillinp House 




Rural shines built btiles: Uncle Ezra and "Barn Dance" played the key role 



(Alka-Seltzer is stressed on all the 
shows, while oilier Miles products, 
Bactine, Tabcin and One-A-Day Vita- 
mins, receive secondary mention.) 

The Miles Historical Almanac of the 
Air, a series of one-minute announce- 
ments promoting the Nervine sedative, 
is carried in New England, and the 
Southern and Western parts of the 
country. 

The news shows and the Quiz Kids 



have a particularly strong following 
among the older folks, who are particu- 
lary prone to the many aches and pains 
that Alka - Seltzer soothes. Hilltop 
House, a superior daytime serial, is 
aimed at the housewives, who make 
two-thirds of all the drug purchases. 
Miles also used segments of two MBS 
shows. Queen for a Day and Ladies 
Fair, to reach this same audience. The 
drug firm's other dramatic show, One 



■•'•>•>- I. / lf»; "Natl Barn Dance" was longest on schedule f •/-* i " !«-# Jo! Comics Lum and Abner climaxed rural programing phase 






Alka-Seltzer 



<n 



K 




* fcV 




><•!€• approach IS broader: Singer Martha Tilton appeals to city and rural alike 



Mans Family, attracts what could be 
called a general family group of lis- 
teners. And singers Curt Massey and 
Martha Tilton provide a bright pro- 
gram of popular tunes that is beamed 
at listeners below 25. Miles wants 
these jazz enthusiasts to be Alka- 
Seltzer conscious when they are 
bothered by the ailments of more ma- 
ture years. 

The Miles radio effort doesn't stop 



outside U.S. borders. "Listen to it fizz" 
and "Watch the bubbles spin around" 
is heard throughout the Western hemis- 
phere (except for Chile and Argentina) 
and South Africa. The foreign radio 
budget, running to several hundred 
thousand dollars a year, emphasizes 
announcements supplemented by news, 
musical shows, and a few sports broad- 
casts. Results: "Fantastic," says Rob- 
ert Otto & Company, Inc., New York, 



the agen<\ which bandies the Miles 
export advertising. 

So far the advent of TV has not ai- 
fected Miles domestic radio efforts, ex- 
cept for addition of the video version 
of tbe Quiz Kids. This does not mean 
the Wade Agency and its client are 
unconcerned over the rise of the new 
medium. Les Waddington, able Miles 
radio TV director said recently: "If 
the major networks and the individual 
stations who have spawned and devel- 
0] 'il both tbese media would only act 
like the two are related instead of pro- 
moting one against the other and show 
them and the advertiser how they can 
live and grow together, this transition 
could be happier and easier." 

Nothing official is being said about 
future plans, but experimental TV 
spots, to test certain visual appeals, 
are definitely in the 1951 picture. 

Appraising the pull of the skilfulK 
I 'tanned Miles radio promotion now is 
more difficult than in the early days 
of rapid expansion. The dimensions of 
Miles sales are a closely guarded secret 
in a highly competitive field. But trade 
estimates put the Klkhart. I rid., firm's 
total ad budget at between $10,000,000 
and $12,000,000. Since about 35' ; of 
Miles sales is said to go into advertis- 
ing, this would put sales somewhere 
between $30,000,000 and $36,000,000. 

Alka-Seltzer runs ahead of its 
rival, Bromo Seltzer, long established 
in the field, at perhaps three to one. 
Bromo moves better at the fountain 
but in total sales Alka-Seltzer is far 
ahead. Bromo is promoted with a con- 
siderable number of radio and TV an- 
nouncements plus the Hollywood Star 
Theater (CBS, 8-8:30 p.m., Mondays.) 
Time and talent costs for the Bromo 
network show are estimated at about 
$18,000 a week. 

(Please turn to page 53) 



1941 tO present: Miles favors news shows like Beatty's on NBC I it /.">- I .*> If): MBS' "Queen for a Day" drew housewife listeners 




mm 




>^^a>^fj^*fe^ 




EXTENSIVE RESEARCH GUIDES AGENCY: DR. HERZOG, AIDES, BRIEF RADIO/TV DEPT. ON RESULTS OF COMMERCIAL TEST 



Inside the agencies: 
a SPONSOR series 



Hi Cann-Erickson 



starts with research 

This is the way the ageney gathers the faets it needs to make 
the most effieient use of its elients air advertising dollars 



over-all 



When the Research Section 
of the American Associa- 
tion of Advertising Agencies Eastern 
annual meeting got underway this Oc- 
loher. four speakers got up in turn. 
The) were Alfred Politz. Dick Hol- 
brook, Or. Hans Zeisel, and Dr. Herta 
Herzog, each of them conceded to he 
experts in their field. 

I he composition of the panel was a 
tribute, in effect, to McCann-Erickson. 
Inc. for psychologist Herta Herzog is 
manager of its radio/TV research di- 
vision; statistical expert Hans Zeisel 



28 



had only recently left the agency as 
manager of media research to become 
director of research for The Tea Bu- 
reau. 

McCann-Erickson s Central Research 
Department, located on the 11th floor 
of 50 Rockefeller Plaza, ranks at or 
very near the top of any list of research 
departments. And with good reason. 
Resides the high caliber of the depart- 
ment's director and division managers 
(each of the managers has enough 
background to direct the research de- 
partment of an average agency), heavy 



support comes from top management. 

Agencv president Marion Harper, 
Jr. is a former research director of the 
agency. Though forced to limit his 
interest in routine operations of the 
research department. Harper neverthe- 
less initiates many of its projects. Re- 
searchers know, too, that when the 
time comes to present research find- 
ings on a problem, he can be depended 
on to ask the toughest questions. 

Research, merchandising, media, and 
sales promotion form the important 
component parts of any major agency's 

SPONSOR 



total marketing services. Recognizing 
a need to integrate these departmental- 
ly separate operations — and to conduct 
marke'ing planning as a total function 
— McCann-Erickson established a divi- 
sion of Marketing Services comprising 
all operational departments other than 
the creative and administrative serv- 
ices; it includes Research; Media in all 
branches; Merchandising and Sales 
Promotion, and is under the direction 
of Sidney W. Dean. Jr., as Vice Presi- 
dent in charge of Marketing Services. 

Prior to joining McCann-Erickson, 
Dean was a vice president of J. Wal- 
ter Thompson, where he was an ac- 
count executive, manager of the trade 
and technical department, and Director 
of Media. In 1941, he left J. W. 
Thompson to serve the government as 
a consultant in Lend-Lease administra- 
tion, and OSS. Since the war he has 
been a consultant in marke ing and 
management and executive vice presi- 
dent of the Telecoin Corporation. 

Over-all direction of the research de- 
parement's many projects comes from 
Donald B. Armstrong. Jr.. blond, youth- 
ful research director. Armstrong has 
been with the agency for four years, 
was recently rewarded with a vice pres- 
idency. Starting in research originalK 
with Young & Rubicam, Inc., in 1939, 
Don Armstrong spent two years as su- 
pervisor of market research there. Then 
followed three years as manager of 
copy and radio research wi ; h the same 
agency, topped off by two years as an 
associate director immediately respon- 
sible to Dr. Gallup. 

Research Director Armstrong ex- 
presses in his activities the company's 
philosophy of '"integrated" research. 
Centralized coordination of the many- 
hundreds of projects that go through 
his department in the course of a year 
permits him to supervise planning and 
policy between research and the other 
departments of the agency, on the ac- 
count as well as the creative level. As 
a member of the top brass advisory 
commi.tee, through which all advertis- 
ing plans are processed, Armstrong is 
in an ideal position to "sell" research 
as well as to apply the objective and 
factual yardstick to agency operations. 

Working with Don Armstrong are 
four associates, each supervising a spe- 
cialized area of research: William R. 
Wallace manages market research; 
Russell Schneider handles copy re- 
search; Stanley D. Canter is the media 
research expert; and Herta Herzog is 
{Please turn to page 46) 




Key research tool is Stanton-Lazarsfeld Program Analyzer which produces reactions graph 
Test panel hoars, views program; pressing Like or Dislike button shows various response 




Less than half of agency's large Research Dept. appears here. Director Armstrong, left 
Assistants (seated) H. Herzog, Wm. Wallace, Russ Schneider, D. Humphrey, Stan Canter 




Account executive gets television research proposal worked up by department staff 



15 JANUARY 1951 



29 




lii.t- 



Saleslady Maggi McNellis successfully pushes Tintair on CBS-TV "Somerset Maugham Theatre' 



Three nten spearhetnl 

pioneering hair 

tint radio/TV campaign 




M. L. Straus, II Carl Byolr 



Philip Kalech • 



Three men, each a leader in his field, spear- 
headed Tintair's smash hit campaign. Martin 
L. Straus, II, Bymart president, is from St. 
Louis, studied at Dartmouth and Illinois Uni- 
versity. When he was with Eversharp, he de- 
veloped a discreet campaign to sell luxury ra- 
zors for women worried about hair on legs. 
At 54, he likes being a gentleman farmer at 
his Great Barrington, Mass., country place. 



Carl Byoir, who handled Tintair promotion, 
was born in Des Moines, la., is a graduate of 
U. of Iowa and Columbia Law School. He's 
noted for organizing the President's Birthday 
Balls, handling the A & P's current P.R. cam- 
paign. Philip Kalech, who heads Tintair's sales 
organization of 90 men, is from Hartford, 
Conn., graduate of Georgia Tech. He was 
brought over from a top selling role with Toni. 



Tintair 



learns 



from 



Toni 



30 



Million-dollar budget 
booms home hair 

coloring sales 



Until recently, an American 
woman entering a depart- 
ment or drug store to buy a package 
of hair dye made her purchase with 
all the furtive guilt of a Mrs. Casper 
Milquetoast asking for a slug of co- 
caine. But four months ago advertis- 
ing-conscious Martin L. Straus, II, for- 
mer board chairman of Eversharp, 
Inc., and promotion-conscious Carl 
Byoir, public relations czar, joined 
forces to make home hair coloring re- 
spectable. 

How are they achieving an almost- 
overnight social revolution? By: 

1. Setting up their own firm, By- 
mart, Inc. — a fusion of Byoir's last 
name, "By," and Straus's first name, 
"Mart." 

2. Launching a new, inexpensive 
($2.69) hair home coloring called 
Tintair. 

3. Unleashing a shrewd radio/TV 
merchandising campaign (Meet Frank 
Sinatra Show on CBS and Somerset 
Maugham Theatre on CBS-TV). 

sponsor's behind-the-scenes report 
reveals what happens when a pioneer- 
ing firm leads a whole industry toward 
radio/TV. So joyous is Tintair with 
its radio/TV results that it's diving in- 

SPONSOR 



to the broadcasting media even further. 
Beginning 20 January, it will spend 
$3,000 weekly on a half-hour Saturday 
morning radio drama over CBS (Som- 
erset Maugham Radio Theatre, 11:30 
a.m. to 12 noon). Since 5 January, it 
has been spending $7,500 weekly to 
participate in DuMont's Cavalcade of 
Stars and Cavalcade oj Bands. 

Straus, president of Bymart, predicts 
that Tintair will do lor America's hair 
color what the home Toni Wave has 
done for its curl. 

He points out that home permanent 
wave preparations snatched $70,000,- 
000 worth of business away from the 
beauty salons last year. And now he 
says the introduction of Tintair will 
"open the hair coloring business to the 
nation's department and drug stores — 
and move a substantial percentage of 
the estimated $100,000,000 now being 
spent in beauty parlors for hair tint- 
ing into their cash registers." 

The Straus forecast that sales of hair 
coloring will "increase by 300% in 
1951 alone" seems far from bluster. 
By the end of the first three months 
in 1951, Tintair will have shelled out 
more than $1,000,000 in national ad- 
vertising — largely in radio/TV appro- 
priations. That money will have paid 
off handsomely. 

Already, the demand from retailers 
is so strong that Tintair's distribution 
hasn't been able to keep up with the 
bombardment of orders (estimated at 
well over $750,000 in the first three 
months of the campaign). The firm's 
plant at Long Island City, N. Y., is now 
beginning to ship its products through- 
out the nation in freight car lots. 

What's more, the dynamic Tintair 
campaign has sparked the entire home 
hair coloring industry. Several older 
firms, which had hemmed and hawed 
at the notion of entering radio/TV, 
now are stepping up advertising. 

The inside story of Tintair's phe- 
nomenal growth should be of interest 
to other broadcast advertisers for what 
it reveals of teamwork between adver- 
tising and promotion know-how — with 
an extra touch of initiative added. The 
story began over a year ago, when 
Straus's wife, Anne, came home one 
day, praising the marvelous new hair- 
tint treatment she had received at a 
Fifth Avenue, New York, beauty salon. 

"There's no reason why a hair tint 
— like the one I've just had — couldn't 
be applied safely and inexpensively in 
the home," she commented conversa- 
tionally to her husband. 




Tintair now participates in two DuMont Shows: "Cavalcade of Bands,'' "Cavalcade of otars" 



Instead of bypassing the casual re- 
mark, something clicked in Straus's 
mind. He began thinking in terms of 
the fantastic success that the Toni 
home permanent had achieved. Why 
not do the same with a hair color prep- 
aration? 

"Where did you say you got this 
tint treatment?" he asked. 

"At Edmond's." 

Donu Edmond proved to be a dap- 
perly moustached fellow, son of an 
Egyptian sculptor, former royal hair- 
dresser to Queen Marie of Roumania. 
originator of the famous platinum 
blonde for movie actress Jean Harlow, 
and for 30 years one of Fifth Avenue's 
leading beauty consultants. Edmond 
was more than an ordinary beautician. 
Over the past three years, he and his 
partner, Jean Grimault. a Parisian 
chemist, had been experimenting to 
find what they consider the perfect hair 
coloring preparation. 



They believed they had it in a for- 
mula that could be broken down into 
12 different shades, required no sham- 
pooing or pre-bleaching, and could be 
applied by a woman in the home with 
a brush within at least 25 minutes. 
Indeed, within three years, they had 
tried the hair restorer-and-colorer on 
15,000 women, and it had passed the 
tests of three dermatologists as "clini- 
cally safe." 

After making sure that the product 
was tested by such dermatologists as 
Dr. Louis Schwartz and Miss Florence 
Wall, A.M., F.A.I.C, Straus was ready 
to drop his job as board chairman of 
Eversharp and sink his money into the 
new hair coloring. He got Byoir to 
join him as vice president and chair- 
man of the executive committee of By- 
mart, Inc. Not wanting to miss a good 
bet, he also lured into the fold as sales 
manager. Philip Kalech, formerly ex- 
( Please turn to page 63) 



$7,500-a-week "Sinatra Show," CBS radio, draws swooning bobbysoxers into drugstores 




Spot Programing 
Status Report 




| Co-op show study launched series 
in SPONSOR (20 November issue) 




2 Transcription services' part in 
spot picture followed (4 December) 





PART FOUR 



fliisir lilii'iirii's 



3 Local live programs roundup 
gave another angle (19 December) 



They boast long roster of loeal sponsors; 

but national, regional advertisers negleet thein 

despite low eost, other advantages 






*X Listeners in Dayton, Ohio, 
were taken by surprise re- 
cently when an announcer 
apologized for not delivering a com- 
mercial. It was a Sunday afternoon 
program on station WING called Cav- 
alcade of Music. 

Seems the sponsor. Ray Simons, Inc.. 
had sold all his used cars with the 
program's help. The scowls of Simons' 
competitors would have deepened had 
they known how inexpensive talent 
costs were. Cavalcade of Music is one 
of several scripted shows sent to WING 
as part of their Lang-Worth library 
service. Auto dealers, jewelers, gro- 
cers, and a host of other successful 
retailers have profited from network 
caliber programs like this, sent as a 
% 




regular music library service to radio 
station subscribers. 

All of the nine nationally distributed 
music libraries have long list of spon- 
sors for their scripted "shows." These 
lists are crowded with the names of lo- 
cal retailers. But national and regional 
advertisers are scarce as hen's teelh. 
Apparently word of music library pro- 
grams, like similarly slighted farm 
service programs, hasn't percolated 
above the local level. 

With national advertiser interest cen- 
tered strongly on spot radio, it's odd 
that such wonderful buys are still rela- 
tively unnoticed. This is what music 
library shows do for a sponsor: 

1. Provide nationally known talent 
al a low cost. Talent fee on many me- 



dium-sized stations SI. 00 per minute; 
on some stations nothing. 

2. Provide long, integrated series of 
programs arranged and paced especial- 
ly for balanced radio listening. Con- 
tinuity, timing, and format are pro- 
vided by library program experts. 
Some shows even have "voice tracks" 
of the stars themselves to go with mu- 
sic. 

3. Combine professional music, pro- 
gram, and script talent with the appeal 
of local announcing. They approach 
open-end transcriptions in uniformity 
for sponsors interested in multiple 
markets. 

4. The majority of stations have at 
least one library service, some more 
than one. Since library services tend 





C. P. MacGregor narrates lead-in; singer Mirdy Carson with Associated's Andy Wissell; Susan Reed is harpist for World's "Forward America" 






Left: Skitch Henderson, orchestra, play melodic sketches for Capitol 
"Kay Starr Time" is popular Standard series featuring girl vocalist 



Left: Singer Fran Warren stars in show produced by RCA Thesaurus 
Solo trumpeter sparks orchestra in one of Lang-Worth's musical shows 



to be sold to a single station in a mar 
ket, chances for an exclusive program 
in that market are excellent. This 
means better audience, higher sponsor 
identification. I It doesn't apply to ma- 
jor cities where services are usualh 
not sold exclusively.) 

5. Clear, high-fidelity reproduction 
is insured on vinyl plastic; little de- 
terioration of sound quality with con- 
tinued use. 

Don't be confused by the term music 
library. (In fact, "music service" 
would be more appropriate.) They 
stopped being just a collection of in- 
dexed records a few years after their 
start in the early 1930's. Today, a li- 
brary scripted show sounds like practi- 
cally any network musical program. 
Just as an example, take Concert Hall 
of the Air. This is a half-hour show 
that can be put on once-a-week or more 
often, if desired. An RCA Thesaurus 
program, it lines up an average of 
eight selections for each unit, played 
by a special orchestra under direction 
of Arthur Fiedler. Pianist Earl Wild 
and baritone Thomas L. Thomas are 
regularly featured. 

Here's how any local radio station 
can expertly put on a half hour of con- 



cert music without knowing a fiddle 
from a feather-duster. The announcer 

picks up tbe script for program num- 
ber 196S. then pulls out the 
oids it sa\s he will need fur the pro- 
gram. He rehearses reading the open 
ing line: "Ladies and gentlemen, the 
Concert Hall of the Air, Arthur Fied- 
ler conducting." Theme music (Cfit- 
resse) is held for 18 seconds while tin' 
announcer reads a short explanation of 
what is to follow. Then eight selec- 
tions follow, interspersed with brief de- 
scriptions of the pieces. 

Every one of the nine companies sur- 
veyed has a sizable slock of scripted 
programs "pre-produced" like this 
RCA Thesaurus example. Lang-Worth. 
\\ in Id Broadcasting System, Standard 
Program Library, Associated Program 
Service, and RCA Thesaurus each have 
between 15 and 30 of them. 

With over 100 "packaged" music 
programs of top quality circulating to 
500 stations or more around the coun- 
try (though not all 100 going to each 
station) why hasn't there been more 
national advertiser interest? The an- 
swer lies in traditional music library 
selling methods. Libraries have been, 
and probablv always will be. sold di- 



rect!) to radio stations. I p in now it - 
been the station's chore to sell as man) 
-' ripted and unscripted programs from 
die librar) as it could. Librarj sales- 
men have long pointed out that 1>\ sell- 
ing even one such program the sta- 
tion can write off its $100 to $300 
monthl) rental fee. But it's a rare sta- 
I'mn that will tr\ tackling Madison 
\\cnue from Fort Worth, Texas or 
-nme equally distant point. After all. 
the local butcher is just around the 
corner. 

rhis is not to sa\ that radio station 
representatives, who are on Madison 
Vvenue. don't do a selling job. Main 
of them have sold music library pro- 
grams for their stations. Probablv even 
more programs could be sold the same 
way. 

A change is coming, however, and 
quickly. In the past two or three 
years, transcribed music libraries have 
been taking a new tack. Disturbing 
numbers of subscribers have been 
dropping one of their libraries, if they 
have two: others have been dropping 
the only one they had to cut overhead. 
! he economic squeeze is on, especiallv 
for post-war beginners who have not 
I Please turn to page 66 I 



Typical it in* i<* library programs 



COMPANY 


PROGRAM 


TYPE 


LENGTH* 


TIMES 
PER WEEK* 


TYPICAL SPONSORS 


ASSOCIATED 
PROGRAM 


THE STARS SING 


Popular voeal. top 
talent 


15 


min. 


6 


Westinghouse Dealers, WEEU. Reading. Pa. 
Todd's Appliances, WSAL, Logansport, Ind. 


SERVICE 


MUSIC FOR AMERICA 


Musical re* lew 


30 


rain. 


1 


Mlddletown Memorial Park, WCNX. Middle- 


151 West 46th St. 
New York, N. Y. 


CANDLELIGHT AND SILVER 


Dinner inusie 


30 


mill. 


(• 


town, Conn. 
Arvan Industries, WCSI, Columbus. Ind. 
Blueficld 1 >.-;,!. Store. WKOY, ltlu. Geld, Va 
Household Finanee Corp., CKCR. Kitchener, 

Ontario 




CURTAIN CALLS 


Sin,*, tunes 


30 


min. 




JonesviUe Trading Post. W IVH. ( oldwater, 

Mich. 
Four Wheel Drive Co.. W.NAM. Clintonville, 

Ohio 




VIC DAMONE 


Popular vocal 


15 


mill. 


3 


Cook Motor-. WONW, ^,rk. Pa. 

P. W. Pluinlei Lumber < .... \\1\(. Win- 

ehester, Va. 




MINDY CARSON 


Popular voeal 




min. 


.'i 


Winston-Salem Bldg. & Loan Assn., \\-»|s. 

W .n.t.m-Saleiii. V I . 
ThyoVals (vitamins), KXOA. Sacramento, 

Cajif. 


CAPITOL 
RECORDS 


FRANK DeVOL PRESENTS 


Pop-eoneert with 
top stars 


30 


in i n . 


5 


( Sp<»n -or li-t ii «»i available) 


Sunset & Vine Sts. 


JAN c won i; SHOW 


Smooth, daneeahle 


15 


min. 


5 




Hollywood, i ,1 




inusie, voeals 












SKITCH HENDERSON 


Melodic Bketckea 


30 


min. 


1 





*These may vary from station to station as library shfl 



flexible as to length and broadcast scheduler \Ch(ll't COIltitlUed OTl J)Og€ 68} 




Joseph If. Mien, atl manager. Bristol-Myers: 

ii We believe you must use radio and television as sup- 
plementary media if you expect to do a decent, national 
job. Also, we believe it'd be poor business practice to buy 
into J I at the expense oj radio. Out \ H(. radio show. 
'Mr District Ittorney' (above!, is a money-maker for z/s." 




Douglas Baffin, radio head. Whitehall Co.: 

ki The 'Small Fry' TV show (above) has done well for other 
sponsors, but was not very successful in our case. For 
our low-cost drug items, we need a mass coverage in our 
broadcast media. We believe radio is the most effective 
vehicle for reaching the people who buy our products." 




Spokesman for the IS T. Babbitt Company: 

"Babbitt dropped the 'Nona From Nowhere' soap opera 
(above) and 'David Harum' radio show to adopt different 
techniques and different vehicles. It will now bankroll a 
half-hour II drama: also radio news reports on Mutual, 
in order to capitalize on the interest in Korean war news." 




Spokesman for the Cities Service Company: 

ii Cities Service has been in radio for 26 years. It's always 
had happy results with radio's full market coverage. But 
when we experimented with 'The Band of America' (above) 
for a 13-week simulcast, it became clear that TV's cover- 
age was restricted. We'd like to see a wider TV market." 



They're coming 
back to radio 

Sponsors assume more realistic 
attitude toward use of both TV 

and radio as war clouds loom 




G. Wm. Anderson, Jr.. Spc»ief<»f Watch Band 

account executive at Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles: 
"Speidel left radio in 1949 to sponsor the NBC-TV show, 
'What's My Name' (above). // the war pressure keeps on, 
Speidel may have to leave television on a network basis 
and convert to a combination of both radio and television." 



< 



With a global war hovering 
over their shoulders, na- 
tional advertisers are wearing a new 
look as they face radio/TV time-buy- 
ing in 1951. 

It's not a grim look. 

Nor is it a cheerful look. 

It's simply a facing-the-facts, more 
realistic look. 

National admen, according to an ex- 
tensive survey just completed by spon- 
sor, feel that the appraisal of radio 
and TV now is cooler, more level- 
headed. Attitudes toward radio are re- 
turning to normalcy. 

No longer is TV regarded as an 
alluring new glamour doll and radio 
an old-fashioned country cousin, with 
one to be wooed over the other. Nor 
do the admen feel impelled to rob AM 
Peter to pay TV Paul. The survey in- 
dicates that both media will flourish 
in the new year, each to be weighed 
objectively according to its individual 
merits. 

What's responsible for this change 
in attitude among admen? To under- 
stand the trend, it's necessary to ex- 
amine what caused the sometimes fren- 
zied rush into TV in the first place. 
1 he factors included : 

1. Many big-city dwelling sponsors, 
excited by the presence of a TV set in 
their own homes, felt that every other 
citizen in the U.S.A. must feel the 
same way. They tended to forget 
radio's coverage picture over the entire 
country. 

2. The sponsor felt he was "in show 
business" when he bankrolled a visual 
TV production. It was like being a 
Hollywood or Broadway producer — 
something to boast about to your 
neighbor. 

3. Caught up in the "Madison Ave- 
nue fever," the admen thought only in 
terms of impressing retailers in big 
cities, while neglecting those in non-TV 
areas. 

4. A few advertising agencies urged 
their clients to rush into TV unduly, 
so that the agency itself could experi- 
ment to find out what the new medium 
was all about. 

5. Many a sponsor's first concern — 
an unwise one at times — was to snatch 
up a franchise on the best available 
TV evening time. 

This rashness opened up a Pandora "s 
Box of troubles for some advertisers. 
The current reasons for sponsors to 
simmer down emotionally I with ex- 
amples aplenty to follow ) can be sum- 
marized in this fashion: 



1. An increasing number of admen 
now realize it's foolish to think of a 
tug-of-war between the two media for 
supremacy in the advertising budget 
structure. Radio and TV can be used 
to supplement and complement each 
other — like magazines or newspapers 
— not as opposing media. 

2. Admen have begun to think more 
in terms of the specific exploitation 
needs of their product, rather than of 
just buying into TV in order to keep 
up with the Joneses. 

3. They're learning a lesson from the 
doleful experiences of fellow sponsors, 
who abandoned radio for TV, got their 
fingers burned for various reasons, and 
now are returning to radio or expand- 



timebuyers and account executives 
queried by sponsor, expressed full con- 
fid( nee in radio's proven pulling 
power. "'It would be sill) to sell radio 
short at this time — just as it would be 
unwise to pit TV against AM," was 
the most commonly expressed senti- 
ment. 

In the great majority of cases, ad- 
men spoke of TV and radio as media 
which could work in tandem harmoni- 
ously. And, in fact, not only arc spon- 
sors not cutting into their radio bud- 
gets to spend on TV; but most national 
advertisers plan to increase their radio 
budgets in 1951. (Many of them, of 
course, will increase their TV budgets 
a3 well, bringing fresh business to the 




Lucky Strike's Jack Benny shows, both on radio and television, reflect twin media use 



ing budgets to include both radio and 
TV. 

4. They're aware that skyrocketing 
costs of TV compare unfavorably, in 
ratio, with radio costs. 

5. They're taking into account the 
fact that video's potential audience 
(9,000,000 TV homes) does not neces- 
sarily infringe upon radio's audience 
(41,000,000 radio homes). 

6. Finally, and perhaps most impor- 
tantly, the gloomy Korean situation, 
with the consequent impending war 
economy, has compelled all sponsors to 
evaluate both radio and TV advertis- 
ing in a changed, more sober light. 

With only one exception, all of the 
three dozen advertising managers, 



nation's near-sold-right-out video sta- 
tions.) 

Here are just a few examples of 
major advertisers who are spending 
new money for radio and TV on a bal- 
anced basis: 

Harvey M. Bond, advertising direc- 
tor for Benrus Watch Company, said 
the firm's radio/TV allocation will be 
upped 30% in 1951. This will mean 
a total outlay of about $2,000,000— 
largely for radio and TV announce- 
ments and for part of the Saturday 
Show Of Shows on NBC-TV. "Radio 
built Benrus," added Benrus' account 
executive, Len Tarcher, of J. D. I ar- 
cher & Company. "We would hardly 
(Please turn to page 58) 



15 JANUARY 1951 



35 



ALL WE ASK IS 



WHAT YA GOI 




RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

MONOGRAM BUILDING N ASH V I LLE 3 , T EN N ESS EE 
TELEPHONE 4-175 1 




SELL? 



The Brown Brothers build radio programs! We build 'em to sell merchandise. For 
more than ten years our programs have produced results. But, don't take our word for 
it. Ask 



The Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis 

Morton Salt and Klau-Van Pietersom-Dunlap 

Robin Hood Flour and H. W. Kastor & Sons 

Aunt Jemima Corn Meal and Needham, Louis & Brorby 

Jax Beer and Fitzgerald Advertising Agency 

You got something to sell? We'd like to talk it over with you. 

Charley and Bill Brown 



OPEN END TRANSCRIPTIONS DISTRIBUTED BY 

MONOGRAM RADIO PROGRAMS 

75 E.WACKER DRIVE, CHICAGO • NASHVILLE 



A SPO\SOR routidtip 



Bar candy 



on the air 




Mars 1950: Firm dropped "Falstaff's Fables," cut "Howdy Doody," to buy 



Leaders turn to advertising, with emphasis on radio/TV, 

as cost increases cut profit margin. Mars is top spender 



Candy manufacturers wish 
that n sweet tooth were the 
only thing that took a bite out of their 
candy bar. Mounting costs, decreased 
consumption, and stiff competition 
within the industry have made the 
going rough. To maintain their sales 
volume ($986,000,000 wholesale 1949) 
candy bar makers are advertising heav- 
ily, and use of the air media in partic- 
ular is spiraling. Leaders like Mars, 
Peter Paul, Walter F. Johnson and 
Williamson are devoting major shares 
of their advertising budgets to radio 
and TV, and, sponsor found in a re- 



cent survey of the industry, smaller 
manufacturers are following suit. 

Radio is a natural medium for candy 
bar manufacturers, industry elders say, 
because sales are mass and based on 
impulse buying. It's a matter of cre- 
ating product preference; of getting 
the customer to walk into the store and 
ask for his favorite brand — whether it's 
in sight or not. Low-cost advertising 
makes it possible to drum home brand 
names. 

Biggest air user now among candy 
companies is Mars which recently 
signed a $2,500,000 contract with 



ABC. While many of its competitors 
have moved into TV, Mars has just be- 
gun a concentrated campaign on radio. 
Whether on radio or TV, most large 
candy manufacturers air their plugs 
over network rather than spot-radio. 

Mars has no arbitrarily set advertis- 
ing budget. Expenditures are made on 
the basis of cartons of candy sold. For 
1949, it's reported that Mars sold over 
$50,000,000 worth of Mars bars, Milky 
ways, and Snickers. About $1,500,000 
went for network radio and $38,000 
for network TV. This past year, radio 
and TV, comprising most of the ad 





PETER PAUL TRIED TELEVISION LAST YEAR, IS NOW BACK COMPLETELY TO RADIO, USES LOCAL NEWSCASTS EXTENSIVELY 

38 SPONSOR 



— 



- — 



<J 



V 



1 



•V- 



<X«ft<r» 



i 



? 



/v 






MARS 1951: FIRM NOW SPONSORS FOUR ABC SHOWS WEEKLY, INCLUDING "INNER SANCTUM" (ABOVE). TOTAL COST $2,500,000 



budget, should reach $3,000,000. 

The company's contract with ABC, 
one of the largest purchases in night- 
time radio ever made, calls for three 
half-hour periods and one 15-minute 
period on four successive nights over 
the coast-to-coast network. The Mars 
"operation quartet" began 31 Decem- 
ber. It comprises the third segment 
of Stop The Music, Sunday, 7:30 to 
7:45 p.m., CST; Inner Sanctum, Mon- 
day, 7:00 to 7:30 p.m., CST; Can You 
Top This, Tuesday, 7:00 to 7:30 p.m., 
CST; and Bob Barkley, American 



Agent, Wednesday, 7:00 to 7:30 p.m. 
Mars and its agency, Leo Burnett of 
Chicago, considered the following fa- 
vorable factors before going into 
"operation quartet": (1) Past experi- 
ence. Radio had proved itself to Mars, 
played a major part in building Mars 
business (the whole country echoed it 
one time with jokes about "I've got a 
lady in the balcony," the Dr. I. Q. re- 
frain). (2) Wide circulation. Different 
shows on different nights give Mars a 
varying audience, wider circulation. 
(3) Flexibility. Mars can change com- 



mercials from one thow to another, can 
billboard one show through another. 
(4) Ready-made audience. The shows 
already have large established audi- 
ences. (5) Prime times. All shows are 
bioadcast at top evening times. (6) 
frequency. The multiple show idea 
results in continuity, impact, and un- 
limited merchandising possibilities. 

Mars' recent ABC show, FalstafTs 

Fables, a five-minute broadcast five 

nights a week that cost the company 

about $4,500, has been dropped. The 

(Please turn to page 54) 




'IOOO 

reward 



AFTERNOON 




OFFERED EVERY SUNDAY 




listen to 

RUE DETECTIVE 
YSTERIES 

I MUTUAL rr ATOMS ... WO*U>* UUtOOT 
MTfWOUt _i— , 

to 




Williamson has had "True Detective Mysteries" on Mutual for five years, recently renewed Williamson merchandising pieces stress reward 



15 JANUARY 1951 



39 



DANCE TICKETS 



SPONSOR: Norway Grange ACENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY ; Even top-notch "name'' 
bands didn't attract the croud to a weekly square dance at 
Norway Grange. Only a jeiv couples tinned up the fir it 
three weeks of the event. Norway Grange turned to radio. 
A weekly announcement, costing ST. 60, on an early morn- 
ing farm show worked wonders. With their air commer- 
cial on the day of the dance, Norway Grange reports the 
dance floor crowded weekly, with folks being turned away. 

WIBX. Utica PROGRAM: Ed Slusarczyk's 

Farm & Home Show 



RADIO 
ULTS 




HOUSHOLD CHEMICALS 



SPONSOR: Western Chemicals Co AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor wanted to ob- 
tain a prospect list for its chemical products. To gain new 
customers, they offered a free booklet on the construction, 
care, and cleaning of septic tanks. The offer was made on 
the Saturday Farm Revue, an early morning participation 
program. Four one-minute announcements for $96 re- 
sulted in 373 responses. For approximately 25c per re- 
spondent, the company was furnished with sales leads. 

KNBC, San Francisco PROGRAM: Saturday Farm Revul 



CAR POLISH 



SPONSOR: Plasticize AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This firm started in Miami 
without any dealers or distributors. Their radio plans 
called for a singing commercial to be used on a saturation 
basis on several talent programs. The investment amount- 
ed to $720 monthly plus $85 weekly for a special quarter- 
hour. Within 30 days, over 300 dealers were featuring 
the car polish product. And, in 70 davs, Plasticize topped 
the local market in sales of this product-type. 

WMIE, Miami PROGRAM: Participation on 

various shows 



TALKING DOLLS 



SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck & Co 



AGENCY: Mayers Co 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A $35 participation was 
tried on Barefoot Society (Russ MulhoUand), an early 
morning disk jockey program. The firm offered a talk- 
ing doll for $24.95, and 45 inquiries were traceable to the 
show {a potential gross of $1,122.75). A further check 
of radio's effectiveness by the sponsor showed Sears, Roe- 
buck sold more of these dolls to date than Marshall Field 
in Chicago or Macy's in New York. 
KMPC, Los Angles PROGRAM: Barefoot Society 



WEDDING GOWNS 



SPONSOR: The Aquila AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This exclusive women s 
ready-to-wear store wanted to push their large stock of 
demi-tasse wedding gowns and bridesmaid dresses. Two 
announcements, scheduled on Polly The Shopper, cost 
$50. The commercials on this morning participation show 
brought immediate results. Twenty complete wedding en- 
sembles, bridal and attendant's gowns, were sold for a 
several thousand dollar gross. More dresses were ordered. 

KOIL, Omaha PROGRAM: Polly The Shopper 



FURNITURE 



SPONSOR: Rosenman's Ltd AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For one week, Rosenmans 
advertised furniture on their Late Night Sport Report, a 
\r>-minute show. Approximate cost was $13.20 per broad- 
cast. The same continuity was used throughout the week 
anil the store sold 14 bedroom suites and four Chester- 
field suites. For a seven-day expenditure of $92.40, the 
gross return amounted to $1,753. The advertiser traces 
nil sales In his broadcast advertising. 

CKX, Brandon. Manitoba PROGRAM: Late Nighl Spoil 

Report 



USED CARS 



SPONSOR: Lou Meliska Motors AGENCY: Stern-Warren 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This G. M. Pontiac dealer 
made his entry into radio with 15 minutes of morning 
sponsorship and 15 minutes in the afternoon. The format: 
a show featuring Bill Gordon. The cost: approximately 
$144 for the half-hour. After his initial two weeks of air 
advertising, Meliska sold 25 used cars. Figuring a mod- 
erate $500 per car sale, the gross return from his air ad- 
vertising amounted to $12,500. 
WHK, Cleveland -.•-••- PROGRAM: Bill Gordon Show 



'gotf- 




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l/Defil 



<fy&(Wf 



4M<t 



1Ua«t\.. 



ROSS MULHOLLAND 



tttdf f 



FSuccess? YES!! 



p 








The New Market Basket for 
over 5,000,000 people .... 
MON. thru FRI. 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. 

ROSS MULHOLLAND'S 

"^>G/ie£o6t Society 

COVERING 



Sds 







L-L 



"T^oVssoup 

BIRDSEYE . • ' oODS , INC. 

AMERICAN T.V^ ra;iv| 

RCA • ' SAN o„a . • IPANA 
STREET * SW1TH PU». eNing pQST 

MOTOROLA... S A - w|5S|ON .pAK 
S TUDEBAKER • ■ ^______^- 



rfm&UcaL JJand ^atae&t 7%ai&et 



C/fte Jfiediti (^Jmzfelt (^?zdefimd^ 






DIAL 
710 



GEORGE A. RICHARDS 

Chairman of the Board 



50,000 WATTS 10,000 NIGHT 

LOS ANGELES 

ROBERT O. REYNOLDS 
Vice President & Gen. Mgr. 



JOHN PATT 
President 



H-R REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



What is being done to improve TV newscasts? 



Roland A. Casey 



General sales manager 
Arnold Bakers Inc. 
Port Chester, N. Y. 




Mr. Engels 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Casey 

Being an inde- 
pendent television 
station — and be- 
ing owned by one 
of the country's 
great newspapers. 
the New York 
News— WPIX de- 
votes a large pari 
of its regular 
program schedule 
to TV newscasts. 
However, we have not yet developed 
what might be called a "perfect formu- 
la"' for television news programs and 
we, and I'm sure others, are still ex- 
perimenting to find the right balance 
between visual and audio, film and 
live, stills and newsreels. 

We have, of course, learned many 
lessons — some the hard way. From ex- 
perience, from ratings, from critical 
reaction and from audience mail we 
are constantly proving new ways and 
methods of telecasting news. 

For instance, when we first went on 
the air in mid- 1948, we tried to build 
our news periods mainly around "pure 
news" and attempted to play down the 
personality and appeal of the news- 
caster. This was not a success, some- 
what to our surprise. Since then, by 
running through every conceivable va- 
riation — from a straight, entirely-on- 
filni news show with an anonymous 
commentator to a completely-live "per- 
sonality" newscast — we have learned a 
major lesson. 

This is it: ihc television audience 



looks upon newscasting as a regular 
type of program fare, and news shows 
must have the same "box office" ap- 
peal as other TV shows to be a hit. 

We at WPIX have put this lesson to 
work in improving our newscasts — 
and we have at least 10 regularly- 
scheduled news shows per day — by fea- 
turing and promoting the newscasters 
as performers. Typical examples at 
WPIX would be Ed Thorgesen ( fa- 
mous Fox Movietone commentator who 
does the nightly Televiews show for 
Socony-Vacuum and Monarch Wines), 
and John Tillman ( who does the twice- 
nightly Telepix Newsreel for Consoli- 
dated Edison, and Tomorrow's News 
for Vim Stores). 

From the advertiser's standpoint, we 
are developing commercials, and work- 
ing with agencies in developing com- 
mercial techniques that are "matched" 
to the style of the news shows. By this, 
I dont mean an integrated commer- 
cial that is presented without a percep- 
tible break as pseudo-news. I do mean 
commercials that are identifiable as 
such, although done with the same 
mood and pace as the news show, and 
preferably with a change of voice from 
the regular newscaster in a full 15-min- 
ute news program. 

Of course, we haven't ignored the 
other visual elements of a good news- 
cast in our video presentations. We 
now have our own self-contained news- 
reel crews and film laboratory, plus 
newsreel footage obtained from such 
regular sources as Telenews, plus a 
"swap" deal with KTTV in Los An- 
geles. We also use animated maps, 
slides, still pictures, diagrams, and 
other visual aids, as well as tricky 
camera work and engineering effects. 

One thing that is raising the whole 
level of audience interest in TV news 



— apart from the tenseness of the world 
situation — is the fact that a good lo- 
cal TV newscast will outpull a network 
TV newscast. This is no secret, and 
more and more stations are develop- 
ing their own news shows, building 
news staffs, and exchanging films and 
ideas. 

In the not-so-distant future, there 
will probably be a well-functioning or- 
ganization of TV news editors around 
the country that will act as an advisor 
to TV stations wishing to build news 
programing schedules, and a clearing 
house for ideas and commercial tech- 
niques. 

I believe firmly that TV newscasts 
are now, and will continue to be, an 
important part of commercial telecast- 
ing, as well as useful selling vehicles 
to the television advertiser and his 
agency. 

Walter D. Encels 

Director of News 

WPIX 

New York 

It seems to me 
that there has 
been too much 
worry about mak- 
ing a so-called 
"television type" 
newscast. The 
primary function 
of a newscast is 
to give the news, 
and give it quick- 
ly, clearly and 
timely. It does not seem to me that the 
public demands that newscasts be of 
the type developed by the newsreels. 
In trying to come close to this, the net- 
works have spent much money need- 
lessly in my opinion. 




Mr. Foley 



42 



SPONSOR 



^ 



A more realistic approach seems to 
be shorter news periods, and perhaps 
more frequently presented. This seems 
to be the trend. The nightly news finals 
with a good straightforward presenta- 
tion of the headlines, by an announcer 
who looks and sounds as if he knows 
what he is talking about, and with per- 
haps a few pictures on film or live if 
they are availahle and timely, is as 
good a news show as you need. And 
is about all that the public wants. News 
of itself is perhaps the most interesting 
material on television today. There is 
little need of overdressing it for audi- 
ence interest. 

The weekly news reviews are per- 
haps the m«st interesting aspect of 
news telecasting. Here is the opportu- 
nity for real production. All networks 
are trying to solve this problem. Since 
they are not quite spot newscasts they 
are not as interesting per se. They 
have to do the interpretative kind of 
a job the Sunday magazine sections do, 
with pictures. Since networks do not 
have the budgets to do films especially 
for these shows, good editing must 
take the place. And some good shows 
have been turned out. although without 
much regularity. 

Another very valuable lesson tele- 
casters have learned is that the so- 
called "news names" are not necessar- 
ily good newscasters for television. The 
rise of new faces on television news- 
casting has been healthy. The same 
requirements for announcing on tele- 
vision apply to newscasting: the news- 
caster must have a likeable personality. 
By like token some of the newer per- 
sonalities seem to feel that they have 
to become performers, and are con- 
sciously trying to overemphasize their 
contributions and make themselves 
more important than the news — which 
lessens the impact and interest in the 
show. Keeping a proper balance re- 
quires good direction. 

There will probably be more sponsor 
interest in newscasts from now on. 
Keeping proper commercial balance on 
newscasts can also help improve their 
quality. With news as serious as it is, 
advertisers who wish to use newscasts 
for their advertising messages must be 
careful not to make them overly com- 
mercial which some have done to date. 

George F. Foley Jr. 
President 

Foley and Gorden Inc. 
New York 
{Please turn to page 57) 







95th MARKET IN 
THE UNITED STATES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, capital city 
of Alabama, is the hub of one of the na- 
tion's top markets; the South's most pro- 
gressive industrial and agricultural center. 

TRADING AREA POPULATION 
OF OVER 600,000 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, whose city 
population alone totals 107,000, dominates 
the rich surrounding trading area of 1 1 ex- 
panding counties. 

$133,890,000 
CITY RETAIL SALES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, had city 
retail sales in 1950 that were $5,000,000 
above those of the previous year; proof 
that this market is the "fastest growing 
area in the South." 



Write, Wire or Phone for Availabilities! 



NBC 

WSFA 

Represented by 
Headley-Reed Co. 



MUTUAL 

WJJJ 

Represented by 
Weed & Co. 



MONTGOMERY 
NETWORK 
STATIONS 

ASSOCIATION 



CBS 

wcov 

Represented by 
The Taylor Co. 

ABC 

WAPX 

Represented by 
The Walker Co. 



15 JANUARY 1951 



43 



p^ 



SELL 
WRA/l 




You'll get a BIGGER SHARE of 
the Outstanding Richmond Market 
in 1951 . . . with WRNL. WRNL 
gives you complete coverage in this 
Industrially Progressive, Agricultu- 
rally Rich, Economically Sound trad- 
ing area. WRNL has been on 910 
KC at 5000 watts for more than 10 
years ... so the important buying 
audience has the listening habit. 

Ready Buying 
Power Plus WRNL 

Equals 

More Sales Than 

Ever! 




5000 WATTS 910 KC 
NON-DIRECTIONAL 

(daytime) 
ABC AFFILIATE \ 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA ' 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports or 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



Ratiio and "Ida Red" 3 dish aid gas range sales 



Fifty thousand sales prospects were 
radio's Christmas gift to the Western 
Stove Company. 

This Culver City firm manufactures 
Western-Holly gas ranges and airs the 
Zeke Manners Show on 11 ABC Pa- 
cific Coast stations. The well-known 
musician, song writer, and recording 
artist broadcasts Monday to Friday. 
7:40-7:55 a.m. 



Wf«« 5lfIIOi, " i 

llllRSSHOf 

Y Jf6tetn&r//y jj 
"^M^-SIOimroFft 



EDWARD RETRY & CO.. INC. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



Posters helped bring in some 50,000 prospects 

Since Zeke's records had sold to the 
tune of 20,000,000 in the past five 
years, the sponsor thought a Zeke Man- 
ners recording as a gift would make an 
ideal promotion. 

An old public domain song, "Ida 
Red/' was chosen. Then they had Zeke 
inject a few square dance calls, added 
just a pinch of "Western-Holly." 

"Swing again that pretty little Dol- 



lv. swing her on a Western-Holly," was 
considered not too commercial to be 
objectionable. The recording includ- 
ed another talented entertainer, pretty 
Les Paul. 

The finished gift was an eight-and-a- 
half inch disk in three colors on shel- 
lacked Bristol board with a caricature 
of Zeke Manners on the front. Three- 
color promotional pieces were attached 
to "Western-Holly" gas ranges. They 
featured a life-size picture of Santa 
Claus holding up the free record with 
a photograph of Zeke Manners super- 
imposed over Santa's face. Dealers 
purchased quantities of the records at 
a nominal price and were asked to give 
them to their customers free of charge. 

The promotion was kicked off by 
Zeke Manners himself. He played "Ida 
Red" on his own show and urged lis- 
teners to drop into their nearest West- 
ern-Holly dealer's store for their 
Christmas gift. 

ABC affiliates played the record on 
local disk jockey shows, and two daily 
announcements plugged the offer on 
KECA. Los Angeles, and KGO, San 
Francisco. 

Radios box score to date: 50,000 
sales prospects, and pleased Western- 
Holly dealers who have reordered the 
gift disk, "Ida Red." * * * 



Tire eompany elieks with road report program 



Advertisers who don't think they can 
find a program suitable to their prod- 
uct can just read this and ponder 
awhile. For, on WABI, Bangor, the 
Bangor Tire Company has ideally com- 
bined public service with its commer- 
cial message into a five-minute show 
that's winning friends and influencing 
sales — to say nothing of cutting down 
on highway accidents. 

Their program, Highway Lowdown, 
provides exclusive information from 
the Maine State Police who send three 
daily telegrams to the radio station. 



Then, on three shows daily, six days 
a week, the Bangor Tire Company 
gives their listeners and customers the 
contents of these telegrams. It includes 
prevailing conditions on all major 
roads and routes throughout the state 
I depth of snow, ice and mud). 

Deftly-woven commercials are also 
interchangeable, depending upon the 
product advertised. A typical commer- 
cial: "Drive the Highway Safe — Drive 
the Highway Safer — With Tires (and/ 
or service, and/or accessories) from 
the Bangor Tire Company." * * * 



44 



SPONSOR 



iVeti? shortening uses radio TV sales mixture 

There are as many brands of short- 
ening as there are recipes and winning 



product-acceptance is a tough job. The 
Reliable Packing Compam in Chicago 
did this by blending radio and TV . 

The company's product. Realite, 
used two participations daily on the 
WJJD. Chicago show, Simon Speaks, 




Home economist show features Realite recipes 

with Ernie Simon. After several weeks 
of product announcement. Realite 
swung to a recipe folder offer. Along 
with the recipe folder. Reliable Packing 



mailed a letter <d thanks and a 1 >■ 
< mipon toward a purchase of Realite. 

The next phase was the tying in of 
Realite with local dealers all over the 
city. The name of a different lew al 
grocer was read daily and the listener 
urged to go to that particular store for 
her Realite purchase. The total radio 
expenditure: about S200 per week. 

Realite also used a participation on 
the Beulah Karney Show via WENR- 
TV, ABC station in Chicago. Miss 
Karney. one of Chicago's outstanding 
home economists, prepared her baking 
and cooking recipes with Realite. I \ 
expenditure was about S150. 

The results of the $350 weekly ex- 
penditure have been quicklj noticeable. 
\\ ithin a period of two months. Realit" 
went from 12th place to 7th place in 
shortening sales, according to the Chi- 
cago Tribune Consumer Panel Report 
for shortening. * * * 



Fire sponsors confess: they lore their show 



Usually when a sponsor makes de- 
mands upon a station the broadcast 
executives squirm. Not so with an ul- 
timatum delivered by five advertisers 
to CKCW in Moncton, New Brunswick. 

". . . we as a group want this type 
of program (Christmas Jackpot) re- 
served for this group's first refusal at 
any time and the idea should not be 
transferred to another group without 
our consent." 

The above was an excerpt from a 
letter written by the bankrollers of the 
daily half-hour show. The format of 
Christmas Jackpot required listeners to 
visit the sponsors' stores in search of 
a "jackpot" item which changed daily. 
Each morning during the half-hour of 
Christmas music and chatter, phone 
calls were made at random. For each 
item named, the listener received a gift 
from the particular sponsor. A '"jack- 
pot" prize of $100 and five merchan- 
dise gifts was the award if all five 
items were correctly named. 

I he sponsors report the follow ing 
results which prompted their ultima- 
tum: store traffic greater than in any 
previous period with most people buy- 
ing. The general manager of Monc- 
ton's largest hardware store says his 
store traffic was several hundred people 
greater than at a Grand Opening sale. 

The only "complaint" came from an 
advertiser new to radio. On being: 



swamped b\ customers for several days 
he asked who was going to pay for the 
extra help he needed. * * * 

Briefly . . . 



T 








A warm note of hope and optimism 
for the future came with this holiday 
greeting sent to sponsor by the Joseph 
Katzes. 

«• * *• 

Ed Sullivan, m.c. of Toast of the 
Town on CBS-TV, is also appearing on 
windshield stickers. It's all part of a 
new advertising tie-in for Lincoln-Mer- 
cury dealers, sponsor of the show. 
Used cars in dealers' lots carry the em- 
blem noting the car is in good condi- 
tion and reads: "Ed Sullivan's Toast 
of the Town Safe Buy Used Car." 




54.7% 

Of Oklahoma 

Factory Workers 

Blanketed ONLY 

BY KVOO 



In the concentrated Tulsa Market (34.8% 
of Oklahoma's Land Area) are 46.8% 
of Oklahoma's manufacturing plants 
employing 54.7% of Oklahoma's fac- 
tory workers. These workers are paid 
58.5% of total wages earned by all of 
the industrial workers in the state. 

These are Pre-Korea Dept. of Commerce 
figures. With defense contracts pouring 
into these plants, the number of work- 
ers and their already great buying power 
is INCREASING, making the No. 1 
Oklahoma Market even BETTER! 

ONLY KVOO blankets this market, 

in addition to bonus coverage of 

rich counties in Missouri, Kansas 

and Arkansas. 

Edward Petry 8C Co. Inc. 

National Representatives 

NBC AFFILIATE 
50,000 Watts 




BLANKETS OKLAHOMA'S 
NO. 1 MARKET 



15 JANUARY 1951 



45 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

(Continued from page 6) 

Fortune smiled on Weber for a long 
time. Even opera briefly flourished, 
under the competitive prod of Oscar 
Hammerstein. Vaudeville circuits mul- 
tiplied. Some theatres ran all day and 
into the late evening, requiring two 
separate orchestras. Burlesque, then 
snapping rather than removing its gar- 
ters, toured perhaps 150 units a sea- 
son. Weber saw the great tea dansant 
craze rise and spread in the time of 
Irene and Vernon Castle. The vogues 



of ragtime and jazz and fox trot and 
Charleston all helped music. So did 
the introduction, about 1911, of 
French-type cabarets. Then came the 
gingerbread movie palaces which 
popped the eyes of the multitude by 
bringing up 100 musicians on a hy- 
draulic platform. 

* * * 

But at least the show business of the 
sponsors is financially responsible. 
Weber would concede that. Almost 
never does it fail to pay off. It is a 
show business of impeccable credit rat- 
ings, of giant corporate structure, of 



X3 



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A 15-COUNTY MARKET 
With Over 

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Sales 

"Sales Management 1950 Survey of Buying Power 




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scientific linkage to mass distribution, 
of big salaries for the favored few and 
firm 39-week commitments. And the 
union today typically makes a deal 
with a few executives and sets the pat- 
tern for all. A far cry from the young- 
er and tougher Joe Weber who went 
around organizing rabbit-brained mu- 
sicians in hideaway beer gardens. But 
don't get us wrong. We're not weep- 
ing for the good old days. Corpora- 
tions may be less lovable than pictur- 
esque showmen but they are a heck of 
a lot more dependable. * * * 



McCANN-ERICKSON 

[Continued from page 29) 

responsible for both radio/TV and psy- 
chological research. Each associate has 
virtually complete operating responsi- 
bility for his own phase of research. 
Armstrong relies on the four to engi- 
neer the projects assigned to them as 
well as to direct operations; he relies 
on them heavily also to communicate 
the findings to the respective creative, 
program, and account staffs. 

Bill Wallace, market research chief, 
is an expert at machine tabulation and 
coding. In 1940, he joined Young & 
Rubicam to become a research super- 
visor under Gallup. Like Don Arm- 
strong, Wallace switched to McCann- 
Etickson in 1946. 

Wallace is in charge of the many 
market-research projects designed to 
answer specific client problems. He is 
also responsible for McCann's Home- 
maker's Opinion Panel which com- 
prises a representative national sample 
of 6,000 families called upon for mail 
surveys; and he supervises the agency 
staff of several hundred resident inter- 
viewers who can be put to work in a 
couple of hours when personal inter- 
views are needed. 

Russell Schneider tests copy and also 
finds time in the evening to teach ad- 
vertising as a guest lecturer at Colum- 
bia University's School of Business. 
After an initial two years with the J. 
Sterling Getchell Advertising Agency 
as a researcher, Russ Schneider joined 
McCann-Erickson in 1940, has been 
there since except for time spent in 
service. Major portion of his work is 
in printed media where the emphasis 
is twofold : appraisal of audience at- 
traction; and conviction or believabil- 
ity. 

Stanley Canter is the newcomer to 
McCann's top research group. For the 



46 



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SELLING The Stars Sing to the Huenefeld 
Furniture Company of Bryan and Defiance, 
Ohio, are Glenn R. Thayer, general manager 
of WONW. Walter Bates, APS field repre- 
sentative who is describing the merits of the 
series, and Gene Miller, commercial manager 
of the station. Seated is Beulah Jaquith of 
Huenefeld Furniture, with Roy Huenefeld 
looking over her shoulder. 




SIGNING the contract for The Stars Sing, 
plus a set of promotional announcements, is 
Roy Huenefeld of the Huenefeld Furniture 
Company. Watching, from left to right, 
are Gene Miller and Glenn Thayer of WONW, 
APS Field Representative Walter Bates, 
and Beulah Jaquith of Huenefeld's. 



. . . because an APS salesman helped 
the station SELL 

Here's still another example of how personalized Associated Program 
Service gives subscribers a "Library that Pays for Itself"! The case of 
WONW, Defiance, Ohio, is typical. APS Field Representative Walter 
Bates recently visited Defiance, to work with WONW's sales staff in 
selling one of the top APS programs, The Stars Sing, featuring radio's 
greatest singing talent. 

With the WONW salesmen, he called on local prospects, backing up the 
station's own efforts. Together, they signed the Huenefeld Furniture Com- 
pany of Bryan and Defiance — not only for The Stars Sing but also a series 
of spots to promote the series. 

(In addition to this profitable sale, the WONW-APS sales team also found 
a sponsor for a set of pre-Christmas jingles selected from the wide assort- 
ment of special material in the extensive APS library. Total revenue: 
$2,800 — or more than enough to pay WONWs subscription to the Asso- 
ciated Library for the entire year.) 

The greatest proof of any binary service's value is whether it pays for 
itself And the APS Library does... again and again, all over the country. 
Under the APS service plan, APS field representatives visit your station 
when you first subscribe, working as aggressively with your sales staff 
as they did with WONW's. Six months later, there's another call to offer 
further assistance — and, after that, you can count on regular visits at 
least once a year. 

Associated Program Service 

is giving stations what they want ! 

And that's SALES SERVICE . . . sincere on-the-spot sales help . . . tran- 
scribed money-making sales meetings each month . . . regional sales and 
programming clinics (watch for the schedule of dates soon). ..monthly 
bulletins, memos, newsletters ... harder-selling sales presentations. 

It's all yours — if you're an APS subscriber. And a few more stations still 
can be. Send in the coupon and find out how little it costs for so much. 



® 



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"the library that pays for itself 9 



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Associated Program Service 
151 West 46th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 

Tell me how the Associated library can help build income 
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past four years he's been Dr. Hans 
Zeisel's assistant. During that time he 
acquired an M.A. in mathematical sta- 
tistics at Columbia. 

Wen Hans Zeisel left, Canter was 
doing sales analysis and writing the 
statistical parts of presentation. The 
agency decided to promote Canter in- 
to the media research job to replace 
Dr. Zeisel. an indication of its policy 
of promotion from within. 

Dr. Herta Herzog came originally 
from Vienna where she was assistant 
professor of social psychology and sta- 
tistics at the University of Vienna. Her 
first job in the United States was re- 
search assistant in Columbia Univer- 
sity's Department of Sociology. This 
was followed in 1937 by several years 
as a consultant to E. I. duPont de Ne- 
mours & Company, where she did psy- 
chological studies of consumer prefer- 
ences in fabric designs. Following an 
associate directorship at Columbia's 
Bureau of Radio Research I now Bureau 
of Applied Social Research I which in- 
cluded some war research service with 
the War Department and Office of War 
Information, Dr. Herzog joined Mc- 
Cann Erickson as Radio/TV research 
head. 

One of Dr. Herzog's important tools 
at the agency has been the Stanton- 
Lazarsfeld Program Analyzer. This 
electrical device gathers dozens of audi- 
ence responses simultaneously and then 
records them, giving a single graph 
for a whole group. As many as 80 
"subjects" are invited up to the re- 
search department's testing room on 
the 11th floor. They sit around the 
mom with two small push-buttons in 
their hands, listening to the recording 
of a program. When a particular part 
of the program pleases a listener he 
presses one button marked Like. In 
the other hand is another button 
marked Dislike. Each button push is 
received by the machine through its 
long tentacle-like wires, then duly re- 
corded. At the end of each test the 
machine disnor^es a piece of paper 
with wavy lines on it like the tracings 
on a hospital fever chart. 

The Program Analyzer, familiarly 
dubbed "P.A." by the department, 
earns its keep In helping clients with 
program problems. One McCann- 
Erickson client had carefull) built a 
\it\ successful dramatic program. 

There was still something bothering 
the agencv, however. Explains Dr. 
Herzog: "Questions were raised as to 
whether psychological thrillers, despite 



48 



their general popularitv. would create 
objection and criticism of the sponsor 
among the public. There was some fan 
mail to support this concern, but fan 
mail is known to be a questionable 
measure." 

A two-pronged investigation started 
looking for an answer to this question. 
The agency's Market Research division 
called in several hundred part-time 
field interviewers. They were told to 
survey 650 people in several Midwest 
cities. Questionnaires asked whether 
certain programs ( including the cli- 
ent's show I were being listened to, if 
so, who sponsored them, and was the 
sponsor fulfilling his obligation to the 
public. Detailed questions on the past 
10 programs broadcast by the client 
were included. 

While the field survey yvas going on. 
three tests with the program analyzer 
were arranged in New York. Two ps\ - 
chological thrillers of somewhat differ- 
ent types were tested, along with a 
straight drama. On the "fever chart 
that resulted from these three tests. Di. 
Herzog and her two assistants exam- 
ined the hills and valleys to find the 
specific spots where the program met 
with approval or dislike. 

In summing up the results of these 
two entirely different approaches, Dr. 
Herzog said : "The general results of 
both types of study were in complete 
agreement, indicated virtually no neg- 
ative carry-over to the sponsor from 
psychological thriller programs. In 
fact, regular followers of the program 
considered them a real strength of th< j 
series." 

Following these findings, the client 
continued using psychological thrillers 
with confidence about his listeners' 
actions. The program analyzer indi- 
cated that listeners were not "upset" 
by these programs as long as conflicts 
in the individual story yvere of such 
a kind and in large enough amount to 
make audience identification with them 
unlikely. In addition, the study pro- 
vided guidance in selecting plots for 
future programs. 

The program analyzer was used in 
another instance to test a neyv com- 
mercial. Past studies have shown that 
the effectiveness of a commercial de- 
pends on the program heard with it. 
It also depends on how well accom- 
panying commercials are received. For 
example, a good opening commercial 
passes on some of its "goodwill" to the 
middle and closing one. This works 
backwards too. strangely enough. A 

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49 



good closing commercial causes listen- 
ers to think better of the opening one 
in retrospect. 

For these reasons, Dr. Herzog tested 
the clients new commercial by insert- 
ing it into exactly the same program 
a? the old one. This made the enter- 
tainment phase of the show a fixed 
factor for the test. And the accom- 
panying commercials were also the 
same before and after. Result: for the 
new commercial a 20% increase in the 
test panel's ability to remember sales 
arguments, a 34/^ increase in "favor- 



able product opinion." In this particu- 
lar case, greater liking for the new 
commercial raised the liking level for 
the entertainment to«. Since it became 
the opening commercial, a larger au- 
dience could be counted on to stay 
through the program. 

Though the program analyzer is a 
useful tool it merely supplements other, 
more conventional research techniques 
such as surveys. A recent project, in- 
volving Bill Wallace and the market 
research division, concerned the prob- 
lem of one client's dealer support. His 



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One of America's TEN TOP DAYTIME 
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product is not a frequently purchased 
one, nor is it readily identified by 
brand. To be successful, therefore, 
manufacturers in this business depend 
on dealers rather than on consumers 
for support. The problem: how to 
broaden this dealer support and there- 
by sell more. 

One important fact brought out by a 
widespread survey of dealers was that 
they seemed impressed by a rival 
brand's TV operation. This company's 
television campaign had aroused in- 
terest out of all proportion to the 
brands distribution or the size of its 
ad budget. On the strength of this. 
McCann-Erickson's client bought a TV 
program. Only two weeks after the 
programs baptism, a second study was 
made of dealer reactions. Some 19% 
of the 300 dealers in two markets sur- 
veyed reported product sales directly 
traceable to the TV program. A panel 
of 300 consumers, quizzed both before 
and after the program took the air, 
showed an increase in brand awareness 
of from five to 48% during the same 
several weeks. 

These are some of the specific prob- 
lems the department's researchers have 
wrestled with. Less spectacular, but 
certainly as important, is the continu- 
ing struggle to fit the right media 
schedule to a client's advertising ob- 
jective. Sometimes an ad budget is 
outlined bv the advertiser. The agen- 
cy's problem then is to pick out the 
most efficient combination of radio, 
newspaper, magazine, and TV coverage 
for the money it can spend. At other 
times, the advertiser leaves it up to the 
agency's media research to recommend 
an itemized budget calculated to 
achieve the advertising goals. 

It is the function of media research 
to fit the right media schedule to a cli- 
ent's advertising and marketing objec- 
tives. The media group therefore has a 
job of dual integration. On the one 
hand, it is working closely with the 
other research divisions — market and 
psychological research — to learn the 
characteristics of the most promising 
prospects for the advertising message. 
In the consideration of such factors as 
coverage, audience composition, turn- 
over, duplication, media research 
works closely with the copy and the 
radio/TV research groups. On the oth- 
er hand, the media group works close- 
ly with the space and timebuyers to ar- 
rive at the most efficient selection of 
media for the advertising dollars ex- 
pended. Aside from specific jobs. Stan- 



50 



SPONSOR 



t 



ley Canter's media group keeps track 
of and analyzes the media's own re- 
search studies and disseminates perti- 
nent information within the agency. 

When media presentations come in 
by mail, or a time salesman calls up 
one of the McCann-Erickson time- 
buyers for an appointment, Stanley 
Canter is notified. He sits in with the 
timebuyer and the salesman; this can 
be embarrassing — for the salesman — if 
he isn't sure of his facts. Main com- 
plaint of both Canter and his boss, 
Don Armstrong, is that media don't 
ask around at the agencies first before 
launching an expensive survey. They 
say that many media-inspired research 
reports fail to answer questions they 
want answered and end up filed in the 
wastebasket. 

In laying out a media schedule, the 
main job is to select those radio and 
TV stations, magazines, and news- 
papers that deliver passible customers 
for a product most economically. Mar- 
ket surveys first establish the main 
group of prospects — housewives, chil- 
dren, men. Then each medium is care- 
fully combed as to audience composi- 
tion. Those selected deliver the largest 
unduplicated group of people who will 
buy the client's product. Another con- 
sideration is the product's distribution 
and the client's emphasis on particu- 
lar markets. 

Virtually all advertising research is 
concerned with conscious reaction of 
the public to a product, service, or 
idea. Both Research Director Arm- 
strong and Dr. Herzog are convinced 
that an increasingly important part of 
future agency research must be con- 
cerned with relatively sub-conscious 
motivations. For several years now 
they have been doing spadework in 
this area — relating the findings of 
probing depth interviews to clinical 
personality tests of the same respon- 
dents. When asked about a case his- 
tory or two they demurred, saying that 
all work so far conducted had been of 
a strictly confidential nature. How- 
ever, one indication of the importance 
McCann-Erickson accords this area of 
research is the fact that they are in the 
process of setting up a new division of 
the research department, the entire ef- 
forts of which will be concerned with 
psychological or motivational, re- 
search. 

The pioneering McCann-Erickson re- 
searchers are after the deep-seated, of- 
ten unrecognized reasons for product 
preference. Why does one person go 



4 





j 



y 



/ 



To a 
Sunset 
Boulevard 
Time Buyet 
who commutes 
on the 
Super-Chief 



If you think of Iowa only as a place to pass 
thru or by or over on the way East, please 
consider this: The Super-Chief doesn't dis- 
close it, but no town in Iowa is more than 
12.8 miles from a railroad; only 3 states 
have more railway mileage. Thru high- 
ways don't show it. but there's a surfaced 
road to every incorporated town in Iowa. 

• In per cent of farms with autos. Iowa leads 

the nation. The means exist for lowans to 
reach markets — and Ioiva's $4 billion an- 
nual income constitutes a market worth 
reaching. 

Contrary to Hollywood gag-writers, all 
lowans are not in California. Furthermore, 
those who stay home take off their shoes 
before going to sleep. Their little women 
order furniture moved around, make 
scenes about cigarette ashes, buy mink 
coats, chew gum, and read books. lowans 
also display their normality by listening to 
the radio, with 97.1 % of the families own- 
ing one or more radios. 
Besides transcontinental airplanes, Iowa 
air contains WMT's strong signal. In 
WMTland 600 kc means music hall, stage, 
and news. Information and entertainment 
pour up WMT's masts and come out in the 
minds of more than a million listeners. 
When you buy time on WMT, your client's 
advertising reaches responsive customers 
to whom the station is an important part of 
normal living. 

The Katz Agency man will provide full 
data upon request. 



5000 WATTS, 600 KC 



DAY AND NIGHT 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




15 JANUARY 1951 



51 



&S££l OLD FRIEND 



Renewing year after year, Swift 
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cream through KJR's efficient 
coverage of Western Washington. 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 
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Mr. John Naylor, Jr. 
Gardner Advertising Co. 
St. Louis. Missouri 
Dear Johnny: 

WCHS's home town uv Charleston, 
If est Virginny, 
is th' fifth best 
bizness city in 
th' country! Yes- 
sir, Johnny, I 
seen hit in th' 
papers on th' 
boss's desk t'oth- 
er day. Oney 
Umr towns in 
th' USA showed 
a bigger percent 
uv gain in biz- 
ness over th' 
same nuints in 
1949 — an most 
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seners fer half as math money as 
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try. Keep thet in mind. Johnny! 
Yrs. 
Algy 

WCHS 
Charleston, W. Va. 





NEW ORLEANS' 

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'THE SEPIA STATION 

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three blocks out of his way to buy a 
package of one product when he can 
find a similar product around the cor- 
ner? Part of the answer is that the vol- 
ume of advertising makes the differ- 
ence. But tests with similar products 
have proven that's not the whole an- 
swer. 

The few motivational research proj- 
n ts completed thus far were initiated 
and paid for by the agency. Most of 
their projects, however, are initiated 
either by a client or by one of the 
agency's account executives. First an 
estimate is given by the associate di- 
rector of research directly concerned; 
a program analyzer job, for example, 
would be estimated by Herta Herzog. 
The project is then scheduled, provided 
the cost meets agency and client ap- 
proval. It gets underway when re- 
searchers and facilities are available. 
When all the results are in, the division 
head, (associate director) in charge 
writes up a presentation. Final client 
presentations get careful scrutiny by 
director Donald Armstrong, Jr. 

McCann-Erickson believes firmly in 
a close link-up between research and 
creative talent. The results of research 
studies are immediately passed on at 
regular conferences. On Wednesdays, 
for example, radio writers and re- 
searchers meet to talk over any recent 
developments that might affect com- 
mercials on radio or TV. 

The research story of McCann-Erick- 
son, finally, would be incomplete with- 
out mention of the McCann-Erickson 
library. Delphine Humphrey, the chief 
librarian heading a staff of seven, is 
considered one of the country's out- 
standing advertising agenc) librarians. 
The library, another arm of the Re- 
search Department, permits the agen:y 
to carry its integration policy outside 
the agency. McCann-Erickson research- 
ers pride themselves on knowing the 
research facts collected elsewhere and 
utilize them whenever applicable. Such 
avoidance of unnecessary duplication 
permits the agency to expand its siz- 
able basic research projects by build- 
ing on the facts already collected. 

If there is a single most important 
point to be made about research at Mc- 
Cann-Erickson. it is to re-highlight its 
integral function in McCann-Erickson's 
over-all advertising engineering philos- 
oph) that there should be a complete 
welding of the analytic and the crea- 
tive. Through continuous informal 
dailv personal contact with account and 



52 



SPONSOR 



creative people and meetings, research 
findings are disseminated throughout 
the agency to help the company do its 
job more effectively. * * * 

The above article on McCann-Erick- 
sons Research Department, written 
arid researched by sponsor's staff, is 
the second in a series of stories which 
will take readers inside various adver- 
tising agencies. Letters from readers 
suggesting subjects and commenting on 
the approach used thus far will be wel- 
comed. 



ALKA-SELTZER 

{Continued from page 27) 

Tracing back the Miles radio history 
to discover the proverbial acorn from 
which the great oak grew, takes you 
back to WOWO. Ft. Wayne, Ind. In 
1928, WOWO (close to Elkhart) be- 
came the first radio station to carry 
Miles (then called Dr. Miles Labora- 
tories) advertising on a regular sched- 
ule. Nervine was advertised on a sooth- 
ing vocal-music program for five min- 
utes just preceding the signoff at 10 
p.m. which they called their point of 
highest listening during the evening. 
After the Nervine commercial, the sta- 
tion went off the air with the station 
manager's wife playing "Back Home 
Again in Indiana" on the studio organ. 
Miles products were not pushed on the 
air, regularly until four years later. 
The Wade Agency approached the late 
A. H. Beardsley, who was then presi- 
dent, and his brother, Charles S. 
Beardsley, urging (hem to try Songs of 
Home Sweet Home on WLS, Chicago, 
a half-hour Sunday afternoon show. Al- 
bert Wade, who had once worked for 
the Beardsleys as a foreman in their 
printing plant, was a strong booster of 
the young medium after seeing how 
radio pulled for several other clients. 
One of his major efforts had been 
Murphy's Minstrel Show over WLS for 
the Murphy Products Company, Bur- 
lington, Wis. 

Radio was still an unknown for the 
Beardsleys. Although they were not 
eager to buy the show, they gave a 
friendly ear to their former employee. 
Time and talent for the show was less 
than $400 weekly, not much of a risk, 
the Beardsleys decided. The series was 
launched and druggists in the Chicago 
area were soon selling four times the 
amount of any other area, in ratio to 
the number of dealers. The WLS series 
was followed by a dozen 30-minute 

15 JANUARY 1951 



programs broadcast over a network of 
13 stations on Sunday afternoons. 

This time the advertiser almost 
dropped out of radio. H. S. Thomp- 
son, advertising manager, explained: 

"So we went on the chain; went 
high-hat; kept the same theme but en- 
gaged different talent — more expensive. 
Results — fewer sample requests from 
the entire chain than formerly from 
one station alone." 

That fall, Alka-Seltzer was tried on 
another network with some 13 15-min- 
ute programs again on Sundays. This 



*how The Hoosier Editor, with a rural 
music and variety format was carried 
over 28 stations. The total mail re- 
sponse from either network show had 
not been equal to that of WLS alone. 
"Thirteen weeks and few tangible re- 
sults cured us, we thought, of the radio 
habit,'' Thompson said. * * * 

But within a few months Miles 
was to assume sponsorship of 
what would become its most im- 
portant program, the WLS Nation- 
al Barn Dance. The seeond part of 
this article, to appear in the next 



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53 



issue of SPONSOR will tell how 
Miles eame to buy the Barn 
Dance; how it helped to build 
Alka-Seltzer sales and distribu- 
tion; and how the Barn Dance and 
other rural programing gave way 
to the present Miles programing. 



CANDY ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 39) 

Company has also dropped a Friday 
night segment sponsorship of Howdy 
Doody, NBC. But it will continue to 
buy the 5:45 to 6:00 segment on Mon- 
day nights, and the 5:30 to 5:45 por- 



tion on Wednesday nights. 

Like other candy firms, Mars faces 
a cost squeeze unless the retail lid is 
lifted. This isn't easy. Manufacturers 
of bars account for about 54 f /' of the 
total candy business, and because the 
consumer is more conscious of the 
candy bar price than he is of the boxed 
candy price, he reacts adversely to odd- 
cent upward retail pricings. Many in- 
dustry leaders believe that an honest- 
sized dime bar is the logical answer. 

Mars, using radio heavily to pro- 
mote brand identification, has had 
one dime bar on the market, the Mars 
bar. This has done as well as any of 
the company's five-cent products. Vic- 



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profits. 

Strengthen your sales fences in this 
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WIBW to tell the 1,515,728 Kansas 
farm folks about your products or 
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You'll be digging extra deep into 
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tor H. Gies, vice president in charge 
of sales and advertising, says that the 
company does not favor a six- or 
seven-cent price on bars. 

This point of view coincides with 
the thinking of Peter Paul. Inc., Nauga- 
tuck. Conn. Peter Paul, traditionally 
a radio user since 1937, discontinued 
fi'e-cent candy bar production two 
years ago, priced Mounds and Almond 
Joy at 10c, and has done well with 
them since. The two, competing 
against five-cent bars, have topped the 
field in coconut candy bar sales. Other 
Peter Paul products are Walnettos, 
Coconettos, Choclettos, and Activated 
Charcoal Gum. 

The company reported its highest 
net income during 1948, $3,388,670. 
Last year, it dropped slightly to $3,- 
176.826. Air advertising has cost the 
company some SI. 500.000 a year, a 
large part of tlv ad budget, and has 
helped produce some $35,000,000 an- 
nually in candy business. 

In 1948, Peter Paul had a peak se- 
lective campaign of 390 programs and 
140 announcements aired each week 
over 126 stations. Backbone of this 
air activity was newscasting with a 
local slant so far as possible. 

The company revamped its policy 
earlier this year to concentrate on 
younger age groups. It brought in a 
new advertising director, Elliott Plowe. 
and switched to the Maxon Agency in 
New York. News program coverage 
was reduced to about 70 stations in 
major markets. The company then 
added TV kid shows that included 15 
minutes of Magic Cottage five days a 
week on DuMont: weekly half-hour 
Buck Rogers show over ABC-TV; 
weekly half-hour Hank McCune come- 
dy show over NBC-TV; and See-Saw 
Zoo, a 15-minute puppet show aired 
five days a week on WBAP-TV, Fort 
Worth.' 

Now, the most extensive advertising 
program in its history is slated for 
1951, with radio acting as the spear- 
head and TV dropped completely. The 
company expects to increase the num- 
ber of radio stations to more than 135. 
rn addition of some 45 to the current 
list. 

"About 90' < of our radio budget 
will be used for news programs and 
the remainder for announcements." 
said an executive of the company re- 
vealing the switch back to extensive 
radio news programing. The company 
will sponsor Frank Goss in place of 
Fd Murrow over the Columbia Pacific 



54 



SPONSOR 






. 



Network beginning this month; re- 
mainder of the budget will be spent on 
sponsorship of local programs. Pres- 
ent schedule is for three newscasts per 
week. 

Officials of the company, who said 
that they have decided to step out of 
television for the time being, believe 
that news programs today are the best 
buy in radio. Unlike variety and other 
entertainment programs, they say 
newscasts are least affected by tele- 
vision. 

WBDO, Orlando. Fla.. told SPONSOR 
the company was its steadiest and old- 
est candy advertiser, and that Peter 
Paul promotes its newscast program- 
ing locally. "Peter Paul has sponsored 
our 12:00 to 12:15 p.m. news Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday for years. This 
is our highest-rated daytime show; 
mail pull shows results. 

"A single announcement on seven 
successive Fridays brought in 164 re- 
plies for a Mounds cookie recipe. A 
contest on the noon news three days 
a week pulled 2,627 replies within two 
months. 

"The company prefers to stick with 
the same announcer, newscaster, and 
format, and requests air checks fre- 
quently." 

This is in line with Peter Paul's 
over-all attempt to maintain the closest 
possible cooperation between the com- 
pany and each station. The company 
has two or three people on its payroll 
who do nothing but correspond infor- 
mally with each station. It uses no 
form letters, and the policy has paid 
oft. For example, one station spent 
more money advertising Peter Paul's 
newscast, than the show actually cost 
the company. 

Another large user of radio is the 
Williamson Candy Company, manufac- 
turers of Oh Henry. "Virtually the 
entire promotional expenditure is de- 
voted to radio and TV advertising." 
says Richard Fechheimer of Aubrey, 
Moore & Wallace, Chicago, advertising 
agency for the company. 

Williamson currently sponsors True 
Detective Mysteries on the full MBS 
network of 502 stations. The program 
is broadcast on Sundays from 5:30 to 
6:00 p.m., EST, has almost completed 
five years of plugging for Oh Henry. 
It cost the company an estimated half- 
million dollars last year, is budgeted 
currently at about $13,000 a week. 
Williamson recently renewed its spon- 
sorship for another five years. 

The company began using radio in 

15 JANUARY 1951 




ffli 




IN BUFFALO 



Thanks to the best wave 
length on the dial, WGR's 
5000 watts reaches western 
New York's prosperous 
markets with radio's biggest 
dollar's worth in this area. 
BIGGER COVERAGE 
with top-rated programs . . . 
Columbia and local . . . 
makes WGR the best buy 
in Buffalo. 



COLUMBIA NETWORK 




&roadca*tUig 



RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 

National Representative, Free & Peters, Inc. 
Leo ]. ("YHz") Vitzpatrkk 
I. R. ("\ke") Lounsberry 



55 



Matinee 



Matinee radio listeners in Alabama 
love Maury Farrell. So much so that 
the Pulse gives his "Matinee in Bir- 
mingham" a higher rating than any 
local program on any other Birming- 
ham station all day long.* 



idol 



Idol of Alabama radio for more 
than 15 years, WAPFs Maury has 
drawn a following that's as loyal as 
it is large. Whether he's on the air 
as emcee, disc jockey or sports- 
caster, his word is gospel. 



Of 



Of all Maury's shows, "Matinee in 
Birmingham" (Mon. through Sat., 
4:00 to 5:15 p.m.) is most popular. 
Maury spins favorite records — 
picked in his own daily poll — gives 
scores and interviews guests. 

Alabama 



Alabama-bound advertisers will 
love Maury, too... as literally hun- 
dreds of sponsors, present and past, 
already do. He's the right person- 
ality with the right show to spin 
sales records for you. 



radio 



Radio Sales will be happy to tell 
you all about "Matinee in Birming- 
ham" and the participations — in- 
cluding choice one-minute spots — 
now open. And so will we. Call your 
Radio Sales representative, or . . . 

'Pulse: Sept. -Del. 1951) 



WAPI 

"The Voice of Alabama" 

CBS in Birmingham 

Represented by Radio Sales 



1940 with announcements on NBC. A 
year later it shifted to ABC and spon- 
sored Famous Jury Trials over the full 
network. In 1946, it moved to Mutual 
and picked up True Detective Myster- 
ies. Within the last few months, Wil- 
liamson has been experimenting with 
TV announcements. 

Display pieces promoting True De- 
tective Mysteries are used on store 
counters, in display windows, and on 
trucks and cars. One of the interesting 
features of the program and its pro- 
motion is the offer of a $1,000 reward 
each week for information leading to 
the capture of a fugitive criminal 
named on that week's broadcast. So 
far, five have been captured as a direct 
result of the show. 

Other companies have used contests 
and offers successfully. The Walter H. 
Johnson Candy Company of Chicago, 
for one, makers of the Power House 
Candy Bar, has had good results. 

The company sponsors Captain Vi- 
deo on Tuesday and Thursday nights, 
7:00 to 7:30, at a cost of about $4,500 
a week. When it began sponsorship 
last January it used but five stations 
Monday nights only, now covers 20 
cities on the DuMont network. 

Earlier last year the company, 
through its advertising agency, Frank- 
lin Bruck in New York, ran a kids' 
premium offer on Captain Video. The 
first offer was made once only. More 
than 50.000 replies were received. 
While this was a free offer of a ring, 
it did call for three wrappers. A sec- 
ond offer called for 10c and two wrap- 
pers, and responses to this also climbed 
above the 50,000 mark. 

In addition to Captain Video, John- 
son sponsors three shows a week on 
WXYZ-TV, Detroit, and one a week on 
KLAC-TV, Los Angeles (through its 
subsidiary, Bishop Candy Company). 

The Los Angeles show, Hail the 
Champ, increased sales of Power House 
in the area more than 500%, accord- 
ing to the company. A contest on the 
first show pulled some 700 wrappers; 
on a later show responses reached 15.- 
082 in one week. A Hail the Champ 
Club built up a membership of more 
than 60,000 children. The show, a 
GAM Productions package, cost the 
company about $450 per show, not 
including station time. 

The Cadbury-Fry Candy Company 
picked up DuMont's Small Fry Club in 
September. It sponsors the show on 
Wednesday nights from 6:00 to 6:30 
at a cost of about $2,000 a week, airs 



56 



it over four stations. In addition, the 
company has a one-minute commercial 
on the Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, 
and Friday shows at about $300 each 
and participations on WGN-TV, Chi- 
cago, and WABD, New York. 

Earlier last year, M & M Candy, Inc. 
began sponsorship of the final half 
hour ol ABC's Super Circus, which 
now has a line-up of 33 stations for 
the 4:30 to 5:00 segment. Sponsorship 
is limited to alternate Sunday after- 
noons, and costs the company about 
$18,000 per broadcast. 

Other TV network sponsors and 
their shows include: Mason, Au & 
Magenheimer Confectionery Company, 
Chester The Pup on ABC-TV; Quaker 
City Confectioner) Company, Lucky 
Pup on CBS-TV; Wilbur-Suchard 
Chocolate Company, Homemakers Ex- 
change on CBS-TV; and Nestle Choco- 
late Company (formerly Lamont, Cor- 
liss & Company ) . Mr. I. Magination 
on CBS-TV. 

In the past, candy advertisers have 
used the market-by-market approach 
to broadcast advertising, basing their 
effort on the amount of candy con- 
sumed in various sections of the coun- 
try. Today, many of the larger manu- 
facturers think nationally, attempt to 
spread to as many varied and diversi- 
fied markets as their budgets permit. 

Highest candy consumption per 
capita is in Utah, due in large part to 
the non-smoking Mormon population. 
But the population of the state is so 
small that the high consumption is not 
a major factor in the candy business. 

Large users of spot television in- 
clude: Paul F. Beich Company, 12 sta- 
tions; E. J. Brach and Sons, 13 sta- 
tions; Brock Candy Company, 13 sta- 
tions; D. L. Clark Company, 41 
stations; and Hollywood Candy Com- 
pany, 24 stations. 

Actually, the Brock Company has 
been more active in spot radio than 
spot TV, currently uses an average of 
a minute announcement a day over 
167 stations. The company ties in its 
air work with a comic book promotion, 
has offered free comic books with 
Brock Bar wrappers. "The trade 
seemed to like the campaign a great 
deal," says W. W. Neal of Liller, Neal 
& Battle, in Atlanta, advertising agency 
for the Brock Company. "Requests for 
books have run to several thousand a 
week during the whole life of the cam- 
paign, and currently the demand is 
holding on about the same level as 
when the campaign started several 
months ago." 

SPONSOR 



Brock's present plans contemplate 
continuation of a program of approxi- 
mately the same size and on as many, 
or slightly more, stations during the 
first two quarters of 1951. 

The Beich Company also buys time 
on spot radio concentrated in the 
Southern states, has had announce- 
ments in eight markets since last Sep- 
tember. Tentative 1951 plans call for 
the use of morning radio announce- 
ment campaigns only, in about 20 
markets. 

Whether on a network or spot basis, 
candy manufacturers' advertising is 
turning more and more toward the air 
media. Chief reason stems from keen 
competition among producers, the need 
for the kind of advertising that inex- 
pensively promotes brand identifica- 
tion. 

Competition is keener than ever 
since production costs have increased 
and consumption has fallen off. In 
1948, several retailers raised the price 
of the bar to 6c and consumption 
dropped. In 1944, the per capita con- 
sumption averaged 20.5 pounds; it was 
only 17.3 during 1949. Consumer re- 
sistance in 1948 forced back the manu- 
facturer's price from about 80c a box 
(24 bars) to 72c. Now the price again 
is up to the 80-cent level, with the 
wholesaler demanding 95c from the re- 
tailer. 

Industry leaders predict a standard 
10-cent bar in the near future. Vend- 
ing machines and theatre concessions 
already have exerted pressure in this 
direction, and vending machines alone 
account for 25% of all bar sales. 

Radio has been giving the candy 
maker a good run for his money. A 
higher retail price and a higher mar- 
gin augurs increased use of the broad- 
cast media. * * * 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 43) 




Mr. Edwards 

industry which 



may 



The future devel- 
opment of televi- 
sion news like the 
future develop- 
ment of television 
itself depends on 
imponderables 
just now. The na- 
tional emergency 
may cause a cur- 
tailment of ex- 
pansion in the 
hold back the 



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growth of TV news coverage to some 
degree. Even so, we anticipate im- 
provement of techniques and a greater 
use of the medium during 1951 in the 
presentation of news, documentaries 
and ideas. Current ratings of the ma- 
jor news shows indicate stepped up 
audience interest in TV news. Those 
ratings should go even higher as the 
world moves into the critical spring- 
time. 

During 1951 we expect that film cov- 
erage of events will improve in quan- 
tity and quality. On the quantity side 
we anticipate using more film stories 
of spot news than heretofore, cutting 
the length of each one in order to 
cover more ground. It is probahle 
also that, barring restrictions on cable 
expansion, we will switch to other 
cities more frequently for film projec- 
tion close to the scene of events taking 
place. 

There probably will be greater use 
of on-the-spot pick up reports during 
this year; Washington personalities 
will be asked to give the TV news 
audience direct reports on mobilization 
and how it is to affect the lives of all 
of us. 

At CBS we plan to utilize more ef- 
fectively reports from our correspon- 
dents overseas. One program which 
will be aired on Saturday evenings will 
devote a whole section to cabled cap- 
sule accounts of spot news in Euro- 
pean capitals, Asia and elsewhere. 
The visual technique is not quite com- 
plete, but it will combine on-camera 
commentator with films, still picture 
and animation. 

It is also likely that the year will 
bring more programs such as Colum- 
bia's Challenge of the Fifties which 
was a roundup of CBS correspondents 
from all over the world, giving their 
first-hand reports on conditions in the 
countries they cover and featuring in- 
terviews with leading statesmen in 
most of the free world. 

1951 will probably see a continuing 
decrease in the meaningless and flip- 
pant kind of feature story on televi- 
sion. This is not to say that the good 
human interest feature will be crowded 
out of the picture. But it is to say that 
less news time will be devoted to fash- 
ion shows and beauty contests, more 
news time will be utilized in expand- 
ing the volume of news reported. 

We will be able to put more news 
into pictures tliis year than last, which 



is the general idea of TV news. But 
we feel that television's audience must 
be served a news bill of fare equal to 
radio's audience. And that idea will 
not be sacrificed for the sake of pic- 
ture. The motto will be: "News in 
Picture if Possible, But Give 'Em the 
News— All of It." 

Douglas Edwards 
CBS News Reporter 
New York 



RADIOS RETURN 

I Continued from page 35 I 

think it intelligent to drop the medium 
in a flurry of emotion." 

Bristol-Myers Company [Break The 
Bank and Mr. District Attorney on 
NBC radio, as well as Break The Bank 
or. NBC-TV and Lucky Pup on CBS- 
TV ) will boost its radio and TV ex- 
penditures 26'/' in 1951. "We believe 
you must use radio and TV as supple- 
mentary media if you expect to do a 
decent national advertising job," said 






SELL 



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LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 

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58 



SPONSOR 



Joseph M. Allen. B-M vice president. 
He added significantly: "Even if 
Americans bought another 7.000,000 
TV sets in 1951, the video market 
would still be .small compared to radio. 
Also, we believe it'd be poor business 
practice to buy into TV at the expense 
of radio."' 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Com- 
pany will spend at least an estimated 
$3,000,000 in radio in 1951, with a 
large slice going to People Are Funny 
on NBC and radio announcements. "So 
far, because of constantly increasing 
sales, we've been able to get into spot 
television on Kool, Raleigh and Vice- 
roy — not only without curtailing our 
radio budget, but, in fact, with a slight 
expansion of our radio budget at the 
same time," said J. W. Burgard. ad- 
vertising manager. 

To which B & W account executive, 
Courtland Dixon, of Ted Bates & Com- 
pany, appends: "We believe in spot 
radio to the nth degree. We're not 
hysterical. In case of a continuous TV 
freeze, we'd use radio even more." 

Don Paul Nathanson. advertising di- 
rector for the Toni Company, credited 
radio with a major role in building the 
sales success of Toni's permanent wave 
products. The firm decidedly does not 
believe in evacuating radio. In 1951, 
about half of the company's more than 
$6,000,000 budget will be dedicated to 
radio, and about 10/^ to TV. 

A spokesman for the Victor van der 
Linde Company agency declared em- 
phatically: "All our TV programing is 
built on new money. None is at the 
expense of radio budgets. Every single 
one of our accounts believes radio is 
very much alive." As proof, it was 
pointed out that two accounts — Dolcin. 
the pain-reliever, and Nattlage Foods 
— will be using both radio and TV in 
1951, and not by cutting into radio 
time. 

One surprisingly big deviant from 
the trend is B. T. Babbitt Company. 
Last month it scrapped its two day- 
time radio soap operas — oldtimer 
David Harum on NBC and Nona From 
Noivhere on CBS. This represented a 
whopping total network loss of $2,000,- 
000. But while the cancellations do 
mean that Babbitt is biting into its 
radio budget to enter TV, the transi- 
tion is not an entire loss to AM. 

sponsor learned that Babbitt merely 
intends adopting "different techniques 
and different vehicles." Thus, the com- 
pany hopes to fight back against Ajax 



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Using 17 spot announcements it costs over 5 times 
more to use TV than it does to use CKLW's domi- 
nant watt coverage . . . and . . . using CKLW you 
reach over 5 times more homes than you reach by 
using TV. Which means ... in this area it costs 
over 25 times more to reach one TV home than it 
does to reach one radio home when you use CKLW. 

For more tacts and figures on the sales 
impact of CKLW write today for the 
"Primer". A complete 8 page booklet that 
every time buyer will want to read before 
dealinrf with clients. 

' f'in/tilinuii County, Ohio not included ! 

50,000 WATTS 
800 ON THE DIAL 

CKLW 

GUARDIAN BLDC. • DETROIT 26, 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Rep. 



J. E. Campeau 

President 



15 JANUARY 1951 



59 




EXCLUSIVE! 



Shell Oil placed "Shell's Dinner 
Edition of the News" on KJR — 
their only radio in Western 
Washington. 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 
New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco • Atlanta 





"iviignty proud to have Gold Medal 
Flower," says Rev. Dwight "Gate- 
mouth" Moore, minister, disc joc- 
key, showman and 'character' fea- 
tured 2 hours daily and 3 hours on 
WDIA. In starting a ' 4-hour strip 
on the station admittedly control- 
ling 42 'r of Memphis (the other 5 
stations cover the white field), 
GOLD MEDAL joins a marvelous 
collection of America's finest adver- 
tisers like these: 

*FAB *Red Cross Spaghetli 
*I ; olger's Coffee *Arrid 
*Kools *Super Suds 
*Sealtest *Dentyne 
HOOPER SURVEYS PROVE WDIA 
HAS UP TO 75.6';; OF MEMPHIS 
NEGRO AUDIENCE. YOU CANNOT 
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OUT WDIA. 

\\ 1 u \ \* ■iniilii-. Tenne i ■ ■ . Beri i • ■ 
Mgr . Harold Walker. Com'l. Mgr.. John E, 
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Cleanser, which began threatening 
Bab-0 for dominance in the cleanser 
field back in 1947. As an experiment, 
Bab-0 will now. reportedly, squire Ruth 
And Eileen, la half-hour Saturday day- 
time drama on ABC-TV, based on the 
Ruth McKenney stories I . It will also, 
however, pick up the tab for five-to-six- 
times-a-day radio news reports on Mu- 
tual, in an attempt to capitalize on the 
growing interest in Korean war news. 

sponsor's survey discovered that a 
number of new sponsors have ventured 
into the TV fold, not out of hysteria, 
but only when the particular merchan- 
dising needs of their products seemed 
to derive most dollars-and-cents value 
fiom the visual impact of TV. Or as 
Miss Lillian Selb, radio and TV time- 
buyer for Foole, Cone & Belding, puts 
it: 

"None of our sponsors have gone 
hog-wild over TV. They just don't 
want to overlook any good bets. For 
example, our Rheingold Beer account 
found that, in the summer, five-minute 
TV announcements would naturally be 
suggestive for persons parched with 
thirst in the sun. So we entered TV. 
At the same time, you can be sure 
Rheingold didn't take money away 
from its valuable radio announce- 
ments." 

And the president of a large agency 
commented : "Our sponsors no longer 
aie panicky about getting out of radio 
— just as there's no panic to get into 
TV. Yet our clients are keeping a 
sharp eye out for the shrewdest ex- 
ploitation of their individual products. 
Some have found that certain demons- 
liable products — like a washing ma- 
chine — do have better visual impact on 
TV. So they've spent extra money on 
TV. Those that sell a packaged item — - 
like soap — where the visual effect is 
not important, have found TV less ef- 
fective. So they've stuck to their guns 
with radio." 

In its survey. SPONSOR found that 
the number of advertisers who discov- 
eied TV too rich for their blood are 
legion. Here are a handful who've 
learned from past lessons: 

The Whitehall Pharmacal Company 
in 1948 and 1949 entered TV experi- 
mentally, though not by nibbling into 
it;- radio budget. It bankrolled Small 
Fry on the DuMont network and Mary 
Kay and Johnny on NBC-TV. But at 
the end of a year's time, both shows 
were suddenly dropped. 

Explains Douglas Ballin, Whitehall's 
radio director: "One bin headache was 



60 



SPONSOR 



budget trouble. On radio, we'd been 
used to knowing in advance down to 
the last dollar what our budget would 
be. But on a show like Mary Kay, you 
just couldn't set up a budget. New 
props, new sets, new talent, would un- 
expectedly crop up, and knock our 
budget half-cocked. 

"The other drawback embraced sim- 
ple arithmetic. We found that our 
product Anacin — which is a low-cost 
item retailing at 19 cents to 98 cents — 
would have to sell a lot more in ratio 
to keep up with the high TV program 
costs. It didn't, so the TV show was 
dropped." 

Ballin adds, "We still believe radio 
to be the most effective vehicle for 
reaching the type of people who buy 
our products." Clear proof of this is 
the fact that Whitehall sponsors a 
jampacked stable of radio shows: Our 
Gal Sunday, Romance of Helen Trent, 
and Mr. Keen on CBS ; Just Plain Bill 
and Front Page Farrell on NBC; the 
Tuesday-Thursday segments of the 
Harry Babbitt, Show on CBS Pacific 
Coast network; a portion of NBC's 
The Big Show; as well as announce- 
ment schedules on over 200 stations. 

Then there was a sponsor who here- 
tofore had refused to sink cash into 
an unknown radio show that bucked a 
popular one at the same time. But 
when TV arrived, he made precisely 
the error he'd tried to avoid on radio. 
He hastily reached for his billfold to 
buy what he considered a good time 
franchise opposite a lavishly produced 
TV musical revue. Naturally, he suf- 
fered the consequences. Now thor- 
oughly jaundiced, the fellow is using 
magazine advertising. 

More and more advertisers are re- 
turning to radio because of zooming 
video costs, according to the survey. 
Max Tendrich, media director for 
Weiss & Geller, tells of one sponsor 
who cancelled his three 15-minute 
weekly radio programs to put all his 
adveriising eggs into a half-hour TV 
program. To his dismay, the adver- 
tiser found that time and talent on the 
video show cost 60% more than the 
three radio programs. The sponsor 
dropped video, and is considering a 
return to radio. 

George Wasey of Erwin, Wasey & 
Company, tells a similar story of the 
Barbasol account. The shaving cream 
agreed to sponsor a 15-minute digest 
of the week's news, News in Review, 
on CBS-TV, immediately following the 
Toast of the Town program. 



The news review ran for 52 weeks. 
But as Wasey says: "The sales results 
were not dramatic enough. For a 
packaged product that sold for less 
than $1, the advertising expense was 
way out of line." Barbasol turned to 
bankrolling Ray burn and Finch, a 15- 
minute disk-jockey radio show on 
WNEW in New York for six months in 
1950, and currently has other adver- 
tising plans in mind. 

Another viewpoint stressed by sev- 
eral advertisers is that TV and maga- 
zine advertising tend to reach the same 
urban areas, while radio penetrates 



markets not reached by either. There- 
fore, supplementary advertising seems 
called for. Norman W. Glenn, acting 
sales promotion chief for NBC, a 
strong advocate of the joint use of ra- 
dio and TV advertising, had this per- 
tinent comment : 

"A question that must be asked of 
any advertiser who is thinking of us- 
ing television as a basic medium is: 
'\\ hat happens to your advertising 
campaign in the South. Southwest, the 
Pacific Northwest, and even important 
parts of the Middle West?' 

"If an advertiser is selling goods 



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80 to 100 women gladly pay $1 for their break- 
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Televised from the luxurious Town and Country 
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CBS-TV Network— Affiliated with Columbus Dispatch 
and WBNS-AM Sales Office: 33 North High Street 



15 JANUARY 1951 



61 



there today, can he afford to ignore 
these markets? Can he afford to lop 
off completely Denver, Colo.; Portland, 
Ore.; Wichita, Kans. ? While it's true 
that these markets are not the New 
\ orks and Chicagos, it must be remem- 
bered that non-television America, in 
tne aggregate, is seven times as big as 
New York City in retail sales. ' 

Other advertisers are concerned be- 
cause TV (with its frozen 107 stations) 
still leaves 40 r r of the population liv- 
ing in areas where they can't reach a 
TV signal, even if they wanted to. In 
this connection, a Cities Service Com- 



pany executive pointed out : 

"Cities Service has been in radio 
for 25 years. It's always had happy re- 
sults with radios full market coverage. 
Rut when we experimented with The 
Band of America on NBC-TV for a 13- 
week simulcast, it became clear that 
TV's coverage needed reenforcement. 
Mind you. we may go back into TV. 
But we'd like to see a wider market 
first.'" 

It would be a fallacy, of course, to 
think that TV's bottled-up market has 
scared off advertising initiative. A 
case in point is International Silver 




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KTUL-KFPW 

JOHN ESAU, Vice President-General Manager 
Affiliated with KOMA, OKLAHOMA CITY 



62 



Company, a longtime bankroller of ra- 
dio's Ozzie and Harriet. 

Early in 1950. International decided 
io sponsor the half-hour Silver Theatre 
or. CBS-TV, m.c.'d by Conrad Nagel. 
The move seemed to be a sensible one. 
because video neatly lends itself to 
displaying silverware patterns. Soon 
two problems bobbed up to hamstring 
the producer: la) Not only were the 
time and talent costs excessive (about 
$17,000 a week for TV as compared 
with the approximate §14.000 a week 
for radio); but (b), as a spokesman 
for Young & Rubicam says, "The au- 
dience we reached was pretty darn nar- 
row." 

Although International dropped Sil- 
ver Theatre after 26 weeks, the firm 
wants to give TV another whirl. Un- 
daunted by past boobytraps, it will 
soon bankroll Success Story, a 15-min- 
ute daytime interview program with 
Betty Furness on ABC-TV. 

The looming global war has, of 
course, caused almost every advertiser 
to straighten up and think hard about 
his radio/TV advertising outlay. From 
the evidence gathered by sponsor, sev- 
eral consideratiens now influence the 
admen's thinking apropos the impend- 
ing wartime pinch : 

1. Admen, who remember bleakh 
the newsprint scarcity during World 
War II, want to make sure they'll be 
getting good time availabilities in ra- 
dio/TV during the coming years. 

2. Since most big manufacturers 
will have to divert their production 
fiom "butter to guns." they'll be pri- 
marily concerned with institutional ad- 
vertising. And both radio and TV, 
with their combined audiences, seem 
most propitious for that purpose. 

I A striking example is Speidel 
Watch Bands, which in 1949 evacuated 
radio completely to spend over $1,000.- 
000 on TV for What's My Name. 
NBC-TV. because its products' pat- 
terns are more demonstrable on video. 
But with the government's impounding 
of copper, aluminum and other strate- 
gic materials last month, Speidel is 
having a change of heart. Says ac- 
count executive G. William Anderson. 
Jr.. of Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 
Bayles: "If the war pressure keeps on. 
Speidel may have to get out of TV on 
a network basis and convert to a com- 
bination of AM and TV.") 

3. The anticipated 30' c reduction 
on the manufacture of TV sets in 1951 
(as electronic instruments and other 
valuable parts become scarce) plus the 

SPONSOR 



continuing freeze on the granting of 
licenses for new TV stations, have 
combined to make radio an increasing- 
ly attractive medium. 

4. The prospect that their wartime 
advertising will not be taxable has al- 
ready tended to encourage sponsors to 
hypo both their radio and TV timebuy- 
ing. 

In summary, as a result of its sur- 
vey, sponsor was able to determine 
two major points: radio has definitely 
staged a revival of interest in the eyes 
of national admen; and the future 
holds open increased business for both 
radio and TV. Certainly television will 
continue to flourish in 1951, on the 
basis of the firm foundation it built in 

1950. At the same time, radio, too, 
will grow in the new year, on the basis 
of its vast audience amassed over a 
quarter-century of experience. In the 
face of the darkening war situation, j 
any advertiser who blindly charges in- 
to one medium at the expense of an- 
other, will be merely cutting off his 
nose to spite his face. Used together, 
both media will provide admen with 
the widest possible advertising voice in 

1951. • * * 



TINTAIR 

{Continued from page 31) 

ecutive vice president and director of 
sales for Toni. 

After calling in Cecil & Presbrey last 
February to conduct consumer re- 
search, one thing became apparent to 
these three business musketeers: they 
had a tough job on their hands. Not 
only did they have to set up a new 
consumer's habit, as Toni had done; 
they also had to overcome the social 
stigma attached to hair dyeing in the 
home. 

However, they were not discouraged, 
because they were aware of the tre- 
mendous market ready to be tapped. 
I According to Byoir. at least 40% of 
the nation's women and 10/4 of its 
men are interested in "keeping the col- 
or of their hair young.") 

What was the strategy employed to 
break down the home hair coloring 
taboos and stimulate market interest'.'' 
Ed Cauley, Tintair account executive 
at Cecil & Presbrey, lists the chief fac- 
tors this way: 

1. Use the fashion authority pitch 
— convincing beauty editors and com- 
mentators on the magazines, newspa- 
pers, radio and TV that Tintair is gen- 



THE CBS STATIONS 

Covering the Top of the Nation 

ANNOUNCE 
THE APPOINTMENT OF 



WEED and COMPANY 

AS EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
EEEECTIVE IMMEDIATELY 



KCJB 

910 KG — 1000 W 
Minot, N. Dak. 



KSJB 

600 KC — 5000 W 

Jamestown, N. Dak. 



(Studios in Bismarck and Fargo) 

Owned and operated by — 

JOHN W. BOLER 




...Sep 



Blanket South-Arkansas and 
the Mississippi Delta by regional 
coverage with the COTTON 
BELT GROUP. Three sta- 
tions; one rate; and a call to 
Devney and Co., 535 Fifth 
Avenue will do it for you. Use 
KTFS in Texarkana, KDMS in 
El Dorado, and WGVM in 
Greenville for "blanket cover- 
age" of an area that's "second- 
ary" to the power boys. The 
cost is small. 



COTTON BELT GROUP 

Box 1005 

TEXARKANA, TEXAS 

Phone: 35-124 



Selling 
Power 

PROVEN BY ARBI 

Zke XL Stations 

of the Pacific Northwest 

• WASHINGTON 

KXLY— Spokane 

• OREGON 

KXL-Portland 

• MONTANA 

KXLF-Butte 
KXLJ-Helena 
KXLK-Great Falls 
KXLL— Missoula 
KXLQ— Bozeman 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 

347 Madison Avenue 6381 Hollywood Blvd. 
New York 17, N. Y. Hollywood 28, Calif. 



15 JANUARY 1951 



63 




Growth of retail sales 
% in the U. S. A* was in 

EL PASO 



B&fteat 



audience in this vital mar- 
keting area is delivered by 




RODERICK BROADCASTING CORP 
Dorrance D. Roderick Val Lawrence 

Pre s. Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
THE O. L. TAYLOR COMPANY 



• AMONG THE NATION'S 73 LARGEST CITIES, IN 
THE LAST 10 YEARS (Lit.il D.pL of Comm.rc. R.pori) 




Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent Hooper Leader since 
1943. Leads morning, afternoon 
and night! .... 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y., 
5,000 WATTS 

Representatives ... 
EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago 
LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Lot Angeles, San Francisco 



uine news; then let these authorities 
tell their audience about it. 

2. Use the celebrity endorsement ap- 
proach — advertise the fact that people 
like June Havoc, Gloria Haven, and 
Princess Obolensky are charmed with 
Tintair. 

3. Advertise heavily in TV because 
of its visual impact. 

4. Advertise wisely in radio because 
of its wide coverage. 

5. Advertise in fashion magazines 
like Mademoiselle, Vogue, and Har- 
per's Bazaar, to take advantage of the 
color display of the hair tint in their 
pages, and also to establish a kind of 
snob appeal. 

The campaign teed off in September. 
1950. with Tintair determined to ex- 
periment for a month in order to gauge 
the various media. One-minute an- 
nouncements were used for a period 
of four weeks over WDAF, Kansas 
City and for three months over KQV. 
Pittsburgh. 

At the same time, newspaper ads 
I full page I broke in Kansas City, Wil- 
mington. Del.. Trenton, N. J.. Allen- 
town, Pa., and Reading, Pa. 

One promotion device that worked 
wonders was that of staging demon- 
strations, with models, for the press in 
local cities. After one such demonstra- 
tion in Los Angeles, a beauty commen- 
tator expressed her admiration for 
Tintair over TV station KNBH. With- 
in 24 hours, more than 4,000 telephone 
calls poured into that NBC station, ac- 
cording to Byoir. with the result that 
a special telephone line was set up to 
switch the calls to the Broadway Store 
in L.A. 

Although smart public relations won 
the product articles and layouts in 
Life, Coronet, American Weekly, and 
Glamour, it was advertising in radio/ 
TV that has brought Tintair its most 
direct results, with "TV being the 
standout," according to Mitchell Fin- 
lay, Tintairs advertising director. 

On 18 October, Tintair's Somerset. 
Maugham Theatre (Wednesday, 9- 
9:30 p.m. I bowed in over CBS on 48 
TV stations. Show, which costs about 
$25,000 weekly for time and talent, has 
a 24.6 Nielsen rating. It features a 
weekly Maugham short story on film, 
with the 76-year-old, self-styled "old 
party" of Knglish literature, appearing 
himself on film to introduce and end 
carh dramatization. 

Start of the program was timed nice- 
ly to benefit from the Hollywood re- 



lease of Maugham's Quartet and Trio 
movies. At a giant press conference 
Byoir staged for Maugham in Manhat- 
tan, the dean of belles-lettres spoke 
highly of Tintair and TV. "I have nev- 
er been a writer who just wants to 
reach the intelligentsia," he said dry- 
ly. '"Now I am able to reach the peo- 
ple who have ceased to read." 

The program's commercial is deliv- 
ered by Maggi McNellis. billed as "one 
of America's 10-best-dressed women." 
Viewers get an eyeful of three models 
in various stages of Tintairing their 
hair, while three other lovelies pose 
behind frame covers of Mademoiselle. 
Vogue, Harper's Bazaar. 

Typical McNellis pitch explains that 
all three of these fashion mags advise, 
"Color your hair!" She goes on from 
there: "Remember, only Tintair has 
Vegetable Catalyst D . . . the wonderful 
coloring action that automatically turns 
off the coloring action after 15 min- 
utes. . . ." 

Cecil & Presbrey's Cauley says: "The 
reaction to our first Maugham show 
was an overnight madhouse. Wed ex- 
pected a stampede to the drugstore 
counters, but not the rush we got. Al- 
most all retail outlets were sold out 
within two days and crying to us for 
more merchandise. The fad caught on 
among young and old women — all 
wanting to tint their hair." 

Women stormed the Sun Ray Drug 
Stores in Philadelphia and the Katz 
Drug Stores in Kansas City, accord- 
ing to Cauley, asking for "some of that 
hair tint that Maggi McNellis was talk- 
ing about"; or, "I'd like the tint with 
the Vegetable Catalyst D in it I saw 
on the Maugham show yesterday." 

Amusingly enough, when Straus 
himself visited Gimbels in Manhattan 
to see how the product was selling, he 
was drafted into demonstrating Tintair 
behind one of the department store's 
counters. He escaped three hours lat- 
er — when the stock was sold out. 

Tintair has been having happy re- 
sults also with its 15-minute portion of 
the Meet Frank Sinatra radio show 
Sundays over 104 stations of CBS. 
Ibis disk jockey-celebrity interview 
program costs Tintair a gross $7,500 
a week and has had a Nielsen rating 
of about 3.6 since its debut 29 October. 
The commercial is chiefly notable for 
the way in which it glamourizes Tint- 
air's 12 different shades I Mona Lisa 
Brown. Golden Topaze. Canary Dia- 
mond, etc. I and its lilting jingle: 



64 



SPONSOR 



Yes — color your hair and do it 

today 
The wonderful, fabulous Tintair 



way 



No need to watch the clock, you 

see, 
Tintair has Vegetable Catalyst D! 

(Partially as a result of Tintair's ra- 
1 dio advertising, Cauley says, teen-age 
girls, smitten by the Sinatra charm, 
have turned to tinting their hair en 
masse in colleges and high schools. 

Much of the success of the Tintair 
campaign can be credited to close-knit 
cooperation between the sponsor and 
the agency. Initially, strategy meetings 
were held twice weekly. Usually pres- 
ent were Straus; Helen Golby, direc- 
i tor of advertising creations for By- 
mart; James Cecil, president of Cecil 
& Presbrey; Joe Lamneck, the agency 
TV commercial producer; David Lyon, 
supervisor of the Tintair account for 
the agency; Graeme Macleod, agency 
account executive who specializes in 
copy and singing commercials; and Ed 
Cauley. general agency account exec- 
utive. 

The 55-year-old Cecil & Presbrey 
agency ( which had about $15,000,000 
worth of billings for 30 accounts in 
1950 1 is a firm believer in spearhead- 
ing a campaign with both radio and 
TV. Predicts account supervisor David 
Lyon : "The way sales are boibng up, 
it could well be that Tintair will be 
seeking additional radio/TV time later 
on in 1951. We're lucky in having an 
aggressive sponsor like Mr. Straus, 
who knows you have to keep on push- 
ing advertising, the more you sell." 

What effect has Tintair's spiralling 
success had on the rest of the cosmetic 
industry? Tintair officials say one re- 
sult is that it has boosted the sale of 
allied products. The home hair color- 
ing sells at $2 I plus 20' v Federal tax ) 
and generally women also buy the 29- 
cent brush that goes with it. Too, the 
consumers have been buying makeup 
capes, wear rubber gloves ( to protect 
the hands I . shampoos, combs, towels, 
and mirrors. 

Certainly, another result is that Tint- 
air's campaign has touched off a spurt 
of advertising among its hair coloring 
competitors. Lawrence M. Gelb, presi- 
ident of Clairol, Inc. ( which sells most- 
ly to salons, but also has a 79-cent In- 
stant Clairol, which has been marketed 
through drug stores for 10 years), 
says: "Our advertising budget will be 
upped 1009? in the new year." He 

15 JANUARY 1951 



plans to enter radio/TV on a co-opera- 
tive spot basis, besides increasing 
printed media appropriations, and 
staging hair styling contests through- 
out the nation. 

A spokesman for the Roux Distrili- 
uting Co.. Inc. (whose hair coloring 
preparation costs from $3.50 to $5, but 
is sold largely in beauty shops) said 
the product will boost its magazine 
and newspaper advertising in 1951. 
"We're scouting around for a possible 
radio or TV show, too," the spokes- 
man added. The Tintz Co. of Chicago 
Sales Affiliates, Inc., of New York 
( which handles Inecto Color Cocktail 
Shampoo); and Duart Manufacturing 
Co. of San Francisco (Kolor-treet) are 
both stepping up printed media adver- 
tising. 

But what of the beauty salons? How 
do they feel about Tintair's infiltration 
into their preserve? Oddly enough, 
some of them seem quite delighted, 
rather than anguished. Feelings are 
summarized in the comment of D'Ami- 
co, a Fifth Avenue, New York, beau- 
tician and member of the National 
Hairdressers and Cosmetologists Asso- 
ciation. He told sponsor: 

"We're actually doing 100'/( more 
business since Tintair entered the field. 
One reason is it's caused people to be- 
come more hair-conscious. SecondK. 
people who've used home hair coloring 
and bungled the job. have come to us 
to get their hair one color, instead of 
all the spectrums of the rainbow. It 
takes a beautician one year's training 
before he can tint hair properly. How 
can amateurs be expected to do it in 
25 minutes?" 

However, Marion Sheehan, editor of 
American Hairdresser Magazine, be- 
lieves this attitude is sheer wishful 
thinking. "Tintair is a worthy prod- 
uct," she told sponsor, "and as of now, 
it's a definite 'Toni' threat to the trade. 
However, I think the home hair color- 
ing craze will eventually peter off. 
Women like being pampered in a beau- 
ty salon. The fuss and bother of wav- 
ing and coloring their hair in the home 
may eventually prove too much for 
them." 

If the Tintair campaign has proved 
anything, sponsor found, it is that 
there seems to be a bottomless gold 
lode in cosmetics waiting to be mined. 
Now, if another entrepreneur discovers 
a way of preparing an inexpensive lip- 
stick or powder in the home. he. too. 
may have a Toni by the tail. * * * 




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MUSIC LIBRARIES 

I Continued from page 33) 

gotten themselves firmly anchored. 
Duplicate libraries for FM stations be- 
came unnecessary when separate pro- 
graming was dropped. 

Coupled with this is the flood of free 
phonograph records I not radio tran- 
scriptions! which engulf radio stations. 
Record companies mail out thousands 
of current pop tunes to disk jockeys 
and music directors. Faced with the 
choice of $100 a month rental fees and 
free records, many stations are taking 
the cheapest way out. 

True, libraries provide a broad 
range of music unavailable free from 
record companies.. They build pro- 
grams, cue records, write continuity, 
and put out a high-fidelit\ recording 
arranged especially for radio. But a 
personable disk jockey can piece to- 
gether something acceptable right out 
of the mailbox. As for fidelity. Capi- 
tol Records I in competition with its 
own Capitol Transcriptions I about 
three years ago inaugurated a "Disk 
Jockey Special." Other record compa- 
nies soon followed. This was an extra 
edition made specifically for d.j.s on 
durable vinylite plastic I same material 
used for transcriptions). As a result, 
the music library business has been 
dropping of late. 

To counteract this downward trend, 
the companies each did some hard 
thinking. RCA Thesaurus began its 
"new era" ( November 1949 ) with new 
emphasis on selling. Associated hired 
high-powered salesman "Mitch" Mitch- 
ell away from NBC; Lang- Worth de- 
veloped its own eight-inch transcrip- 
tion disk to replace the traditional 16- 
inch model. All of them, including 
World, Capitol. Standard, MacGregor, 
and Sesac stepped up production of 
scripted shows. This was just one 
phase of the new music library ap- 
proach. From now on emphasis will 
be heavy on helping the subscriber sta- 
tion sell programs to a sponsor. 

There have also been some scattered 
attempts to work the other side of the 
street. Library services have ap- 
proached national advertisers directly 
and suggested large-scale sponsorship 
of their scripted shows. C. 0. Langlois. 
Sr.. of Lang-Worth, for example, has 
hundreds of feet of taped vocalizing 
by Allan Jones. By holding off release 
of the Jones material Langlois hopes 
to interest some large advertiser in ex- 
clusive sponsorship of the "package' 



in many markets. Once released, of 
course, any subscriber could sell the 
program. 

Associateds Maurice Mitchell has 
similar ideas. He'd like to see large 
national advertisers do with library 
programs what they've done with tran- 
scribed open-enders. Another Mitch- 
ell idea to increase national business 
for all music library subscribers: open 
an audition office in New York where 
advertising agency and sponsor big- 
wigs could listen to what's available on 
library disks. They could pick out a 
likely program from one of the many 
complete libraries available, then note 
down the stations who subscribe. This 
would hypo rentals for the entire in- 
dustry. 

Mitchell sets out very soon for the 
first of many regional sales meetings 
with Associated subscribers. In a re- 
cent letter to them, which incidentally 
stressed his radio background, he ex- 
plained the sales meetings: "Sure, 
"we'll take a few minutes to talk about 
the APS library — because broadcast- 
ers want to talk about and learn more 
about the library as a sales and pro- 
gram tool. But the bulk of each session 
will be designed to bring you up-to- 
date on what's new, different and suc- 
cessful in sales and programing ... in 
terms of what is actually being done in 
the field." 

Associated competitors, too, are 
straying from traditional music library 
functions. Every major company has 
recently added recordings to its basic 
selections which bear little resemblance 
to dance music or any other typical 
library material. These are the so- 
called "production aids." World 
Broadcasting, for example, has cut fea- 
ture program "signatures" (introduc- 
tions to their scripted shows), weather 
jingles. Christmas jingles, time signal 
jingles, and commercial jingles. World 
sales manager. Robert Friedheim re- 
ports widespread sales of all these 
short, announcement-type, transcrip- 
tions to local jewelers, car-dealers, 
clothing stores, appliance dealers — 
every kind of dealer. Commercial jin- 
gles are especially aimed at these busi- 
nesses: furniture, loan service, used 
cars, bread, mens clothing, jewelry, 
women's clothing, furs, and fur stor- 
age. The announcement-length tran- 
scriptions have undoubtedly spurred 
advertising bv local sponsors with 
small bankrolls to the delight of sub- 
scribers. 

Most of the other libraries offer sim- 



66 



SPONSOR 



ilar production aids. In addition some, 
like RCA, Lang-Worth, Standard, 
World, and Associated record "voice 
tracks" — spoken lead-ins by stars. 
World's Forward America, for exam- 
ple, has introductions and readings re- 
corded right along with the music in 
the same group of records. Voice 
tracks are also used extensively for 
"cross-plugs," where a star in one se- 
ries boosts another series in the same 
library. Again, there may be short 
dialogues between the star of a show 
and one of his soloists. There has also 
been an attempt of a few companies to 
simulate interviews between the local 
announcer and a performer. Announc- 
er reads from a script while the per- 
former's voice is on disk. 

It's a fairly safe bet that when one 
library service tries out a new gim- 
mick, and it makes a hit with subscrib- 
ers, the others will quickly adopt it 
too. Just one instance of this is the 
now common practice of inserting 
short segments of interlude music be- 
tween two selections played in a dif- 
ferent key. To avoid jarring the lis- 
teners' ears, the interlude starts in the 
key of one selection, ends up in the 
key of the following piece. Capitol 
Transcriptions is credited with pioneer- 
ing this gimmick, soon found itself imi- 
tated. The new emphasis on selling 
programs to sponsors has also been 
generally accepted, as well as the vast 
increase in production aids and script- 
ed program series. 

This means that any station with one 
of the six major, balanced libraries can 
be expected to have approximately the 
same musical and non-musical mate- 
rial on hand. These six companies 
(Lang-Worth, RCA Thesaurus, World, 
Standard, Associated, and Capitol) all 
include between four and five thou- 
sand selections in their basic library, 
send between 40 and 70 new selections 
out each month. Although there is no 
standard method for counting up the 
number of subscribers ( some services 
count three for a group of affiliated 
AM. FM, TV stations, some count only 
one ) each library services between 400 
and 600 stations in this country and 
abroad. 

Except for Capitol, rentals for the 
big six range between $120 and $300 
per month, usually for the duration of 
a three-year contract. Rate depends on 
the station's market, rate card, and 
whether the library is exclusive in that 
market. Capitol recently offered sta- 
tions a novel proposition: Go through 

15 JANUARY 1951 



Tforden's 



STARLAC 



BORDEN STARLAC 

EXCLUSIVE! 



To introduce a fine new product, 
Borden chose KJR and the Ann 
Sterling program for their only 
radio in Western Washington. 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVERY-KNODEl, INC 
New York • Chicago • Los Ang.l.i . $ an Francitco • Atlanta 








mm 398,780 

3 to 5 time weekly CKAC listeners. 

295,540 

6 & 7 time weekly CKAC listeners. 



rAO^ RtAl 
,.,o -*■-■" 

the * o! .-iWO* 1 

* to*, «*— 

Ir. - We toro«*° 

, xot»r>9 •»• bright - * 



C.C.I OT> 



67 



Typical music library programs {Continued from page 33) 













TIMES 




COMPANY 


PROGRAM 


TYPE 


LENGTH* 


PER WEEK* 


TYPICAL SPONSORS 


CAPITOL 


ANDY PARKER (and the 


Western serenade 


15 


min. 


3 


(Sponsor list not available) 


RECORDS 


Plainsmen ) 














KING COLE AND HIS TRIO 


Popular eombo 


15 


mill. 


1 




Sunset A Vine Sts. 


MAN FROM DIXIE 


Dixieland jazz 


15 


min. 


1 




Hollywood, Cal. 




(Pee Wee Hunt) 










1 AM, -WORTH 


i • \ ALCADE OF MUSIC 


Pop concert, top 


30 


min. 


1 


B. F. Goodrich Stores, KRGV, Weslaco. Tex. 


FEATURE 




vocal stars 








Calvey Motor Co.. WSCR. Scrantnn 


PROGRAMS, INC. 


THE COTE GLEE CLUB 


All-male voice old 


15 


min. 


5 


People's State Bank. WHTC. Holland. Mich. 


1 13 West r.Tth St. 
New York. N, Y. 




and new tunes 








Stegmaier Brewing, WKOK. Sunbury, Pa. 


THROUGH THE LISTENING 


Musical standards 


30 


min. 


1 


Admiral Television, WVNJ, Newark 


GLASS 










Longview Transit Co., KFRO, Longview, Tex. 




MEET THE BAND 


Name dance hands, 
(disk jockey 
show) 


30 


min. 


5 


Kelvlnator Dealers, WNVA, Norton, Va. 
Robert Hall Clothes, WMPS, Memphis 




RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 


Western and folk 
music 


15 


min. 


5 


Neil Motors. Ltd.. CKRM, Regina. Saskatchc 

wan 
Sears Roebuck. WOKZ. Alton. III. 




THE CONCERT HOUR 


Concert selections, 
classical, sym- 
phonic 


30 


min. 


1 


South Carolina Power Co., WHAN. Chanes- 
ton. S. C. 

II* nil /m. in Piano Co., CJOC, Lethbridge, Al- 
berta 


<:. P. MacCREGOR 


SAY IT WITH MUSIC 


Pop and standard 


15 


min. 


s 


(Candy manufacturers, dairy product com- 




BMI SHOWCASE OF MUSIC 


Popular, including 


30 


min. 


1 or 2 


panies, department, drug end furniture 


729 Western Ave. 




vocals 








stores, furriers, specialty shops are promi' 


I. «s Angeles, Cal. 


MELODIES THAT ENDURE 


Standards, semi- 
elassicals 


SO 


min. 


1 or 2 


nent among sponsors. No Individual spon- 
sor names available.) 




AMERICANA 


Western-type bal- 
lads, instrunrtal 
hits 

Music from world's 


SO 


min. 


1 or 2 






VARIETIES IN MUSIC 


15 


min. 


5 








music capitals 












HOLIDAY SCRIPTS 


Special scripts 


Varied 










with music for 














Xtnas. Easter. 














other holidays 










RCA RECORDED 


MUSIC BY ROTH 


Pop concert (Al- 


30 


min. 


3 


First Natl Bank of Mankato. KYSM, Man- 


PROGRAM SERVICES 




len Roth orch. 








kato, Minn. 


(Thesaurus Shows) 




& chorus) 








Webb Corp. (brewers). WOIII, E. Liverpool. 
Ohio 


120 East 23rd St. 
New York, N. Y. 


FRAN WARREN SINGS 


Pop, vocal, variety 


15 


min. 


5 


Tharp's lee Cream. WISL, Shamokin, Pa. 












Bell Lumber Co., KYUM, Yuma, Ariz. 
















THE TEX BENEKE SHOW 


Music in Glenn 
Miller mood 


15 


min. 


5 


Rosinski Furniture Co., WBEN, Buffalo, N.Y. 
Glasgow Tailors, KGBX, Springfield, Mo. 




THE MUSIC OF MANHATTAN 


Old & new B'way 


15 


min. 


S 


Michigan Mutual Ins. Co., WAVE, Louisville 




(Johnny Desmond, featured 


hits 








Badger Lumber Co.. WPAR. Parkersburg. 




artists) 










W. Va. 




MUSIC HALL VARIETIES 


Variety, vaudeville 
nostalgia 


30 


min. 


1 


Retail Merchants Assn.. WCPA, Clearfield, Pa. 
Darling Auto Co.. WLBZ, Bangor, Me. 




THE SINGING AMERICANS 


Male chorus. 


15 


min. 


3 


Participating spots. WBET, Brockton, Mass. 




(Dr. Frank Black) 


standards, pop 








Mdntce Carpet & Rug. WFMJ, Youngstown 


SESAC, INC. 


MISTER MUGGINS RABBIT 


Musical narrative 
for children 


30 


min. 


1 


(Sponsor list n.vt available) 


475 Fifth Ave. 


STARLIGHT SONATA 


Late-at-night 


15 


min. 


1 




New York, N. Y. 




dreamy music 












LITTLE WHITE CHAPEL 


Religious 


15 


min. 


1 






FIESTA TIME 


Snanish music 


15 


min. 


I 






MUSIC WE REMEMBER 


Concert 


30 


min. 


1 






DEEDS OF GLORY 


Narrated stories of 
American heroes 


15 


min. 


1 




STANDARD RADIO 


HOLL1WOOD CALLING 


Pop concert with 


30 


min. 


1 


Southern Theatres, KONO, San Antonio 


TRANSCRIPTION 




interviews 








Kepler Photo Co., WCOU, Lewiston, Me. 


SERVICES, INC. 


MEET THE BAND 


Pop dance orches- 
tra 


15 


min. 


6 


P.arkrr's Dept. Store. WGTM, Wilson, N. C. 
Shidler's Furniture, WSBT. South Bend, Ind. 


665 Fifth Ave. 
New York, N. \. 


MUSIC IN THE MODERN MOOD 


Pop concert 


30 


min. 


1 


Tidewater Telephone Co.. WNNT, Warsaw, 

Va. 
Hampton Looms. WBLT. Bedford, Va. 
















MUSICAL ROUNDUP 


Western variety 


15 


min. 


5 


Bell Furniture, KGA, Spokane. Wash. 
Victory Motors, WHYN, Holyoke, Mass. 




PERSONALITY TIME 


Popular vocal 


15 


min. 


5 


Danville Appliance Co., WDVA, Danville, Va. 
Peters Packing. WMCK, McKeesport. Pa. 




SPORTS PARADE 


Sports story, music 


IS 


min. 


3 


Breweries, auto dealers 


WORLD 


FOI1W ARD, AMERICA 


Patriotic, music 


30 


min. 


1 


Citizen's State Bank. KCOII. Houston 


BROADCASTING 




and reading 








S. II. Heironimns, WDBJ. Roanoke 


SYSTEM 


DICK HAYMES 


Popular vocal 


15 min. or 


5 or 


Bendix TV, WBUD, Morri.ville. Pa. 








30 


min. 


3 


Borden Lilv Ice Cream. WLAG, LaGrange, 


•IHH Madison Ave. 












Ga. 


New York. N. V. 
















HI SN MORGAN 


Popular music 


15 


min. 


6 


Pizitl Dept. Store, WJRD, Tuscaloosa. Ala. 
Coleman's Draperies. KVOX, Morrehead. 

Minn. 




HOMEMAKKR HARMONIES 


Household hints 


SO 


min. 


3 


Parker's Readv-to-Wear. WAUD, Auburn. 

Ala. 
Hennessey's Dept. Store. KOPR, Butte. Mont. 




STEAMBOAT JAMBOREE 


Riverbont music 


30 


min. 


1 


Phillips "66" Oil Co., KEIO, Pocatello. 

Idaho 
haiser-r'razer Dealer. KI'BB. Great Falls 




LYN MURRAY SHOW 


Standards in music 


30 


min. 


1 


Hick's Oriental Rugs. Ltd.. CJAD, Montreal 
Madsen Motor Sale-. KSVC, Richfield, Utah 




SO!\CS OF OUR TIMES 


Musical review, 
other eras 


30 


min. 


1 


S. S. Allan Dept. Store, WBUD, Morrlsville, 

Pa. 
Wills Music Stere. KSLM. Salem, Ore. 



im.iv \ ,irv friiin st uli-i 



to station 



library sho^s aro flexible ;is to length anil broadcast sc 



(lilies. 



our catalog of some 5,000 selections 
and check off the half which suit your 
program needs. We'll charge you $75 
a month for the first year, regardless 
of the stations power or market. The 
second year will cost .$50 per month, 
if you don't cancel after the first year. 
During third and succeeding wars th<- 
rental is paid on a month-to-month ha- 
sis. Full library and script service are, 
of course, still available. 

Despite the over-all similarity of the 
big six, they and the smaller "supple- 
mentary" services ( MacGregor, Cole, 
and Sesac) each have particular 
strengths and weaknesses. Lang-Worth, 
for example, is the only service put out 
on eight inch transcriptions, instead of 
the traditional 16-inch size. This saves 
weight, makes a smaller library pack- 
age physically, and is cheaper to pro- 
duce. 

Associated has its sales expert, 
"Mitch" Mitchell. Besides telling sta- 
tions how to sell library programs, 
"Mitch" will tell them how to sell 
time generally. And his experienced 
salesmen will walk into local retailers 
and sell Associated shows directly to 
an advertiser. They've already done 
it. Knowing "Mitch's" reputation, 
some broadcasters expect new custom- 
ers for Associated solely on the strength 
of his projected sales conferences. 

World is especially strong on com- 
mercial jingles, special open-end holi- 
day programs and production aids. 
This probably stems from its affiliation 
with transcription-making Frederic W. 
Ziv Company. One of the oldest firms 
in the business, if not the oldest, World 
comes as close to putting a complete 
show on transcription as it can without 
violating traditional library procedure. 

RCA Thesaurus, since its renovation 
several years ago under the "new era," 
has switched completely to aggressive 
selling for the station. Handsome bro- 
chures and audition disks to impress 
the local advertiser are standard, as 
with most other companies. A full kit 
of production aids is included in the 
basic selections and monthly release 
bulletins are in the form of a large 
calendar to help stations program in 
advance. RCA maintains its reputation 
for a strong classical and semi-classi- 
cal section in addition to the usual 
types of music. 

Standard and Capitol have full com- 
plements of the various kinds of music, 
except that Capitol leans heavily to- 
ward popular tunes. Capitol Transcrip- 
tions, newest comer to the library field 



Open IPoor to Homemakers 
of Central JVetr York .... 




Kay Russell 

Guiding genius of Ladies' Day, 
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consultant, Mrs. Russell is a 
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mother of four children. She is 
a member of the Jordan Com- 
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Women Voters and is active in 
Girl Scout and Boy Scout work. 



W'iVR-TV's brand-new women's 
service show features homemaking, 
fashions, cooking, beauty, child care 
— a complete VARIETY of women- 
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effective demonstration of your 
product by Mrs. Russell. 

Monday through Friday, 2:45 P.M. 
Participating 

Write, wire or phone for availabilities 




ACUSE 

Channel 5 




WSYR-AM-FM-TV — the Only COMPLETE 
Broadcast Institution in Central New York 



NBC Affiliate 



Headley-Reed, National Representatives 



It's 

"Teleways* 

for 

SUCCESSFUL 

Transcribed 
Shows 

Transcribed and ready to broadcast: 

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-minute top western musical pro- 
grams 
DANGER, DOCTOR DANFIELD 
26 half-hour exciting mysteries 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

156 15-minute shows with the King's Men 

singing hymns of all faiths 

STRANGE WILLS 

ha!f-hour shows dramatizing exciting 

and interesting stories behind wills 

MOON DREAMS 
1 5-minute romantic musical programs 
BARNYARD JAMBOREE 
52 half hours of good hill-billy music 

STRANGE ADVENTURE 
260 5-minute stories of interesting adven- 
ture 

OR 

Ciistom-Biiilt 
Transcribed Shows 

For Free Auditions and Prices Write 
RADIO 
PRODUCTIONS, 
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HOLLYWOOD 46, CALIF. 

Phones: 

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BMI 



26 



158 



TELEWAYS 



SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 

Networks 25 

AM 2,183 

FM 370 

TV 100 

Short-Wave 4 

Canada 150 

TOTAL BMI 
LICENSEES.. 2832* 

You are assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

*As of January 8, 1951 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOUYWOOD 



15 IANUARY 1951 



69 



ask 

Jims Blair & Co. 

about the 

llM\S & II UITI\ 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 

IHOD™ 
WTII-™ 

First Stations in Virginia 




COMPLETE 
COVERAGE 

Of Houston's entire mar- 
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time 5 Kw. operation. 
And, too, the experienced 
"Know How" from 33 
hard working "Cattle" 
broadcasters. 

i Houston 1 0(de<tf ^HeCefrettdtnt 




HOUSTON, TEXAS 



(just after World War III. does not 
stock the same records in their library 
as the parent Capitol Records. Artists 
do, however, often record different ar- 
rangements and tunes for both. Being 
a comparative new-comer, Capitol has 
found it desirable to stimulate rentals 
by adding new wrinkles to the library 
business (like the present attractive 
deal for just part of their library). 

Sesac leans heavily toward religious 
and band music. It carries many pub- 
lic domain tunes and those which it 
licenses for music publishers, carries 
no popular music. Sesac, for whom the 
library service is a secondary opera- 
tion, does its main business as a licens- 
ing agent for music publishers. Com- 
pany collects fees from stations and 
others who play music it handles. Spe- 
cializing as it does in "music of last- 
ing interest" Sesac appeals strongly to 
religious and educational institutions 
too. Especially since its rates are the 
lowest in the field— from $40 to $57.50 
per month. This rental fee includes use 
of several scripted shows, few high- 
pressure production aids, and no voice- 
tracks. Most stations consider Sesac a 
"supplementary" — excellent if a full 
range of music isn't necessary or to 
augment a larger library. 

The M. M. Cole library, which sells 
heavily in the midwest, carries Sesac, 
BMI, and public domain selections, but 
no ASCAP tunes. There is no popular 
music included in subscriber's tran- 
scriptions and very little semi-classical. 
Its main emphasis rests on western, 
folk, religious, and novelty tunes — mu- 
sic popular in the area where Cole is 
strongest. 

MacGregor is also considered a "sup- 
plementary" library because of its 
weak representation in several depart- 
ments, though it claims to be first firm 
in business (1928). It does, however, 
service programs with regular script 
deliveries. MacGregor headquarters 
are in Hollywood, where they also tran- 
scribe many of their open-end dramatic 
and mystery programs. The strong 
trend toward selling programs for sub- 
scribers isn't as apparent with thi- 
company as it is with the big six. Its 
prices are lower, however, and this li- 
brary may be owned after three years 
rental. In this outright sale feature the 
Miliary is unique. 

With so many companies, large and 
small, delivering sales pitches for their 
service the water is rather murky in the 
library service business. This murki- 
ness is further deepened by sonic cur- 



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rent problems. One is the problem of 
war productions effect on materials. 
Can the companies continue to get all 
the virgin vinylite they need? Maurice 
Mitchell, for one, thinks not and is say- 
ing so. He, and others in the field, ex- 
pect vinylite and the precious metals 
used to make master records will be- 
come scarcer. That means fewer sub- 
scribers, possibly fewer new selections 
added each month. 

The other problem is still the free 
record proposition. Unless these same 
material shortages clamp a lid on rec- 
ord company giveaways ( another Cap- 
itol innovation ) . library services will 
have some hard work ahead. When 
service companies can ensure stations 
repayment of their rental fee by selling 
or helping to sell their programs to 
sponsors the problem I for libraries) 
will be licked. Progress in that direc- 
tion so far is excellent. Eyes are still 
on Associated to see what new gim- 
micks Mitch will come up with. 

There are other problems too. Seri- 
ous ones that may well determine 
whether music libraries as they are 
now known will continue. But indus- 
try leaders are wide awake, willing to 
change their style if it will help. There 
are lots of innovations taking place 
among library services, many of them 
aimed at luring national and regional 
advertisers into the fold. It will pay 
them to keep an eye on what happens. 

With this article on music libraries 
and related services, sponsor concludes 
its four-part series entitled "Spot pro- 
graming status report." The first arti- 
cle in the series appeared in the 20 No- 
vember, 1950 sponsor and concerned 



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4 December and covered transcribed 
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Together, these four articles consti- 
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A134 "Advertising Problems Dur- 
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in a seller's market is stressed. 

A 135 "Tele-Census," Woodbury 
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advertising is preferred by TV viewers 
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color was one to two years off. 

A136 "What Every Advertiser 
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A138 "KTTV Channel 1 I," KTTV, 
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A 139 "A Netc Approach to the 
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A 140 "Radio !\etvs Is Bigger Than 
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A 141 "Silver Anniversary," \VR\ \. 
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A142 "Lourenco Marques Means 
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A143 "W MAR-TV," WMAR-TV, 

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A144 "Eat at Joe's," Westinghouse 
Radio Stations. Inc., Washington, D. C. 
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ries on advertisers who have used radio 
stations KDKA, KYW, WBZ, WBZA. 
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CITY & STATE 



15 JANUARY 1951 



71 




510 MADISON 

[Continued from page 16) 

daytime rate at 6:(M) p.m., was neces- 
sarily representative of the value de- 
livered by the station. In some cases, 
the station's nighttime rate should be 
lower than their daytime rate due to 
the audience delivered at the various 
times. Our continuing charts of the 
various rating services make us feel 
more and more that tuning habits are 
governed by programs rather than by 
stations. Therefore, it is highly possi- 
ble that moving fifteen minutes either 
way, from a high rated program, would 
not necessarily deliver a good buy. Of 
course, as you point out, most of the 
rating services which we have are a 
"crystal ball" from the standpoint of 
the actual measurement. However, we 
do not feel that the addition of another 
rating service would be of any great 
help. Isn't it possible that within the 
framework of one of the existing serv- 
ices an answer can be found to both 
quantitative and qualitative measure- 
ment of audience? 

There seems to be little doubt that 
we greatly need a measurement of who 
is listening rather than how many. For 
example, suppose I placed in front of 
you three bottles — a magnum, a fifth, 
and a pint. On these bottles are no la- 
bels. Your natural reaction would be 
to pick up the biggest bottle if they 
were all about the same color. That 
big bottle might be filled with poison, 
for all you know. If proper labels were 
applied, the fine Scotch label applied 
on the pint bottle and a skull and cross 
bones on the big bottle, you would cer- 
tainly choose the smaller bottle. In the 
same way, a highly rated program con- 
taining few of an advertiser's most 
likely prospects can be more wasteful 
of his advertising dollar than a lower 



rated program of concentrated audi- 
ence of prospects. At least, that is our 
theory and it has proved successful for 
advertisers who have gone along with 
us on it. 

Another theory which we have been 
working on is the effective use of sec- 
ondary stations to develop impact for 
a given sum of money, through a larg- 
er number of spots than could be 
bought on a high rate station. This is 
merely the theory of saturating a small- 
er audience and making a sale rather 
than making a weak pass at big au- 
dience. The two or three times that 
we've used this technique, the results 
have been quite amazing. 

There's little doubt that networks 
need to do a selling job for radio and 
that the radio stations themselves must 
join in with it. Many of us who saw 
the BAB film, "Lightning That Talks," 
were quite disappointed. There were 
so many positive things to say about 
radio that the negative and highly com- 
petitive approach to other media 
seemed to us to be unnecessary and in- 
effective. 

Of course, the stations have a big 
point on their side in that their na- 
tional spot business, which brings them 
an even greater revenue than network 
business, had an all time high even in 
television markets. 

I hope that you will pardon this rath- 
er rambling letter, but your editorial 
is definitely thought-provoking. I hope 
that it will create some "action," pref- 
erably on a shirt sleeves selling basis, 
rather than strictly at "Policy Level." 
Gene M. Lightfoot 
Radio Ar Television Director 
Evans & Associates 
Ft. Worth 



I read your 1 January editorial with 
interest. Most broadcasters will, or 
should agree with its premise. 

The difficulty, as I see it, is to find 
one method of circula'ion analysis 
which is acceptable to broadcaster, 
agency, and advertiser. Specific pro- 
gram audience analysis can and must 
be supplemental. 

It will he difficult to sell old BMB 
subscribers on another circulation sur- 
vey. We were among the first to sub- 
scribe to both BMB surveys. We lis- 
tened with rapt attention to the pleas, 
and the threats of agency executives 
for enthusiastic financial backing of 
this much needed measurement. Agen- 
( -ics — timebuyers — had to have a 
standard form of circulation measure- 



ment — they "would be forced to favor 
the stations which subscribed — etc." 

So what happened. The results of 
both surveys were hailed by Agency 
executives as indispensable aids — un- 
til the latest Hooper came out! Apolo- 
getically (in some instances) timebuy- 
ers could only buy time in, or adja- 
cent to, the highest Hooperated period. 
These same timebuyers privately ad- 
mitted the incompleteness of Hooper 
reports — admitted that the small sam- 
ples in many instances "indicated" 
practically nothing. Yet they had to 
have an alibi for their choice. What 
about BMB? "We've looked it over — 
you look swell — but really now, the 
figures are a bit old, aren't they?" 
I We have some good Hooper periods 
ourselves.) 

I believe every thoughtful person in 
the station and of the broadcasting 
business knows the need for a sound 
realistic measurement of station audi- 
ence, but most of us do not want to 
throw hard-earned money down any 
more "indispensable" drains. 

Jim LeGate 

General Manager 

W10D 

Miarn i 



WMT Memo: 

from: Bill Quarton, general manager 
to: WMT sales staff 
RE: Radio: Guesswork Medium. 
sponsor. 1 January, p. 64 
"A good many of us recognize that 
radio must do a better job of selling 
AND make available more and better 
facts and figures if we are to get the 
most out of radio. That is why I have 
been willing to spend so much time on 
the organization of BAB. There isn't 
a great deal the individual station can 
do but there is ONE thing, for sure, 
and that is to prove to our clients and 
prospects that WMT is one hell of a 
good buy! Don't let them forget it. 
You believe it and I believe it, so tell 
them over and over. The Hooper is 
sensational but we also have 27 years 
of experience and case histories. BMB. 
and stacks of additional data." 

Letters appearing on this 
page are in response to last 
issue's editorial entitled: 
"Radio : guesswork medi- 
um." These are but a few of 
the dozens received thus far. 
Other letters will appear in 
the next issue. 



11 



SPONSOR 



THE KANSAS CITY MARKET 

Does Mf Ran /h C/rc/es/ 





and Only The KMBC-KFRM Team 

Covers It Effectively 

and Economically! 




Daytime half-millivolt contours shown in black. 



Conlan's 1950 coincidental survey of 146,000 calls in morning, afternoon and nighttime periods! 

the Kansas City Primary Trade Territory reveals The The KMBC-KFRM Team provides advertisers with 

KMBC-KFRM Team in the lead by a wide margin over complete, effective and economical coverage of Kansas 

all other broadcasters. City's Primary Trade area — without waste circulation. 

In addition, the September-October Hooper report for For full information on your best buy in the Heart of 

Metropolitan Kansas City shows KMBC in first place in America, call KMBC-KFRM, or any Free & Peters "Colonel." 



BC-KFRM 



6TH OLDEST CSS AFFILIATE PROGRAMMED BY KMBC 



li 




e 7 

13 i* 15 16 17 
21 22 23 24 




1 
Ul 
(ft 



« 






S 1 o 5 "* « '« l\ 

f 6 1 17 18 13 |0 21 22 
1, 24 2 5 26 2T 28 29 



15 16 17 18 1 
22 23 24 25 2€ 
28 29 30 31 



16 17 18 18 £ 2^ 22 
2 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 




needs a new 



CBS prints this calendar for the benefit of those people 
in radio who are obliged to reach back into 1048 and 1949 
to find figures that will support their claims for circulation, 
audience, billings, cost-per-thousand. or whatever. 
Fellows, while your backs were turned, it became 1950. And 
after a while, even 1951. And as of 1951, it's like this: 

CBS starts 1951 with the highest average ratings in network 
radio: 26' '< higher than the second-place network. 1 

CBS starts 1951 with the highest billings in network radio: 
11% above 1949, 13% above the second-place network. 2 

CBS starts 1951 with the lowest cost-per-thousand homes 
reached in network radio: 33' i lower than the second 
thriftiest network. 3 

CBS starts 1951 with the largest circulation in network radio: 
895.000 more homes than the second-place network. 4 



'January-November, 1950. NRI. 2 January-September, 
1950. PIB. "January-October. 1950, NRI. 'February- 
March '50, NRI (all right, this is our least up-to-date 
figure, but it's nearly two years more up-to-date 
than the latest figures quoted by some broadcasters.) 







re .. * B j$H if <l - • &* 

f 




Columbia Broadcasting System 



> kNUARY 1951 



50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 



PANY, \H 

DAYTIME TELEVISION: 
40 page Special Section— pp. 33-72 






Daytime TV 
Digest Page 



page 33 




page 3f 



Daytime TV: 

Spot 

Programing 



page 42 

Daytime TV: 

Network 

Programing 

page 44 

Daytime TV: 
14 Result 
Stories 

page 49 

TV Stations 

Time-on-air 

Chart 

page 54 

Mr. Sponsor 
Asks 

page 74 




Ive me liberty 



trick Henry's immortal words, delivered from pew 72 
of Old St. John's Church, Richmond, in the year 1775, 
are an inspiration to countless Americans today. 
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet as to be purchased 
at the price of slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God. 
I know not what course others may take, 
but as for me, give me liberty or give me death." 
Through the years citizens of the Old Dominion have cherished 

their heritage of freedom, have contributed mightily 
to its advancement. As they listened to the impassioned plea 
of a great pioneer and prophet 175 years ago, 
so they look, listen, and thoughtfully 
form opinions today. In the process, 
they know that the First Stations of Virginia, 
WMBG-AM, WCOD-FM, WTVR-TV 
are theirs to command. 



Old Sf. John's Church, Richmond 



WMBG 



AM 



WCOD 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by John Blair & Company 




WTVRtv 



'O/V s <=> v 



JA " 1951 



WHY IS LINNEA LEAVING? — As this issue went to press, New York gossip-mill was 
buzzing with dozen or more reasons why J. Walter Thompson's Linnea Nelson (who 
rates Miss Timebuyer title along with Beth Black, Reggie Schuebel, and one or two 
others) is leaving. Simple fact is that happily-married Linnea has long debated 
making career of homemaking ; finally decided to take step. 

7957 YEAR OF SALES CLINICS- — Alert broadcasters and services bringing radio/TV 
field more shirt-sleeve "dollars-and-cents" sales sessions this year. Under John 
Patt leadership, 11 key WJR-WGAR-KMPC execs flew to New York late January to give 
full story of stations' progress and personalities to Petry salesmen (repping 
WJR, WGAR) and H-R Representatives (repping KMPC). Local personalities described 
themselves via pictures and recordings. In February, Associated Program Service 
(featuring Mitch's sales pitch) holds "First Subscriber Conference" at Greens- 
boro, N. C. In 1950, Free & Peters held sales clinic in Chicago that probably 
will serve as model for others. 

HOW RADIO AND TV COMPARE IN HOMES REACHED — Tops in radio homes reached, 
according to National Nielsen Ratings for 11/26-12/2, were Lux Radio Theater and 
Jack Benny with 9,280,000 and 8,995,000 respectively. Tops in TV homes reached, 
according to American Research Bureau national ratings for 12/1-8, were Texaco Star 
Theater and Philco TV Playhouse with 6,500,000 and 4,650,000 respectively. Trans- 
lating percentages into homes, now done regularly by Nielsen and ARB, helps spon- 
sors check air media values, reveals many useful facts. 

NEWS IS UP — Evidence of upsurge of news listening seen by such Walter Winchell 
rating facts as (1) jump from 10th to 6th in Nielsen "Top Radio Programs" for 
11/19-25, and husky increase of 3.3% over previous rating; (2) leader in New York 
Pulse "Top Ten" for 12/1-7 with 17.8% rating (13.7% in Nov.) ; (3) 28.3% rating in 
Mobile Pulse, 12/1-7; (4) second on Los Angeles "First 15 Hooperatings" (Nov.- 
Dec.) with 20.9%. Other newscasts peppered top ratings. For example, Minneapolis 
December Pulse had Cedric Adams ahead of Godfrey and Bergen with 18.7%; Drew Pear- 
son showed well on Sunday daytime listing. (See "Are You Getting the Most Out of 
Your News Sponsorship?", page 23.) 

THAT 7937 CLASS AT CREICHTON — 1931 class at Creighton U. , Omaha, graduated fol- 
lowing into broadcast advertising ranks: John J. Gillin, Frank Fogarty, Frank 
Headley, Frank Pellegrin, Hugh Higgins, Tom Coleman. Another advertising-minded 
class was 1931 U. of Chicago. Some of its members were Louis Cowan, Edgar Grun- 
wald, Norman Glenn, Arnold Hartley. Can you top them? 



SPONSOR, Volume 5, No. 3, 29 January 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore, Md. Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22. $8 a year in V. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postoffice under Act 8 March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 29 January 1951 

HOW MUCH TV SATURATION IN LANCASTE R? — Protest by John Hymes, general manager 
of WLAN (Lancaster, Pa. ) , over 84.7% TV homes figure credited to Lancaster area in 
12/23 TV Digest points up inconsistencies of TV-homes statistics. As Hymes sees 
it, TV Digest took 72,000 sets distributed over 40-mile radius embracing 270,825 
homes, credited them all to metropolitan Lancaster area totaling 85,000 homes. 
Trouble stems from fact that TV-homes tallies now being funneled into NBC Research 
Dept. via all TV areas are garnered differently in each area. Hugh Beville, NBC 
research chief, doesn't like it; hopes television trade association will work on 
project to achieve uniformity. Surprisingly, with diversity of methods, over-all 
totals jibe with RTMA set shipment statistics. 

ADMAN VON ZEHLE SUGGES T S SIMPLIFIED TV CALL LETTERS — In letter to FCC William 
von Zehle, president of New York advertising agency bearing his name, proposes 
abbreviating current TV listings, e.g., WCBS-TV Channel 2 would be referred to 
as CBS-2. 

NATIONAL ADVERTISERS LIKE WMMN B LOCK- SELLING — Frigidaire, Norge, Philco, 
Kelvinator, Westinghouse share 15 minutes 5 days weekly on WMMN (Fairmont, W. Va. ) 
"Homemakers* Hour" to advertise electric refrigerators on competitive basis. 
Block-selling technique first was created by general manager Allen (Dutch) Haid 
for 8 local used-car dealers. Exceptional results extended technique to cooking 
school in which 12 appliance dealers participated. Present show came next, with 
10 of 12 manufacturers already signed up (through national headquarters decision) 
for current and future participation. 

RADIO AWARDS FOR BEST DEPARTMENT STORE COORDINATED CAMPAIGNS — Added for 
first time to annual department store radio contest cosponsored by BAB and NRDGA 
were awards for "best coordinated use of radio with other media." 1950 winners, 
just announced, were Schuneman's Inc., St. Paul (large stores) ; George Wyman Inc., 
South Bend (small stores). In both cases newspaper, point-of-sale were effec- 
tively linked to radio. Both stores used wide-coverage stations (Schuneman's: 
WDGY — George Wyman: WSBT) to attract out-of-town as well as in-town business. 

FEDERATED NAB — With formation of autonomous TV setup within framework of NAB, 
including contemplated 13-man board, industry has virtually adopted plan outlined 
by SPONSOR in 6 June 1949 issue titled "Blueprint for a Federated NAB.'' Autono- 
mous FM organization must come about before SPONSOR "Blueprint" is completed. 

HARD -HIT TING "SELL R ADIO" PRESENTA TION DUE A T APRIL NAB CONVENTIO N— All- 
industry "sell radio" presentation, with 4 networks, Nielsen, Hooper, Pulse as- 
sisting NAB and BAB, scheduled for unveiling at NAB Convention in Chicago. Fin- 
ished product will utilize important existing material not yet publicized— may do 
2 jobs, (1) "sell the listener," (2) "sell the advertiser." 

(Please turn to page 80) 



SPONSOR 



NO. 19 OF A SERIES 



-*£< 5 



K&7 

,-t 



\<y, 






1 



a °^ b s ss boo- 

Rochester »« HEC leads 
peratedl . 
mornin 
evening by * 



S8K§s83S£ 



fternoon an< 
de margins- 






GEORGE SISLER 

In Hits per Season, - 



,> 



WHEC 

In Rochester 



10H0 II** 
RECORD f*« , 



In 1920 Sisler, playing for the St. Louis 
Browns, made 257 hits. George Sisler's 
amazing u hits per season" record has 
never been topped since! 

In 1943 Rochester's first Hooperating 
reported the decided WHEC listener pre- 
ference. This station's Hooperatings have 
never been topped since! 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




N. Y. 

5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



29 JANUARY 1951 




DIGEST FOR 29 JANUARY 1951 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER 3 



ARTICLES 



How to make the most of your news sponsorship 

There's been a boom in radio news sponsorship since the Korean crisis. 
Experts provide tips to aid newcomers to the news fold 



The Alka-Seltzer story: part two 

One discouraging experience with radio didn't keep Miles from mediur 
which was to spur firm's rise to sales heights 



Debate: What happened in Pittsburgh? 

Was the newspaper strike "costly to business" as claimed by the Bureau of 
Advertising? The BAB and Bureau of Advertising air their views 



23 



26 



28 



TWA takes to the air 

Trans World Airlines is first airline to sponsor network radio show. Will it 

set broadcast pace for aviation industry? «*" 



Special section: Daytime television 33-72 

Basie faets ami figures 

Covers scope, audience, costs of daytime TV *>4 

Problems of a TV soap opera 

A study of P&G's pioneering sponsorship of a TV strip drama *»© 



Daytime TV: spot programing 

Local programing is pushing into early hours, pulling hard for 
sponsors 

Daytime TV: network programing 

Daytime TV's rise to importance is spurred by expanding network 
programing 

Daytime TV results 

Fourteen capsuled result stories about use of daytime TV 

Time-ott-air ehart 

Complete listing of sign-on, sign-off times for every TV station in 
country 



COMING 



Hearing a'uls on the air 

Beltone, other hearing aid manufacturers, are turning to radio. Their 

strategy and programing approach will be featured IX JrOO. 

Columbia Workshop 

An account of how their pioneering efforts had a beneficial effect on radio 

programing, with implications for today's programing problems "2 web* 



42 



44 



48 



54 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 6 

MR. SPONSOR: IAN R. DOWIE 10 

P. S. 12 

510 MADISON 16 

NEW AND RENEW 17 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 74 

ROUNDUP 78 

QUERIES 82 

TOOLS (BROCHURES) AVAILABLE 103 



SPONSOR SPEAKS 



104 




COVER: J. Walter Thompson's Linnea Nel- 
son, veteran timebuyer, retires this March 
after over 23 years with the agency. Pictured 
with Miss Nelson are two of her top assistants, 
Anne Wright and Jim Luce. 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editor: Erik H. Arctander 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Ka.y Brown (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast 
Manager), George Weiss (Southern Rep- 
resentative), John A. Kovchok (Production 
Manager), Edna Yergin, Douglas Graham 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villanti 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Pulished biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22, 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
SCO N. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 6-1556. 
West Coast Office: 0087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Offlse: 3110 Elm 
Ave.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue, New Y'ork 22. N. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 




KGW 

WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



in the ORECQ, 



mum 





BROADCAST MEASUREMENT 



BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSHIP 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's efficient 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area and 
reaches more radio families than any other Portland 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys bear 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the population 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and South- 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
(From 1949 BMB Survey) 



Cooperation is the keystone in the success of Mt. Angel's economic 
history. Five farmer-owned co-operative organizations — a creamery, 
hop-producing co-op, flax plant, oil co-op and a co-operative warehouse 
and grain elevator — have strengthened and stabilized the prosperity of 
this Oregon community. Mt. Angel's cheeses are world-famous ... a 
Mt. Angel dairy cow recently set a world's record for butterfat production. 
KGW's COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE of this healthy, growing mar- 
ket was proven by a recent Tour-Test, conducted in cooperation with the 
Oregon State Motor Association, and witnessed by Mayor Jacob Berchtold 
of Mt. Angel. KGW delivers Mt. Angel, as it deliver the rest of the 
nation's fastest-growing market! 




KGW 





DAYTIME 

KGW 350,030 

Station B 337,330 

Station C 295,470 

Station D 192,630 



NIGHTTIME 
KGW 

Station B 
Station C 
Station D 



367,370 
350,820 
307,970 
205,440 



Thi3 chart, compiled from offi- 
cial, half-milivolt contour maps 
filed with the FCC in Washing- 
ton. D.C., or from field intensity 
surveys, tells the story of KGW's 
COMPREHENSIVE COVER- 
AGE of the fastest-growing mar- 
ket in the nation. 



PORTLAND, OREGON 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



29 JANUARY 1951 



BETWEEN 3 
COMMERCIALS 



BY 

KAY 

MULVIHILL 



Thousands of war veterans 
stationed in Bay Area hos- 
pitals are now enjoying tele- 
vision in their wards thanks 
to KPIX's "TV Sets for 
Vets" campaign. The enthusiastic re- 
sponse of Northern California viewers 
to KPIX's call for funds was a gratify- 
ing indication that the spirit of giving 
still prevails. 

Recently, on the Del Courtney Show, 
twenty-five of the television sets were 
presented to representatives of Oak Knoll, 
Travis Air Base, Mare Island and Letter- 
man hospitals. An additional number will 
go to other veterans' wards within the 
next few weeks. 

The donations, which have poured in 
to the station from hundreds of people 
throughout Northern California have 
far exceeded all expectations. 

ACADEMY AWARDS 

Plans are now underway for San Fran- 
cisco's Academy of TV Arts and Sciences' 
Annual Awards dinner. The banquet is 
scheduled for February 24, at which time 
awards for outstanding work in the past 
year will go to local talent and stations. 

RENEWALS 

Sherman Clay has renewed sponsor- 
ship on KPIX's "Music Album," which 
now goes into its third year. The popu- 
lar feature, which is San Francisco's 
oldest TV musical program, includes 
organist June Melendy, emcee Sandy 
Spillman and guest vocalists in its 
1951 series. 

Eaglesons' Clothing Co. also renews 
on "Talent Showcase" — a program that 
has been a stepping stone into the en- 
tertainment world for many a talented 
contestant. 





by 

Robert J. Landry 



The genius of American radio, and worthy of some admiration, 
lies in the fact that during 29 years of trial and error professional 
broadcasters have had a remarkable conditioning to large and small 
crises, big and little pressures. Hardy survival traits have been 
muscled up in the workaday chores, war-time and peace-time, of 
dealing with cranks, nuts, bigots, chiselers calamitv-howlers, states- 
men, brass, demagogues and earnest do-gooders. Radio men know 
with a special perspective how tides rise and fall, messiahs come and 
go, fads flare and fizzle. As for advertising sponsors, they and the 
broadcasters know all about each other like husbands and wives from 
living so long together. So if war comes, keep your powder dry 
and your channels open. 

It is fair to generalize that radio exhibits a fairly decent composure 
in the present trying times. Certainly it is far less lurid than a sec- 
tion of the press. Even the icky-sticky matter of "red-baiting" in 
radio ranks nothing like the hysteria of Hollywood has developed. 
True the entertainment unions are unhappy about loyalty ques- 
tionnaires at CBS. but that's a small thing compared to Hollywood 
procedures the past two years. 

* * * 

New York advertising agencies doing a volume business in tele- 
vision accounts face a space problem. Weintraub. within weeks of 
moving in, virginal, if that's the word, to 488 Madison had to con- 
tract for overflow space blocks away. Weintraub brags, of course, 
that it is second in TV billings. Benton & Bowles, Kudner, Y&R, 
and many other agencies have room problems due to the demands 
of television service. The single item of 16 mm movies used in TV 
commercials will suffice to point up the changes. Storage of film tins 
at midtown inflated rentals is no casual consideration. Add in fire 
hazards. To be truly foresighted an agency should store the master 
negative in one place, the lavenders made from the master in a sec- 
ond, and the actual working prints in still a third protected place. 
You make take it as sure that agencies will be looking around for a 
neater system than the present regimen of living out of tin cases. 

* * * 

Couple of Hollywood film producers conducted their own survey 
of what was wrong with the box office, found that a 15% loss of 
feminine patronage could be attributed to too many cruelty pictures. 
A bill of goods has been sold in recent years that nothing is so fas- 
cinating as good heaping measures of sadism. Let there be baby- 
faced killers. Let little moral monsters push innocent by-standers 
into cement mixers and then sic a private eye on their trail. The 
little moral monster will go on killing people every few hundred feet 
of film or every few minutes of radio. These homicides will be as 
pitiless as they are casual every time the dastard — or the author — 
caul get out of a corner. Euphemistic explanation for such fictioniz- 

l Please turn to page 85) 

SPONSOR 






Why you should 
use feature films 
in daytime spot 
television 




Larger audiences 

Many daytime feature films deliver audiences larger than 
nighttime local programming. For example: 

HATING 

In Philadelphia— WPTZ's Hollywood Playhouse 
(12:30-1:30 PM Monday-Friday) 16.6 s 

In Cleveland— WNBK's Stagecoach T healer 

(4-5:15 PM Saturday) 15.3* 

In Chicago— WNBQ's Matinee Playhouse 

(1-2 PM Monday-Friday) 8.9* 

'■'Latest American Research Bureau Rating 

More commercial impact 

Scheduling your commercials during a daytime feature film 
guarantees complete audience attention, unsurpassed impact 
on viewers. 

Increased product identification 

Many stations I notably WPTZ. Philadelphia. WNBQ, Chi- 
cago and WNBW, Washington) offer in addition to one- 
minute commercials, product and sponsor identifications in 
other portions of the feature films . . . all for the price of a 
one-minute announcement. 

Lowest cost 

Participations in daytime feature films are invariably lower 
l usually half the cost) of nighttime announcements. 

Where to buy 

The best place to start your television schedule in daytime 
feature film programs is on one or more of the stations 
represented by NBC Spot Sales. Call your NBC Spot Sales- 
man today and start reaping the benefits of television's most 
economical buy . . . Daytime Feature Films. 



WNBT 


New York 


WNBQ 


Chicago 


KNBH 


Hollywood 


WPTZ 


Philadelphia 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


WNBK 


Cleveland 


*WNBW 


Washington 


*WRGB 


Schenectady— Albany— Troy 



k Participations in Daytime Feature Films not currently available, but your 
NBC Spot Salesman /f</.s many other at tractile daytime availabilities. 



NBC SPOT SALES 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



CLEVELAND 



HOLLYWOOD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



29 JANUARY 1951 



" With a High Hooper, Associated Press News is a Major 
Factor in our Advertising and Selling Program." 



GENE L CAGLE, President, 
KFJZ, Fort Worth, Texas 



"All 38 of WMBD's Associated Press News Programs 
Have a Tremendous Listener Appeal." 



BROOKS WATSON, News Director, 
WMBD, Peoria, III. 




Whether by Hooper Rating or Share- of-Audience, AP news stands at the 
top. Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride . . . 



THIS STAT I OH H 




GEN £ L CAGIE 



BROOKS WATSON 



Share-of-Audience 



^z^t^y;^ KFJZ: 

market witlth ** ' W ° rfh 

Says H C V j 

de nt of' VonW VOOrf ' Pr es,- 

"" "els 0^7 Creamery: 

""'* and i c l hom °9enized 

^on-time Hoo P ^f\ *"* ° 
AP »e»scast s A ° b ° Ve 10 < 

Pectations" °* Wond e *. 




^0^^ Di — VVatson of 

" new, &W /0 "-cfec* 

e "ce ^oone/ Share -of-Audi- 

command 50°/ brOQ dcasfs 

** intend t/V hree mill '°<>- 

"ews /nder7 Je/y ""^ "** " 



Bfff OF r/Yf ASSOCIATED PRESS. 







AP newscasts are just 

about the greatest 

radio shows on earth 

because they star 

Presidents, kings, 

dictators, champions 

and just plain people. 

I f you are a 

sponsor who wants 

the best, switch your 

schedules to stations 

with AP news. 

I f you are a 

station that can 

qualify for AP 

membership, join the 

one news association 

that charges you only 

your exact share of 

the cost of the 

service provided. 

When you can have the 

best, why be 

satisfied with less? 



Associated Press 

resources and facilities 

include: 

A news report of 
1,000,000 words every 
24 hours. 

A staff of 7200 

augmented by 

staffs of member 

stations and newspapers 

—more than 100,000 men 

and women contributing to 

each day's report. 



Leased news wires of 
350,000 miles in the U. S. alone. 

The only state-by-state news 
circuits in existence. 

100 news bureaus in the U. S. — 

offices and news 

men around the world. 

A complete, nationwide 

election service, employing 

65,000 special workers. 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, WRITE 

RADIO DIVISION 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

50 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 



CASH FARM INCOME 

for WGTM's 

29-COUNTY 
COVERAGE AREA 
IS BIGGER THAN 
ANY ONE OF 27 
OTHER ENTIRE 
STATES. 



WRITE TODAY FOR 

"Time Buyers 
Market and 
Coverage Data" 

... a new, factual data 
folder on one of the 
Nation's richest 
Agricultural regions. 



WRITE, PHONE OR WIRE 



WGTM 



5,000 WATTS • CBS AFFILIATE 

WILSON, N. C. 

ALLEN WANNAMAKER, 
Gen'l Mgr. 




icaiiw 



la a R. Dowie 

Executive vice president, general manager 
Brewing Corporation of America, Cleveland 



Ian R. Dowie, executive vice president and general manager of the 
Brewing Corporation of America, is betting his money on horses to 
sell more of the company's Carling's Red Cap Ale. 

The company recently took a chunk of its $1,000,000 ad budget 
to buy MutuaPs Race of the Week, a 15-minute live sportscast from 
the Florida tracks. Similar to Mutual's successful baseball venture, 
Game of the Day, the broadcast is carried on 250 stations of the net- 
work. The company's 13- week contract marks its first use of net- 
work radio, stems among other things from a discovery by its adver- 
tising agency, Benton & Bowles, Inc., that horse racing drew a larger 
attendance last year than major league baseball. 

"This is a departure from the company's previous advertising 
policies," said the 44-year-old executive, a tall husky man, speaking 
with a typical British reserve. "We always have devoted a certain 
percentage of our advertising budget to radio, but have confined it 
to a spot basis. 

"In the past, we have devoted about 80% of our budget to other 
than the air media. We decided last year to overhaul our advertis- 
ing set-up, and appropriated more than half of it to radio and TV. 
We have a great deal of faith in sports as an entertaining vehicle." 

The company has continued its use of spot radio and TV, buys 
time in about 15 markets. It currently is considering use of network 
TV, and when plans materialize they'll probably involve sports. Car- 
ling's commercials, both transcribed and filmed, are jingles that tell 
the listener to "Graduate to Carling's — the light-hearted ale." 

Carling's is distributed in 44 states, and is affiliated with Canadian 
Breweries, Ltd.. in Toronto. Dowie, as operating head in America, 
runs the show here. 

He was born and educated in Scotland. A London drug manufac- 
turing concern sent him to their Canadian branch in 1930 where he 
remained for two years before he was sent to Central and South 
America to install plants for the company. Dowie ended up in 
Mexico City as manager for one of the plants, stayed there five years. 

In 1939, he returned to Canada and joined the Canadian counter- 
part of Carling's as an assistant sales manager for a subsidiary com- 
(Please turn to page 102) 



10 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 






*« 



EXCLUSIVE! 
OH %1M 



>i 



M Nagle- S P- ts " S " r for 
this red-Wot hockey town 
2 years and play V ^ 

"T-.W t once a 8 a,n 
^nUocUey-ans..^ 

colorful reportmg- 
T^ons earned the R^' 

rSK^V, Sure, it's Weal 

— - t t:t:^ Uhat wjbk was w 

«° s r°n 5 ; o fs neatest ch osen to °"S 1 ' hockey games. 

WJB t ^:^e seated the (ast-mov.ng Red W gponsors 

rtw --- :; And *. i-* - --^t adver t,se ** 

-T £££ * *• everywhere ^^^rernendous sales re- 
ol toft td W,n 8 ho.e in Detrmt. ™ e * au(J . ence can 

Detroit ._ nt a way 1 r , w/lRK SVaSt USiem«5 . 

«— ^r^ C " P S P° nSe0i J avertisin g dollar pay top sales 
8 rT* BKt-ds »6 out- m ake your adverting 

* u Wkey network. 
t he Stroh hocKey 



$JmI3 



>»' .'■' 



For the best radio buy in the wealthy Detroit market, check with your KATZ man. 

WJBKE« DETROIT 

The Station with a Million Friends 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 2 2, ELDORADO 5-2455 




Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



29 JANUARY 1951 



11 



what s 

hsi|3)>enec)l 



KB 



cores 



WK RG Sh»« o. Audience 



Pulse Gain Over 

.. npt HooP er 

Nov.-Dec- 9 .. 50 

1950 ,a,a 



Morning (Mon.-FrU 59 . 1<7o 



8 AM-12 Noon 

(Mon.-Fr'-> 



A f tc moon l«-» „% lli.'/« 

12 Noon-6 PM 

Evening (Sun.-SaO 41 . 5 % 

6 pM-10 PM 

12 Noon-6 PM 

Saturday Dayrime ^^ 25 .6% 

8 AM-6 PM 



n >MU>14UM<JI oSILi. 

in every period J 
Ip a four station market 



you can* make a better buy! 

national representative 

ADAM 1. YOUNG, JR. INC. 



ON THE DIAL 710 




New developments on SPONSOR stories 




sees "The ad manager's book shelf" 

Issue: 6 November 1950, p. 32 
NllOjeCt: Books for the advertising manager 



The new 1951 "Books for the Advertising and Marketing Man" 
has just been released. 

As sponsor mentioned in "The ad manager's book shelf." 6 No- 
vember 1950, this latest edition of the AFA bibliography on adver- 
tising, marketing, selling, and related subjects provides a compre- 
hensive cross-section of ad world literature. 

The publication has been printed twice before, once in 1935 and 
again in 1942, with a supplement issued in 1946. It is published by 
the Advertising Federation of America through its Bureau of Re- 
search and Education. The 40-page book, with 1,488 listings, is 
broken down into 57 different subject classifications. There are over 
50 listings for radio and TV alone. 

More than 500 of the books listed have been published within the 
past five years, bringing the bibliography completely up to date. 
This unusual number of new books in so short a time reflects the 
great increase of activity in the advertising, marketing, and selling 
fields since V-J Day, according to Olon G. Borton, president of the 
Advertising Federation of America. 

The bibliography contains index lists of the 328 publishers and 
1,168 authors represented. Books are listed under handy classifica- 
tions, with author's name, publisher, date of publication, number of 
pages, and price of each. 



»eej "Are vou in the middle of the research 

muddle?" 

Issue: 23 October 1950, p. 28 

SUDjeCi: Keeping your research thinking straight 



Advertisers can add to suggestions sponsor offered in "Are you in 
the middle of the research muddle?" 23 October 1950, the recently 
released "Standard Breakdowns for Population Data in Media and 
Market Survey." This is a joint recommendation for simplifying 
research presentations endorsed by the American Association of 
Advertising Agencies, American Marketing Association, and the As- 
sociation of National Advertisers. 

The A AAA Committee on Research undertook to study the. press- 
ing need for standard breakdowns of population data more than a 
year ago. The AMA Committee on Marketing Research Techniques, 
under Dr. Hans Zeisel of the Tea Bureau, Inc.. and the ANA Ad- 
vertising Research Steering Committee, under Richard H. Moulton 
of General Foods, contributed to the work. Richard L. Edsall of the 
James Thomas Chirurg Company in Boston handled the investiga- 
tory and liaison phases of the project. 

The recommended standard breakdowns cover: (1) age groups; 
(2) income, rental, and value of homes; (3) education; (4) occu- 
pation; (5) community size; (6) geographical regions. 

The breakdowns follow the basic data classifications used by the 
Bureau of the Census. With this as a basis, market and research or- 
ganizations can compare their surveys with census data; and com- 
pare private company surveys easily as well. 

In addition to individual research authorities, the following asso- 
ciations were consulted in developing the Standard Breakdowns: 
Advertising Research Foundation, Inc., Agricultural Publishers As- 
( Please turn to page 103) 




12 



SPONSOR 




ZIV's 

EXPLOSIVE 

NEW 

SHOW.... 








Uiey'll capture high, 
high ratings and a big, 
big audience for (jou! 




Together . . they're super-c 



IN ZIV'S THRILL -FILLED 
NEW HALF -HOUR 
ADVENTURE SERIES . 



"BOLC 



|» * ALL STAR DRAMATIC CAST * BRILLIANT SCRIPTS * THRI 



/ 



' 




, super-sensational ! 

ENTURE'i 



nut i- 



N * MUSICAL DIRECTION DAVID ROSE 

wmmmmmmmmm 



V» MAOISM tnZn ^W^ 

■""- 'ZL m, ""»< 6. OHIO 

Ho "rwooD 



Want to Sell 
To Ladies in 



60,000 TV Homes? 

"YOUR 
TV KITCHEN" 



A 



Newest and Finest 

HOMEMAKERS' SHOW 

in the Omaha Area 

2:30-3:00 P.M. Monday thru Fri- 
ojn. ITiis pari c -•."* ig show !$ 
the first TV homemakers' p-ogram 
of the dav in the Omaha area. 
Immeo ->•:• - follows popular 
Robert Q L«* s Sho« 

WHERE? 

Telecast direct from "YOUR TV 
KITCHEN. " KMTVs ultra-modem 
studio unit. 

WHO? 
Featuring two of the Midwest s 
most celebrated home economists: 
Verona Lame?- — Molt. V«ed.and 
Fri. Joan Kilty— Tues. and Thurs. 
Both are widely experienced in 
television, radio and supervision 
of public cooking schools. 

HON ? 

"*c r-c- :; •'. es' 3c:».a-*3ges *c 
adve -sers, KMTV offers 'YOUR 
TV KITCHES oa 3 participation 
basis Oarj S5- for full minute 
announcement « s ide or film) 
»•- ->? c • r • c c: - c * c " r-cc:"a~ 
>-c ;i*ra mentions when appro- 
priate. KMTV provides ac*-r 
— r - c~3 - ; sing support with let- 
'em rcs-ca-cs *o retailers, pro- 
motion »-- c. -cements, newspa- 
:;• 3c, ~< -;:;: ■; ;-c- ?; e'e 
W*. s c- S = : rcciage rate is 
fully cc — s? c-able. 

CH All tht- Fact? From 
Your K 1TZ Vnn 

\ •;,:/ RtprtSt-nlc.t.rr > 

KIT1TV 

TELEVISION CENTER 

2615 Fornam Street 
Omaha 2, Nebraska 
CES • ABC 




<ffi 



If 



iud i son 



PULSE IN WORCESTER 

Noticed a question about the Pulse 
cities in the 1 January issue. 

\:.d to m\ horror — Oh, you cad, 
sir!— Worcester was not included. 

So. would you add the name of our 
fair city, to your Pulse Citj list: \nd. 
not because I'm a publicity man (oh, 
no!) but just as a suggestion, if you 
could possibly mention this ghastly 
omission in some forthcoming issue, 
we'd be awfully happy up here in "The 
Heart of the Commonwealth." 

Andrew C. Fuller 

Pu blicitx-Prom otion Director 

WT !(• 

IT orcester 



WANTED: JINGLEERS 

I would appreciate it very much if 
you would send me names of several 
writers specializing in jingles for radio 
and TV. 

I would also appreciate the names 
of several production firms which do 
short TV movie commercials. 

J. C. Fitzpatrick 

President 

Fitzpatrick Brothers 

Chicago 

• SPONSOR ha< complied »ith reader Fitrpal. 
rick's request. Names of *inarin£ commercial 
writer? are available on reque-1. 



PIED PIPER HAS FOLLOWING 

May I take this opportunity of 
thanking you for the wonderful story 
about D-C America's Pied Piper." 

in the 1 January issue. 

I have received numerous comments 
both by letter and telephone. The ar- 
ticle was very well written and. from 
, all indications, very well received. 

Harry A. Friedenberg 

President 

Mar tree Advertising 

Chicaeo 



BANKS ON THE AIR 

Mr. Edmund Rogers, senior partner 
of the agencv here and head of our 
Radio and Television Department 
called mv attention to the interesting 



and informative roundup in your 6 
November issue <>n the use being made 

of T\ b\ banks throughout the coun- 
try. The piece nudged me into a rath- 
er belated awareness that perhaps we 
should have had more to sa\ out of 
this department about a fine TV 
program which Fidelity -Philadelphia 
[rust Company is sponsoring ovei 
W PTZ. Had you known of it. perhaps 
you might have wished to include it 
in your roundup. 

The program, weekly at 10:30 p.m. 
Sunday, called Great Music, is heard 
and seen o\ er W PTZ. Channel 3. While 
the program began only recently on 17 
September, it has a Pulse rating of 9. 
A quiz show. Stump the Artist, com- 
petitive in the 10:30 p.m. spot and 
which has been on the air for two 
\ears. has a Pulse rating of 9.5. 

Great Music features Guv Marriner. 
critic and musician of wide note, as 
music interpreter, and Columbia Broad- 
casting System sound films of world- 
famous orchestras. This show is un- 
broken by commercials. Sample pro- 
grams are: the Tchaikovsky Fourth 
Symphony i third and fourth move- 
ments ' . by the \ ienna Philharmonic 
orchestra and the Unfinished Sympho- 
ny ' first movement ' of Schubert, also 
by the \ ienna Philharmonic. Before 
the music on this program. Marriner. 
using a piano to illustrate his points, 
analyzes the movements to be heard 
and spices his commentary with bright 
scraps of history and legend. 

This program has been a new expe- 
rience in fine music for a vast audi- 
ence in the Philadelphia area. The T\ 
station, and Franklin Institute, where 
Marriner is director of music, and the 
L Diversity of Pennsylvania, where he 
is music lecturer, have been flooded 
with letters, all complimentary, and 
many of the rave nature. 

Franklin P. Jones 
Director of Publicity 
Gray & Rogers 
Philadelphia 



COMMENTS FROM CANADA 

I shall now hope to complete my 
library of books pertaining to advertis- 
ing from the list so kindly compiled 
for me based on one of sponsor's arti- 
cles. 

In my estimation. SPONSOR is the 
finest publication serving the radio in- 
dustry", and I know that a great deal 
• Please turn to page 



"£ 



SPONSOR 



New and reneu 




29 JANUARY 1951 



J. New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



B. T. Babbitt Co 


William H. Weintraub 


ABC l\ 




Ronafide Mills Inc 


Gibraltar 


CBS-TV 




Coro Inc 


Charles Jay 


CBS-TV 




Derby Foods Inc 


Needham Louis & 
Brorby 


NBC-TV 




General Motors Corp 


D. P. Brother 


CBS-TV 




(Oldsmobile div) 








General Shoe Corp 


Anderson & Cairns 


ABC-TV 




(Edgewood Shoe Co 








div) 








Hollywood Candy Co 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


CBS-TV 




Kellogg Co 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


NBC-TV 




Maiden Form Brassiere Co 


William H. Weintraub 


ABC-TV 


60 


Mutual Benefit, Health & 


Bozell & Jacobs 


NBC-TV 




Accident Association of 








Omaha 








Procter & Gamble Co 


Compton 


CBS-TV 




Quaker Oats Co 


Price, Robinson & 
Frank 


CBS-TV 




RoseBeld Packing Co 


Guild, Bascom & 
Bonfigll 


DuMont 




Sam Smith Shoe Corp 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC-TV 


16 


C. A. Swanson & Sons 


Tat ham -Laird 


ABC-TV 


53 


United States Army & 


Grant 


ABC-TV 


23 



United States Air Force 



Two Girls Named Smith; Sat 12-12:30 pm; 20 

Jan; 52 wk- 
Unnamed; Sun ll:30-noon; 28 Jan; 32 wks 
Vanity Fair: Th 4:30-3 pm ; 30 Jan; 13 »k- 
The Magic Slate; Sun 5:30-6 pm ; 21 Jan; alt 

»k- 
Sam Levenson Show; Sat 7-7:30 pm; 27 Jan; 

52 wks 
Going Places with Belt) Hel/; In 7:15-30 pm ; 

20 Feh: 52 wk- 

Ij'nnamed ; Sat ll:30-noon; 27 Jan; 52 v- k - 

Victor Borge Show; 7-7:30 pm; 3 Feb 

Faith Baldwin Theatre of Romance; alt Sat 11- 

11:30 am; 20 Jan; 52 wks 
On the Line with Bob Considine; Sat 5 : 15-6 

pm ; 20 Jan 

Garry Moore Show: M-F 2-2:13 pm ; 29 Jan: 

52 wks 
Garry Moore Show; T, Th 2:15-30 pm; 16 Jan; 

52 wks 
Yon Asked For It; F 8:30-9 pm; 19 Jan; 52 

wks 
Al Gannaway's Half-Pint Party; W. F, 4:45-5 

pm; 14 Feb; 52 wks 
Ted Mack's Family Hour: alt Sun 6-6:30 pm; 

25 Feb; 53 wks 
Roller Derby; Th 10-10:30 pm ; 18 Jan; 13 

wks 



2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Bonafide Mills Inc Gibraltar 

Landers, Frary & Clark Goold & Tierney 



NBC-TV 35 
DuMont 23 



Bonnie Maid Versatile Varieties; F 9-9:30 pm; 

26 Jan; 13 wks 
Universal Homemaking; Th 2-2:15 pm ; 1 Feb; 

52 wks 



3. Station Representation Changes 



STATION 


AFFILIATION 


KCJB, Minot, N. D. 


CBS 


KSJB, Jamestown, N. D. 


CBS 


KTTV, Los Angeles 


CBS 


WHUM, Reading, Pa. 


CBS 


WIBG, Philadelphia 


Independent 


WIKK, Erie, Pa. 


ABC 


WJMR, WRCM-FM, New Orleans 


Independent 


WORL, Boston 


Independent 


WSDC, Marine City, Mich. 


Independent 


WSOC, Charlotte, N. C. 


NBC 


WWNC, Asheville, N. C. 


CBS-MBS 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Weed & Co, N.Y. 

Weed & Co. N.Y. 

Blair-TV. N.Y. 

H-R Representatives, N.Y. I . II 1 Feb) 

Radio Representatives, N.Y'. 

H-R Representatives, N.Y. (eff 2 Feb) 

Independent Network Sales, N.Y. 

Boiling Co, N.Y. 

Hil F. Best, N.Y. 

H-R Representatives, N.Y. (eff 2 Feb) 

H-R Representatives, N.Y. (eff 3 Feb) 



4. New and Reneived Spot Television 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY NET OR STATION 




PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


American Chicle Co 


Badger and Browning & WCAU-TV, Phila. 
Hersey 


1- 


inin annrmt; 22 Jan; 22 wks (n) 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, New National Spot Radio Business, National 
Broadcast Sales Executive Changes, Sponsor Personnel Changes, New Agency Appointments 








All men listed below 
head firms new on 
TV (category I ): 

Coro's Rosenberger 
Bonafide's Spector 
Gen. Shoe's Bowers 
Maiden Form's 

Coleman 
Mutual's SkuW 



iVeu? and renew 29 January 1951 



4. New and Renewed Spot Television ( continued) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Celanese Corporation of 
America 

Ct'lancst' Corporation of 

America 

Colgate-Palmolive- Pee t 

Inc 
Duff>-Mott Co Inc 
John II. Dulany & Son 

Inc 
Grove Laboratories Inc 
Grove Laboratories Inc 
M. Manischew itz Co 
Philip Morris & Co 
Sunshine Biscuit* Inc 



Ellington 

1 Ilium,. n 

Ted Bates 

Youn^ X Rubicam 

I 'tui. Cone & Belding 

Harry B. Cohen 

Harry B. Cohen 

A. B. Landau 

Biow 

Cunningham & Walsh 



WCAU-TV, Phila. 

WTOP-TV, Wash. 

WCBS-TV. N.Y. 

WTOP-TV, Wash. 
WTOP-TV, Wash. 

WTOP-TV. Wash, 
WCAU-TV, Phila. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
WCBS-TV, N.V. 



1-min anncmt ; 19 Jan: 13 wks (n) 

1-min anncmt ; 20 Feb ; 15 wks (n) 

1-min anncmt; 26 Jan; 31 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 1 Feb; 13 wks <r) 
8-sec anncmt; 16 Feb; 13 wks (r> 

1-min anncmt; 15 Jan; 7 wks (n) 
20-sec anncmt ; 17 Jan ; 7 wks (n) 
8-sec film; 27 Jan; 13 wks <n) 
1-min anncmt; 13 Jan; 11 wks (n) 
20-sec anncmt; 27 Jan (n) 




5. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



Robert Ballin 
Cordon Bennett 
Casper H. Billipp 
Edward A. Bod inc 
Bog ;ii i Carlaw 
Ray P. Clayberger 

J. Clifford Dillon 
Jose di Donato 
A. McKie Don nan 
Reed Drummond 
Robert R. Etienne 
Robert G. Everett 
Peter Finney 
Dexter E. Glunz 
Max Green 

Marjorie Green baum 
Kay Hervey 

Charles F. Huti hinson 
William A. Irwin 
Edith M . Knutsen 
Joseph Leopold 
A. W. Lewin 

Roger Lewis 
Joel McPheron 
Mark Martin 
Edward Mead 
Edward A. Merrill Jr 
Brice Metcalfe 
David Miller 
C. Burt Oliver 

Roy E. Phebus 
William L. Reiche 
Bill Reiche 

Arthur R. Roberts Jr 
Ralph Sadler 
Eldon E. Smith 
Albert E. Van Wagner 
Samuel P. Walker 
Richard D. Ward 
Sidney Matthew ^ i-i- 

Robert West 
Ward M. Willcox 
Stephen R. W 11 helm 

Ralph W. Williams 

Richard D. Wylly 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 







opy superv 
McCUnton & 



operations 



Foote, Cone & Belding, Hlywd., vp 
Strang & Prosser, Seattle, acct exec 
Benton & Bowles N.Y'., copywriter 
Bod inc. Beverly Hills, pres 
Foote, Cone & Belding, N.Y., 
Calkins & Holdcn, Carlock 

Smith. N.Y., dir 
SSC&B, N.V., vp 
Edward Petry, N.Y., dir natl 
Brisacher, Wheeler & Staff, S.F., vp 
Fuller X Smith & Ross, Chi., acct exec 
Dancer-Fit zgerald-Sam pie, N.Y., acct exec 
Price, Robinson & Frank, Chi., acct exec 
Kudner, N.Y., acct exec 

Danccr-F it zgerald-S ample, N.Y., copywriter 
A. W. Lewin Co, N.Y., partner 

Foote, Cone & Belding, N.V., copy superv 
Public Relations Research Service, Pittsb., 

acct exec 
Chambers & Wiswell, Boston, tp 
Dancer- Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y.. art dir 
Chri>tiansen, Chi., media dir 
Federal. N.Y., vp 
A. W. Lewin Co. N.V.. pariner 

Monroe Green thai Co, N.Y., acct exec 
Pan American Airways, N.Y., asst to vp 
Buchanan & Co, N.Y'., exec vp 
Benton & Bowles, N.Y ., tv com ml dept head 
Young & Rubicam, S.F., mgr 
Foote, Cone & Belding. Chi., exec 
Young & Rubicam, N.Y., legal counsel 
Foolc, Cone & Belding, N.Y., co-mgr Hous- 
ton office 
W. W. Lawrence & Co, Pittsb., adv mgr 
Federal, N.Y., copy supervisor 
Wf*.t inghouse Electric Corp. Pittsb., central 

publ div mgr 
Christiansen, Chi., creative dir 
John Mather Lupton Co, N.Y., vp, copy chief 
Young & Rubicam, L.A., mgr 
St. Georges & Keyes, N.Y., acct exec 
Young & Rubicam, N.Y., copywriter 
WHSC. Columbia, S. C. sis rep 
A. W. Lewin Co, N.Y., partner 

SSC&B, N.Y., head of art dept 

Thomas F. Conroy, San Antonio, exec vp 

Foote, Cone & Belding, N.Y., co-mgr Hous- 



,,((,, 



Willi 



& Saylor Inc, N.Y. 



Benton & Bowles, N.Y., copy group head 



J. Walter Thompson, N.Y., vp 

Spencer W. Curiiss, Seattle, acct exec 

Same, vp 

C. B. Juneau, L.A., exec 

Same, vp 

Owen & Chappcll, N.Y.. vp 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y., vp 
Robert W. Orr & Assoc, N.Y'., dir radio, t\ 
Same, L.A. office 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 

Erwin. Wasey & Co. N.Y,, acct exec 
Same, vp 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor Inc, N.Y., vp (firm mer- 
ger) 
Same, vp 
Wasser, Kay & Phillips, Pittsb., acct exec 

Same, dir, exec vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vj» 

SSC&B, N.Y., vp 

Lew in, Williams & Saylor Inc, IN.Y.. pres t firm 

merger) 
Same, vp 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N.Y'., acct exec 
Tracy-Locke Co, Dallas, acct exec 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 

Strauchen & McKim, Cine, copy dir 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 

Wasser, Kay & Phillips. Pittsb., acct exec 

Same, vp 

J. M. Mathcs. N.Y.. pub rel exec 

Same, vp 

Same, board dir 

Same, vp 

Horton-Noyc 1 -. Providence, acct exec 

MeCann-Erickson, N.Y,, vp 

Cox, Columbia, S. C, acct exec 

Lewin. Williams & Saylor Inc, N.Y., exec \p (firm 

merger) 
Same, vp 

Glenn, Ft. Worth, acct exec 
Same, vp 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor Inc, N.Y., board chair- 
man ffirm merger) 

Same, vp 






Numbers after names 
refer to category of 
listing on this page 

James H. Grove (4) 

David Miller 5) 

Joseph Leopold (5) 

Jose di Donato (5) 

tdward Mead (5) 



IOWA PEOPLE APPROVE 
RADIO'S COMMUNITY WORK 

Radio Regarded More Highly Than Any 
Other Influence Except Churches 



In order to determine what Iowa people think of the job 
radio is doing in this State, the 1950 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey* asked the following question of every adult in the 
9,110 Iowa families surveyed: 

"As you know, the schools, the newspapers, the 
local government, each has a different job to do. 
Around HERE, ivould you say the SCHOOLS are 
doing an excellent, good, fair or poor job? How 
about the NEWSPAPERS? The RADIO STATIONS? 
The LOCAL GOVERNMENT? The CHURCHES?' 9 

Replies on each institution or medium were recorded before 
asking about the next one. Here are the results: 



ADULT APPRAISAL OF SCHOOLS, NEWSPAPERS, RADIO, 

GOVERNMENT AND CHURCHES 



(Figures are weighted percentages of all questioned in radio-equipped homesf) 




100.0% 100.0% | 100.0% | 100.0% i 100.0% 



vFigures have been weighted to give correct influence to women and to men in urban, 
village and farm homes. 



Notice that except for churches, 
Iowa men and women believe that 
radio is doing the best job in their 
community. When Iowa families 
think of radio, they think of 
WHO more often than any other 
station because WHO is "heard 
regularly" by 72.8% of Iowa's 
radio homes in the daytime — 
by 72.5% at night. Hence their 
wholehearted approval is a testi- 
monial to WHO's outstanding 
programming ... its awareness 
of civic responsibility . . . and 
its ability to furnish Iowa listeners 
with finest radio service. 

Get all the facts about Iowa radio 
Ustening. Send for your free 
copy of the 1950 Iowa Radio 
Audience Survey, today! 

sfcThe 1950 Iowa Radio Audience Survey 
is the thirteenth annual study of radio 
listening habits in Iowa. It was con- 
ducted by Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita 
University and his staff. It is based 
on personal interviews with 9,110 
Iowa families and diary records kept 
by 930 Iowa families — all scientifi- 
cally selected from Iowa's cities, towns, 
villages and farms. It is a "must" for 
every advertising, sales or marketing 
man who is interested in radio in gen- 
eral and the Iowa market in particular. 

Willi® 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 




29 JANUARY 1951 



19 




with 




an incomparm 




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a great name in show business 
a great name in radio 
an all-time favorite of radio audiences 



s 




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prestige of this name is 



YOURS 



"The Wayne King Serenade" is a fully script T 
show, combining the music that has made Wa\ 
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millions of loyal customers for advertisers throu; 
out the nation. The program gives THESAURI) 
subscribers another exclusive musical packag 
teeming with sponsor-appeal and constantlv I 
freshed through additional THESAURUS relea 



^) recorded program services 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA RCA victor DIVISION 

New York Chicago Hollywood Atlanta Dallas 




YOUR hard -hitting sponsor- selling brochure 
YOUR complete audience -building promotion kit 
QfOUR convincing sales-clinching audition disc 



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YOUR SPONSOR gets product identification at the beginning and end of 
y program. Wayne King opens and closet, each show 
introduces featured artists. 

YOUR SPONSOR'S three full-length commercials are more effective 
use Wayne King introduces the local announcer on each broadcast. 

iOUR SPONSOR'S show and product are promoted with pre-broadcast 
"on-the-air" station breaks by Wayne King and featured artists. 



THESAURUS SALES DEPT. 

RCA Recorded Program Servico 

120 East 23rd Street, New York 1(1. N. Y. 

Send complete information on THESAURUS— with its basic libra- 
ry of over 5000 selections and 50 selections per month phi- i I ~ 
new sponsor-selling feature, "Til K \\ \1NK KINO SERENADE." 



NAME 

STATION OR VGENCY. 

ADDRESS 




22 



SPONSOR 




Ire .von getting the most 
out of pur news sponsorship? 




Some hot tips from 
experts that will help 
radio-news sponsors 



Caught up in the global 
war fever, broadcast adver- 
liners are rushing these days to buy 
radio news. 

That's to be expected. What isn't 
natural, though, is the mistakes many 
sponsors are making. In the stampede 
to get into the act, many are leaping 
before they're looking, snatching up 
newscasts and news commentaries in- 
discriminately. 

In fact, so hectic is the news time- 
buying rush that it's becoming increas- 
ingly difficult to buy choice news spots, 
both on the networks and individual 
stations. 

Just precisely how good a buy is 
radio news today? What outlets are 
available to would-be purchasers? How 
can the sponsor invest his money in 
news programs most profitably? 

sponsor passes along the answers 
after conducting a nationwide survey 
among top radio newsmen, wire serv- 
ice experts, radio stations and neo- 
phyte and veteran news sponsors. (A 
future sponsor survey may be dedicat- 
ed to television news, depending on 
how active buying becomes in that 
province.) 

There is. first of all, no doubt that 
the Korean crisis has stimulated the 
consumer demand for radio news. This 
appetite was sharpened to a razor edge 
during the last war. and the change in 
global temperature from hot to cold 
to sizzling has done little to dull that 
edge. 

Although the networks and local ra- 
dio stations spoke broadly of "a ter- 
rific increase in news listenership." 

A NBC's Tokyo correspondent scored scoop, 
,2 interviewed escaping Angus Ward and wife 




«v 




THREE NET NEWS SHOW TYPES: ABC'S WINCHELL, COMMENTARY; MUTUAL'S HOLLEY, ROUNDTABLE; CBS' MURROW, NEWSMAG 



SPONSOR found no exact national mea- 
surement had yet been made of the 
news audience since the Korean crisis 
broke last mid-June. Consequently, 
sponsor made an audience study of 
its own, based on network news pro- 
gram figures supplied by the A. C. 
Nielsen Co. 

The study showed that radio news 
listening had not been hypoed since 
the Korean crisis as much as expected. 
There was a sharp rise in news listen- 
ing over the period from 1 June, 1950 
to 1 August ( from about 3.7 to a rat- 
ing of about 4.6 ) . But after that, un- 
til the end of November. 1950 (the 
most recent Nielsen general sampling 
at sponsor's presstime) listening lev- 
elled off to an average of about 4.3. 

In fact, when the total average radio 
news listening per program during No- 
vember in other years was compared to 
that of November. 1950. the rating 



seems to have decreased. 

The figures run this way: Novem- 
ber. 1947—5.4; November. 1948— 
5.0; November, 1949 — 5.4; Novem- 
ber. 1950—4.8. 

But this does not mean that radio 
news listening has fallen off. It sug- 
gests, rather, that radio news listening 
is more widely spread out. Because 
radio stations have doubled and even 
tripled the number of their news pro- 
grams, a point of saturation has ap- 
parently been reached. Audiences, 
therefore, are selecting their programs 
rather than listening to them all. 

How eager are radio news audiences 
of this moment? It's a reasonable bet 
that interest is keener. After all, since 
last November, reports about the draft, 
taxation, mobilization and the fluctuat- 
ing Korean border, have probably add- 
ed to the import of radio news. 

Value of radio news is clearly re- 



ffoir to </W most out of news sponsorship 

DO: 



1. Use plenty of local and regional 
news. Thi local weather report is espe- 
cially important. 

-£. Try to use a "second voice" for the 
commercial (though some newscasters 
do a potent selling job themselves). 

3. Select a radio station that has an 
organized news bureau and a depend- 
able wire service. 

|. Buy a news period that's been on 
the air for some time, assuring an 
established audience. 

5. Rewrite wire news to fit personality 
and style of newscaster. 



DON'T: 



f. Don't present "commentary" in 
guise of straight news. If it's opinion, 
call it that. 

2. Don't buy a newscast a half-hour 
after a prior newscast. Listeners get 
oversaturated. 

»>. Don't tie in commercial with news 
items. Listeners' sensibilities will be 
offended. 

J. Avoid cuteness or gossip in com- 
mentary. Listeners prefer to respect 
their news analysts. 

5. Don't open newscast with main 
commercial. A headline summary at 
least should precede. 



vealed in a recent survey, "Radio news 
is bigger than you think,"' made by 
Pulse, Inc., for Free & Peters. 

Based on a study of 3,000 families 
in seven markets, it showed, among 
other things, that radio is preferred 
over all other media for news; that 
radio outranks newspapers by 38%, 
TV by 268% ; that sales of the product 
advertised on news shows were actual- 
I) 50' '< greater among listeners than 
among non-listeners. 

Of particular interest to sponsors 
was the break-down the study provided 
of kinds of listeners. Persons who lived 
more than 25 miles beyond the city 
limits, for example, had news ratings 
as much as 28% higher than city dwell- 
ers. Also pertinent was this analysis 
of the male-female news listeners per 
1.000 sets: 

Men Women 

Morning 87.4 85.4 

Noon 54.1 85.2 

Evening .. 78.9 92.7 

Late-evening 94.9 77.5 

The strong sales impact that news 
programs exert on adults — especially 
on women — has impelled many big- 
time advertisers to buy into radio 
news recently. One of the most dra- 
matic illustrations of the current trend 
to hop aboard the news bandwagon is 
B. T. Babbitt, for many years wedded 
to the afternoon "soap opera." Begin- 
ning 15 January, it launched what it 
called ''the largest schedule of news 
broadcasts ever sponsored by a lead- 
ing radio advertiser." It will spend 
over $1,000,000 a year to present five- 
minute news reports, titled The Bab-0 
Reporter and Glim Presents the News, 
five times daily every weekday morn- 



24 



SPONSOR 



ing and afternoon over 400 MBS sta- 
tions. 

To embark on a campaign of radio 
news, Babbitt dropped two soap operas 
— David Harum on NBC and Nona 
from Nowhere on CBS. Explains an 
official of William H. Weintraub, agen- 
cy handling the account: "It's simply 
that we made surveys and found that 
radio news of national and internation- 
al import would interest women nowa- 
days. They want a unique service of 
this kind." He pointed out, further, 
that Babbitt would make no attempt 
to inject a soap opera human interest 
note into the programs: "We want 
nothing 'soupy,' because we feel ma- 
ture women today want the hard, ob- 
jective facts." 

The thinking that has motivated oth- 
er sponsors to jump into radio news 
broadcasting runs from concern over 
the Korean crisis to the relatively low 
costs that news offers. Commented 
James MacVickar. Benton & Bowles ac- 
count executive for Norwich Pharma- 
cal Co.. which, beginning 4 February 
will bankroll a 5:25 to 5:30 p.m. seg- 
ment of the Bob Trout Sunday news 
over 166 NBC stations: "We dropped 
the daytime ABC radio show, Modern 
Romances, to go into news because we 
feel people are worried about world 
affairs. Besides, we feel that Sunday 
afternoon news time will give us a 
complete family audience." 

A similar attitude was expressed by 
Charles Sherman, radio advertising di- 
rector for Doubleday Book Publishing 
Company, which is picking up the tab 
for the Edwin C. Hill news commen- 
tary on Sundays, 11:15 to 11:30 p.m., 
on NBC: "Radio news, we feel, will 
give us our biggest adult audience. 
Ironically, we're virtually competing 
against ourselves. People have grown 
so alarmed by the war situation, they 
don't read books as much as they used 
to. But a news commentary may give 
them illumination ; even induce them 
to turn for further illumination to 
books." 

The low cost factor induced Miss M. 
A. Wagner, advertising manager for 
Dictograph Products Inc., to purchase 
a series of news programs on the Mu- 
tual network: "We'd already spon- 
sored news on WOR. and decided to 
splurge further. 

"Our past experience," she added, 
"proved to us that radio news provid- 
ed us with the widest audience at the 
lowest cost, as compared to the print- 
I Please turn to page 91) 




DOS i \i I i s »...l i.ohiion SIMPSON 

» er: 

Jim , \l,, II • '.mi 

Thursday 
*,„i 1 1 .,i ii r, !■ M 

:. i an ami '■< I 
how you ' 

Una i 
Gordon 




Simpson's Shell Service 

Your Ni,, < both I h il Dealer 
Michigan m Waur AugvaU ^^^ 




Merchandising by cards, window displays backs up commercial newscasts on WKZO, WFBM 




Skilled news staffs as at WOW ensure sponsor of full value, bigger listening audience 





Wire service correspondents like the AP's Don Whitehead at Seoul give stations best coverage 



29 JANUARY 1951 



25 



The Ilka-Seltzer story 






One discouraging experience in radio didn't keep 

Miles from medium which was to spur firm's rise 



PART TWO 

OF A TWO-PART STORY 



Schwerin research guides Miles 



over-all 




Shrewd application of Hooper, Nielsen and Schwerin 
audience research helped Miles Laboratories reach the 
top ranks in radio advertising. Typical example of this 
approach is the work Schwerin did in auditioning day- 
time serials for Miles. On the basis of tests like the 
one shown above "Hilltop House" was the show chosen 




Alka-Seltzer does not stop with the pre-testing of pro- 
grams. Analyzing the elements with the strongest appeal 
in the serial was the next step. Sixteen episodes over a 
year's period were examined. The sponsor, agency, pro- 
ducers and writers made changes and the audience 
approval score rose as shown in Schwerin chart above 



Commercial A 



Belief in Commercials Evaluated 


63% 




63% 


55% 


51 % 1 



Commercial B 



Commercial C 



Commercial D 



With the entertainment in top shape, Miles went to 
work on the commercials. Maximum belief in the ad- 
vertising message was a prime objective in the promo- 
tion of this remedy for headaches and other common 
ailments. Chart above shows how belief varies with 
commercial. Highest-rated approach was one put into use 



26 



The fabulously successful 
Miles Laboratories. Inc., 
now spending over $8,000,000 annual- 
ly in radio, almost passed up major 
use of the medium which was to be- 
come responsible in large measure for 
the company's growth to sales heights. 

Back in 1932, Miles tried radio twice 
on a short-term basis. The first time 
( with a WLS, Chicago, rural appeal 
show ) , sales results were excellent. The 
second time ( with two more elaborate 
regional network operations), nothing, 
or practically nothing, happened to the 
Miles sales curve. 

With this second experience burn- 
ing in memory and pocketbook. Miles 
executives were in no mood to finance 
a third radio venture when the Wade 
Advertising Agency in Chicago sug- 
gested sponsorship of one hour of the 
WLS National Barn Dance in Febru- 
ary. 1933. 

Wade, which had handled the first 
two radio ventures for Miles, and 
which had used the air profitably for 
other clients in the past, pitched hard 
for the Barn Dance. The show was then 
seven years old and had been packing 
in capacity crowds at the Eighth Street 
Theatre ("old hayloft" I in Chicago — 
despite the in-those-days-considerable 
75-cent admission charge. 

When the Miles advertising and 
sales departments joined with the agen- 
cy in pressing for the show, manage- 
ment agreed to a trial. It was one of 
those history-making, fortune-building 
decisions. And customer reaction was 
quick in showing that Miles had moved 
in the right advertising direction. 
Some 30,000 requests for a sample of 
Alka-Seltzer came in in response to an 
offer during the first four weeks of the 
series. 

By the middle of the summer the 
product was moving so well in the Chi- 



cago area that the program was ex- 
tended to Detroit and Pittsburgh by 
direct wire from WLS. Fourteen more 
stations were added in September, and 
eventually that number went to 95 sta- 
tions on NBC's Blue network. In 1940, 
the Barn Dance was switched to the 
Red network and extended to 133 sta- 
tions. 

As the consumer demand for the new 
drug burst out like water rushing 
through a broken dike, retailers began 
treating Miles salesmen like their best 
customers. Early in 1935, California 
druggists proposed an Alka-Seltzer 
week. Although no support was asked, 
the Elkhart, Ind., firm jumped into 
the campaign with 1.000 radio an- 
nouncements on all stations in the 
state. Special placards were hung in 
front of street cars in large cities. Win- 
dow displays, counter displays, and 
banners were installed in 3,000 out of 
34.000 retail stores in the state. 

Thousands of new customers were 
created in that one week. 

To back its radio efforts through- 
out the country. Miles put special de- 
tail men to work in every town where 
they used a station. Window trims, 
counter cards, and soda fountain dis- 
pensers were placed in as many loca- 
tions as the druggists would permit. 
First, make the retailers and the whole- 
salers conscious of the product and the 



On 16 January the advertising 
fraternity was saddened by the 
death of Walter Wade, president 
of the Wade Advertising Agency 
and son of its founder. Albert 
Wade. Walter Wade played a 
key role in the epic ratlio story 
of Miles Laboratories, told in 
this series. 



SPONSOR 



Repetitive impact: Miles' two dramat- 
ic features, "One Man's Family" and 
"Hilltop House," are 15-minute serials 
heard across the board. These shows also 
fit in with two other key policies in Miles 
radio thinking. Neither is a high budget 
program and each appeals to different 
segments of Miles mass market. "One 
Man's Family" is heard at 7:45 p.m. 
while "Hilltop House" is on at 3 p.m. 




'One Man's Family" appeals to all sex, age groups 



© Radio and Television Mirror 
Hilltop House," daytime serial, appeals to women 




Joe Kelly became prodigies' straight man Uncle Ezra got his "five watter" Curt Massey now has CBS show Templeton had Miles piano show 



Springboard for new shows: Several of 
the "Barn Dance" favorites moved on to 
other Miles programs. Joe Kelly puts 
the Quiz Kids through their paces. Alec 
Templeton and Uncle Ezra had programs 
built around their specialties. Ezra 
broadcast from his "powerful little five 
watter." Massey sings for Alka-Seltzer. 

Barn Dance Stars: Top notch talent 
attracted millions of radio listeners to 
the "National Barn Dance" every Sat- 
urday night. Amos V Andy blackfaced 
on the show as Sam 'n' Henry. The "Barn 
Dance" was longest on Miles schedule 
from 1933-1946. Its astounding success 
marked turning point in Miles air-history. 




5vrB 




Hoosier Hot Shots were top hillbilly talent Amos V Andy were early stars Autry was Barn Dance favorite 



advertising efforts to increase the de- 
mand for it. detail men were told. Then 
take the orders. 

Druggists' satisfaction was indicat- 
ed in a 1940 survey in Chicago. Re- 
tailers in that city rated Alka-Seltzer 
tops in consumer advertising, and 
chose it the item they liked best to sell. 

Alka-Seltzer 's success during the 
early years of the Barn Dance spon- 
sorship sold Miles president Charlie 
Beardsley and his associates on radio. 
The Barn, Dance provided a warm. 
folksy entertainment that attracted 
large numbers of intensely loyal listen- 
ers. In dollars and cents terms, Miles 
was reaching an audience at the lowest 
cost per thousand. 

The high calibre of the talent heard 
on the Barn Dance was largely respon- 
sible for its sales effectiveness. Among 



the prominent stars who were once 
on the Barn Dance are Gene Autry; 
The Quiz Kids' Joe Kelly; Curt 
Massey; Amos 'n' Andy, who black- 
faced on the show as Sam 'n' Henry; 
Alec Templeton. Templeton, the piano 
satirist who appeared on the show 
many times, was given his own pro- 
gram by Miles in 1939 over NBC. And. 
previously, the popularity of Uncle Ez- 
ra, good-natured cracker barrel philos- 
opher on the Barn Dance, became so 
firmly established that the sponsor had 
created a separate show for him. Uncle 
Ezra, played by Pat Barrett, broadcast 
from his "powerful little five-watter in 
the friendly city of Rosedale." After 
five years Miles dropped this show in 
1939 feeling that they were duplicat- 
ing the Barn Dance audience. 

With the Barn Dance as the Man O' 



War in their programing stable, Miles 
entered a number of other shows in 
the contest for expanded sales. Some 
were quickly disposed of and others 
carried the drug firm's colors for many 
seasons. A season of football broad- 
casts was sponsored on WOWO, Ft. 
Wayne, in 1939 and at that time Miles 
also tried a program titled Calling All 
Poets. Transcriptions were used in 
spot markets, including the serial 
Thank You, Stusia and the variety 
show Comedy Stars of Hollywood. 

The complex picture of new shows 
being added while others were dropped 
is a continuous phase of Miles pro- 
graming. The number of winners is 
attributed to the clese team work be- 
tween the Wade agency and such Miles 
officials as Charles S. Beardsley, now 
(Please turn to page 84) 



29 JANUARY 1951 



27 



A SPONSOR Debate: 



What really happened in Pittsburgh 



if 

The s 



Was the newspaper strike "costly to business" as 

claimed by the Bureau of Advertising of the AIWA? 



spot 



Pittsburgh's long newspaper strike in T950, last- 
ing from 2 October through 17 November, is now 
a hotly contested issue — one far removed from 
picket lines and labor conflicts. The shutdown of the steel 
citys newspapers has become regarded as a laboratory test 
in media effectiveness. 

The issue was raised when the Bureau of Advertising of 
the American Newspaper Publishers Association brought 
its considerable promotion and publicity facilities into 



action. Its large advertisements have been appearing in 
papers throughout the nation ; they describe the Pittsburgh 
test as conclusive evidence of a newspaper's importance to 
a community's economy, indirectly minimizing other media. 
SPONSOR, believing that all sides should be heard on this 
significant question for advertisers, has asked the Bureau 
of Advertising and the Broadcast Advertising Bureau to 
present their opposing points of view, sponsor publishes 
both without comment. You be the judge. 



Bureau of Advertising 
statement to Sponsor 



In the past few years, a half-dozen large American cities 
have found themselves completely without their daily news- 
papers for periods ranging from a few days to months. 

That these communities suffered severely in almost every 
phase of their daily lives was evident in each instance. 
However, not until last fall, when the three Pittsburgh 
newspapers were shut down for 47 days (2 October-17 
November), was a really comprehensive study made of 
how deeply such a condition affects both people and busi- 
ness. 

The most thorough investigation in Pittsburgh was the 
one made by the Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove advertising 
agency, which conducted interviews among 508 individu- 
als and dozens of business establishments in 22 retail lines, 
during the third and fourth weeks of the strike. 

This survey documented the fact — not a surprising one. 
in view of other cities' experience — that overwhelming ma- 
jorities of the people felt the loss of their newspapers keen- 
ly and learned to appreciate their value as never before. 

For the present purpose, however, our major concern 
is how the absence of newspapers directly affected Pitts- 
burgh's business. The effect was substantial, beyond any 
doubt, as many reliable sources of information testify. 

The Ketchum survey, for example, discloses: 

"Di'pm liiicnl si<iii\s: \llhough up over 1040 I when coal 
and steed strikes cut Pittsburgh purchasing power to the 



Broadcast Advertising Bureau 
statement to Sponsor 

Broadcasters everywhere were sympathetic with the prob- 
lems of Pittsburgh publishers during the recent newspaper 
strike in that city. The subsequent tactics of the newspaper 
industry in making capital of that event at the expense of 
other media has shocked and disturbed radio leaders. 
The hysterical tone of the newspapers' propaganda theme, 
"What happens when newspapers dont hit town," is built 
on a misleading combination of carefully selected figures. 
Large full-page ads purported to describe how "Pitts- 
burgh's experience proves once again that a city without 
newspapers is a city in the dark." Another bogey line, 
"Business, big and small, took a beating." 

Radio may not have the elaborate facilities of newspa- 
pers' Bureau of Advertising to present its case, but it does 
have a far more powerful weapon — the simple facts. And 
matching our truths against their fabrications, the news- 
papers' case collapses quickly. 

The key item in the newspaper advertising campaign is 
"Department store sales nosedive during newspaperless Oc- 
tober." A chart is used to show that the combined net 
sales of 10 Pittsburgh stores in October was down 8.0' , 
compared with 1948. Comparisons are made with that 
year since major coal and steel strikes in late 1949 made 
1950-1949 comparisons unfavorable. The Broadcast Ad- 
vertising Bureau will accept these years for comparison. 
No one questions that combined figure, but, just as there 



28 



SPONSOR 



Bureau of Advertising 

(continued) 

bone), seven of eight stores said (sales) were below ex- 
pectations. . . . The average (decrease) was slightly under 
12%. 

"Automobile dealers: . . . Percentages of decrease from 
5% to 70%. The average was 42%. 

"Beauty parlors and hair specialists : Five of seven firms 
reported business from 20% to 50% below expectations. 
The average was 32%. 

"Clothing retailers: Ten of 12 stores reported business 
below expectations. Seven of the 10 firms reported per- 
centages ranging from 10% to 50%. Average was 25%. 

"Drugs: Over-all decreases of 5% to 10% were re- 
ported. One promotional item was off a third in sales 
volume. 

"Entertainment: All firms have been below expectations. 
Firms depending upon 'name' bands and entertainers have 
suffered most. 

"Furniture stores: Downtown locations have been below 
expectations. They expected that business would suffer 
more if the strike continues. 

"Sports events: Those that hadn't had pre-strike promo- 
tion and advance sales had suffered as much as 50% in 
box office recipts." 

The best clue to the strike's effect, of course, is the per- 
formance of department stores, which constitute the largest 
single retail classification in newspaper advertising. The 
findings of the agency survey are confirmed by actual fig- 
ures for the period in question, as reported by the Bureau 
of Business Research of the University of Pittsburgh, which 
for many years has drawn month-by-month comparisons 
in this field from data submitted by the stores themselves. 

According to the University's Research Bureau, the Oc- 
tober sales of 10 key stores were 8.6% below the same 
month of 1948 — the latest comparable year, because of the 
major industrial strikes in the city in 1949. Figures from 
the same source showed department store business running 
ahead of 1948 in the several months preceding the news- 
paper strike: July, up 7.3%; August, up 9.5%; Septem- 
ber, up 1.9%. 

The Bureau's November "Pittsburgh Business Review" 
adds this comment : 

"Sales of Pittsburgh department stores were 4% higher 
in October than in September. The 4% increase from 
September to October compares with an average increase 
of 15% between the two months in the past 17 years." 

The testimony of the stores themselves, as stated in the 
first ads run after the strike, shows clearly its adverse 
effects : 

Kaufmann's: "These are amazing buys. You see, with- 
out newspaper we couldn't tell you about them. . . ." 

Spear's: "Due to the unprecedented lack of newspaper 
advertising, thousands of dollars worth of special pur- 
chases in furniture, rugs, bedding . . . are piled up in our 
stores and warehouses causing a serious overstocked con- 
dition." 

Of particular significance is the fact that stores — while 

sustaining losses estimated as high as 15% to 20% — were 

spending as much, or more, in substitute media as thev 

had been putting into newspapers. As stated by Depart- 

( Please turn to page 96 1 



Broadcasting Advertising Bureau 

(oontinued) 

is a lot more to the elk than his antlers, there is much more 
t© Pittsburgh business than the figures the Bureau of Ad- 
vertising has chosen to recognize. 

Let's break down that combined sales figure. Store A, 
the largest in town, had no decrease from 1948. Next in 
size, stores B and C increased sales over 1948; the fourth 
ranking retailer had the second largest day in its history 
during the period of the strike; the fifth said sales "were 
up to expectations"; the sixth was slightly below its 1948 
figures. The six top department stores used radio sched- 
ules ranging from extensive to irregular. The other four 
who did not use the medium at all or very little were the 
firms that took the actual beating. It is noteworthy that 
stores A, B, C, D, and E who used the most radio had sales 
increases or no decreases during the strike. 

Because they recognized radio's worth as a public me- 
dium three of Pittsburgh's department stores — all experi- 
enced radio advertisers — distributed some 380,000 radio 
logs each week to be sure that customers knew when their 
messages would be aired. 

The moral of these facts is that where radio is used 
consistently with skill and intelligence business continues 
to prosper. It must be clearly reoognized that none of the 
top retailers in this area utilized the full advertising bud- 
get allocated to newspapers in any other media during the 
strike. Despite the restriction on its full use, radio did an 
outstanding sales job at an exceptionally low cost. As 
Allen Wells, sales promotion manager, Kaufmann Depart- 
ment Stores, was quoted as saying in Women's Wear 
Daily, 11 January, 1950, "The net profit for the period 
was aided by savings in space, production (newspaper) 
costs." 

This statement and other reports from Pittsburgh point 
up the fact that stores' efforts in radio at that time did not 
anywhere near match their usual newspaper expenditures. 

Even more significant in appraising the Pittsburgh ex- 
perience is the picture on what happened when newspapers 
did hit town during the month of October. 1950 through- 
out the country. Again comparing October, 1950 with Oc- 
tober, 1948, Federal Reserve figures show that depart- 
ment store sales nationally dropped 6%. In other words, 
the Pittsburgh drop was part of a national trend, and the 
ANPA Bureau of Advertising claim becomes more ludi- 
crous. 

Looking at the sales activity of other retailers, the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh's Bureau of Business Research showed 
that women's and children's wear sales were up 11.5% 
over the preceding September. Men's wear sales were up 
11.5% over September. Drug sales gained 2.1% in the 
same period, while new car registration was up 16.8' < . 

It is not surprising, therefore, on the basis of these and 
similar increases that the highly respected Bureau of Busi- 
ness Research reached this conclusion in its 30 November, 
1950 bulletin : "Aside from the loss of pay of several thou- 
sand employees of newspapers, the strike had little effect 
on the total economy of the district." Payrolls were up 
3% and employment was up 1%. 

Business in Pittsburgh did not take a beating. Nor was 
it a city in the dark. 

Radio stations boosted the number of newscasts. Pitts- 
I Please turn to page 96) 



29 JANUARY 1951 



29 



NMaaanoaai 



tmfifjfiiwjrw— ■ 




MR. AND MRS. CARY GRANT STAR IN TWA'S NEW "MR. AND MRS. BLANDINGS." HALF-HOUR SHOW IS ON 61 NBC STATIONS 



TWA takes to the air 



With first airline-sponsored net show, plus spot 
campaign, firm is aviation's radio/TV bellwether 



over-ait 







TWA's Damon is pioneer at heart 

Ralph S. Damon, president of TWA, believes in both 
ad and aviation pioneering. At 53, he's been in avia- 
tion 32 years, helped develop famous Condor, world's 
first all-sleeper plane, and World War ll's P-47 Thun- 
derbolt fighter plane. Born in Franklin, N. H., he 
was graduated cum laude from Harvard; learned to 
fly in U.S. Army Air Corps in World War 1, later 
was president of Curtiss-Wright Airplane Company, 
Republic Aviation Company, American Airlines. 



30 



Pioneering pays off, wheth- 
er you're building an air- 
line, initiating a stepped-up schedule, 
or launching a major new flight into 
broadcast advertising. 

That, in a nutshell, is the philosophy 
responsible for the success of Trans 
World Airlines, Inc., the nation's old- 
est transcontinental airline, yet the 
most vigorous air advertising bell- 
wether among the big boys of the bil- 
lion-dollar aviation industry. 

Three trails blazed by TWA make 
its success story (a current annual 
gross of $104,000,000) worthy of study 
by national advertisers: 

1. Twenty-two years ago — on 7 
July, 1929 — TWA inaugurated avia- 
tion's first 48-hour, cross-country lux- 
ury passenger service. And even in 
those days it made sure there was plen- 
ty of accompanying advertising hoop- 
la. Those darlings of aviation. Charles 
A. Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart, 
were selected passengers aboard that 
historic New York-Los Angeles flight, 
and Mary Pickford and Gloria Swan- 
son were invited to christen the plane 

SPONSOR 




Numerals in map: number of stations per market carrying TWA announcements 

.Stations used during typical month: October 1950 



Albuquerque 

Amarillo 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 



KGGM, KOB 

KFDA, KLYN 

WCFL, WIND, WJJD 

WCKY, WCPO, WSAI 

WBNS, WCOL 

WHIO, WING 

WFBM, WIRE, WISH 

KCMO 



Louisville 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Phoenix 

Pittsburgh 

St. Louis 

San Francisco 



WAVE, WINN, WKLO 

WNEW 

WFIL, WPEN 

KOOL, KTAR 

WCAE, WWSW 

KWK 

KJBS, KFRC, KSFO 



Los Angeles KFAC, KFWB, KMPC, KNX Washington, DC. WINX, WRC, WWDC 



with bottles of grape juice. America 
paid attention. 

2. Four years ago — in January', 
1947, when TWA was almost $9,000.- 
000 in the red, as a result of aviation's 
post-war slump — it initiated the first 
intensive radio/TV announcement 
campaign by a major airline. Within 
three years, TWA was back in the 
black with a $3,700,000 profit, par- 
tially as a result of its broadcast ad- 
vertising. 

3. On 21 January — TWA announced 
that it had boosted its radio/TV adver- 
tising 150% and would be the first 



airline to sponsor a regular coast-to- 
coast radio show I Mr. and Mrs. Bland- 
ings, 5:30-6 p.m., Sunday on 61 sta- 
tions of NBC). 

In this article, sponsor will describe 
TWA's radio/TV announcement cam- 
paign, leading to its expansion into 
network advertising. What makes 
TWA's air trail-blazing all the more 
remarkable is studying it alongside the 
aviation industry's advertising record. 

Why? Because, though all airlines 
make their living in the air, most of 
them heretofore have been notorious 
for their reluctance to advertise heav- 



ily on the air. And it hasn't been for 
lack of cash, either. 

According to a study made by Avia- 
tion Week, 16 of the nation's 29 sched- 
uled domestic airlines grossed $523,- 
000,000 in 1950; 13 of the 23 inter- 
national airlines grossed $262,000,000; 
and 476 inter-state airlines grossed 
well over $27,000,000. (The non-sched- 
uled airlines, of which there are hun- 
dreds, probably took in over $200,- 
000.000 last year.) And not only are 
they grossing more money, but the 
airlines are fattening up on profits. 
(Please turn to page 86) 





afy£k£Q**4 




JON AND SONDRA STEELE 




Top Hollywood Talent 



for Local TV Budgets 




KING COLE WO 




PATRICIA MORISON 



HERB JEFFRIES 



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'*.?■'■ 



SNADER TELEscriptions 



WHAT THEY ARE Top-quality 
motion pictures of well-known sinking, 
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vision. Each act is complete in itself 
and runs for approximately 3 r 4 min- 
utes. Opening and close of each act is 
designed for easy integration into any 
length program, in combination with 
live announcer or master of ceremonies 
. . . and smooth interlacing of live or 
filmed commercials. 

HOW THEY ARE USED In preparing 
programs, each T\L\. riser i pi iun is used 
as though it were an individual "live" 
act. They may be programmed in 
either 5-minute. quarter-hour, half- 
hour, or one-hour program series. They 
are available for daily or weekly show- 
ings over 13. 26. .'19 and 52 week periods. 



HOW MANY AVAILABLE Approxi- 
mately 400 TEUEscrlptions are now 
available . . . and new numbers are be- 
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HOW ARE THEY PROGRAMMED 

Station or sponsor may build his own 
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for use with SNADER "TELEscriptions, 
including: 

HOLLYWOOD SPOTLIGHT REVUE 
TAKE ANOTHER LOOK 
BEHIND THE FOOTLIGHTS 
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HOLLYWOOD DIARY 

. . . and other great new program 
formats being added regularly ! 



DOZENS OF BIG-NAME STARS... 
MORE BEING ADDED EVERY WEEK! 



Patricia Morison 
Gale Storm 
Toni Arden 
June Christy 
The Pagans 
Cab Calloway & Orch. 
Charlie Barnet & Orch. 
Lionel Hampton & Orch. 
Count Basie & Orch. 
Miguelito Valdez 
Martha Davis 
The Starlighters 
Carlos Molinas 
Mitchell Choirboys 
The Harmonicats 
Cass County Boys 
Marina Koshetz 
Peggy Lee 
Mel Torme 
Tex Ritter 
Carl Ravazza 



Arthur Lee Simpkins 
Diana Lynn 
Wesley Tuttle & 

The Westerners 
Guadalajara Trio 
Red Ingle & His 

Natural Seven 
Page Cavanaugh Trio 
Nat "King" Cole 
Herb Jeffries 
Clark Dennis 
The Pied Pipers 
Merle Travis 
Frank Yankovtc & 

Polka Band 
Red Nichols & His 

5 Pennies 
The Skylarks 
and numerous 
dancing stars 
and groups 



Snader Telescriptions Sales I 

REUbtN B. KAUFMAN, P, >„.(.„i 

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AGENCIES, STATIONS, SPONSORS: 



32 



WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE OUR CHICAGO OFFICE 
FOR COMPLETE DETAILS! 



SPONSOR 




:* :v 



Daytime television will grow 
to greatness in 1951. Recog- 
nizing this major broadcast 
advertising trend, SPONSOR 
presents a 40-page section 
devoted to daytime TV. It in- 
cludes information on day- 
time TV's dimensions; costs; 
audience; local and network 
programing; station sign-on 
times; and daytime results. 
(See subject listings at right.) 



( SUBJECT 

Facts and 
Figures 


DESCRIPTION 

Questions and their answers summarizing daytime TV 
highlights, including predictions about the possibility of 
a daytime TV sellout, morning television on the networks 


PACE 

34 


TV Soap 
Opera 


An analysis of the problems of staging a soap opera five 
times a week on television. Procter & Gamble's venture 
calls for unprecedented sweat — plus plenty of cash 


38 


Spot 
/ Programing 


A roundup of programing trends at stations all over the 
country. Includes descriptions of typical cooking; shop- 
ping; audience participation; d.j.; and interview programs 


42 


Network 
Programing 


It's the network shows that help build peak audiences, 
put daytime television in the spotlight. This is what the 
networks are doing: program types and program outlook 


44 


Result 
Stories 


Two pages of capsuled result stories, covering products 
ranging from automatic pencils to nondescript maple balls 


48 


Time-on-Air 
Chart 


Includes time station goes on the air and signs off; sets- 
in-market figures; station representatives for all stations 


54 



29 JANUARY 1951 



33 



Daytime TV 



Daytime TV: 
fads and figures 



The basic fact about daytime television in 1951 is 
that it's here — and bigtime already. All the rest is 
commentary. But because the commentary, the facts 
and figures that fill in the outlines are always of prime 
importance in making advertising decisions, sponsor 
presents them herewith. In the columns at right, the 
highlights of what is probably 1951's most significant 
media trend have been summarized in question and 
answer style. More detailed analyses of various phases 
of daytime television appear on the pages that follow. 

Throughout, emphasis is on programing and trends 
in the hours up to 5:00 p.m. For daytime television, 
to most radio/TV executives, means programing de- 
signed for the housewife audience and on the air be- 
tween sun-up and the first appearance of the puppets, 
usually at 5:00 p.m. 

The climb of daytime television in 1951 follows 
the success of nighttime television in 1950. With the 
networks and local stations virtually sold out at night, 
advertisers are now anxious to know more about the 
possibilities of daytime. Many of the leading adver- 
tisers have already plunged in boldly. Procter & 
Gamble, for example, sponsors a daily soap opera 
and 15 minutes across the board of the Kate Smith 
show. During 1951, it is probable that many of the 
broadcast advertising leaders will buy into daytime 
television. And many companies which never used 
broadcast advertising before will go on the air for 
the first time via daytime television. 

The fact that there is any daytime television at all 
is a tribute to the power of the medium to influence 
set owners. Only a short time ago, skeptics said there 
would never be extensive daytime telecasting because 
housewives didn't have time enough during the day 
for more activity. Apparently, when there are Kate 
Smiths, Garry Moores, Johnny Olsens, and dozens of 
likeable if less known personalities sending good en- 
tertainment their way. the housewives find time. 

As the months go by in 1951, there will be more 
and more good programing exerting an attraction on 
the ladio. More soap operas, more big names, defter 
blending of entertainment and service are in the cards. 
And, day by day, more stations are expanding day- 
time schedules. Already, there are two stations on 
before 7:00 a.m. 



Dimensions 



34 



Q. How many stations are on the air before 6:00 
p.m.? 

A. As of 1 February, 1951, there were 107 sta- 
tions (out of 107) on the air before 6:00 p.m. 
on one or more days ( in most cases at least four 
days) per week. (For complete listing of sign- 
on and sign-off times of all 107 stations, see chart 
starting on page 54. ) 

Q. At what times during the day do these stations 
eome on the air? 

A. Among the 107 stations, the lineup of sign-on 

times is as follows: 

64 stations sign on before 12:00 noon 

32 sign on between 12:00 noon and 2:00 p.m. 

8 sign on between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. 

3 sign on between 4:00 and 6:00 p.m. 

Of the 64 television stations which sign on the 

air before 12:00 noon: 

2 stations sign on between 6:00 and 7:00 a.m. 

14 sign on between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. 

36 sign on between 9:00 and 11:00 a.m. 

12 sign on between 11:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon 

Q. How rapidly are stations expanding daytime pro- 
graming? 

A. If the rapid growth of daytime TV in recent 
months is an index, by next fall most stations will 
probably be on the air before noon. To get an 
idea of how rapid the daytime spurt has been, 
consider this. A survey of all TV stations in the 
spring of 1950, made by Batten, Barton, Dur- 
stine & Osborn, Inc., researchers, found that there 
were 75 stations on by 4:00 p.m. As of 1 Feb- 
ruary, a survey by sponsor indicates that there 
are 104 stations on the air before 4:00 p.m. 

Q. What are the networks doing in daytime TV? 

A. CBS, DTN, and NBC have regular sponsored 
week-day afternoon programing. Exclusive of 
the kids' block from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., CBS 
programs three and a half hours daily (from 
1:30 to 5:00 pm.). DTN has two hours of pro- 
graming for adults (from 12:00 noon to 2:00 
pm.). And NBC has two hours (from 3:00 to 
5:00 p.m.). Net work program types vary from 
cooking shows to variety hours, complete with 
production numbers. Already, the networks have 
sold the following number of quarter hours in 
daytime before 5:00, Monday through Sunday: 
CBS-TV, 48; NBC-TV, 44; DTN, 8. ABC has 
12 quarter hours sold Saturday and Sunda\ only. 

SPONSOR 






!>«!/ 



Audience 



q. 



How large is the daytime TV audience and when 
is the audience at a peak? 

A. That there is a substantial daytime audience 
is indicated by sets-in-use figures for various 
markets which frequently average 15 or above 
from sign-on to 6:00 p.m. 

In general, sets-in-use percentages increase as the 
hour grows later, reaching a peak after 5:00 p.m. 
But, like many another radio/TV generalization, 
this one must be approached with caution. One 
good show or several good shows in a market 
may make sets-in-use figures zoom, though the 
same time in other markets is a low-point. For 
example, in Cincinnati the sets-in-use figure for 
8:30 a.m. was 12.2 Monday-Friday (according 
to a 5-11 September survey by Videodex). But 
in other markets morning figures are much lower. 



Q. What are some daytime sets-in-use figures in rep- 
resentative television markets? 

A. Here are figures for a dozen markets, com- 
piled by The Pulse. These are Monday to Sun- 
day sets-in-use averages, from sign-on to 6:00 
p.m. 



c. 



New York 


Philadelphia 


Boston 


Oct, 15.2 


10.9 


9.9 


Nov 11.2 


12.7 


10.8 


Dec. 15.4 


12.8 


11.8 


Jan. 15.6 






Chicago 


( ' ntrinnati 


Washington,, D. 


Oct. 12.5 


14.5 


8.6 


Nov. 14.8 


15.3 


11.9 


Dec. 16.0 


15.0 


12.0 


Los Angeles 


Cleveland 


Dayton 


Oct. 13.2 


12.0 


13.0 


Nov. 13.2 


13.6 


12.2 


Dec. 12.8 


15.7 


12.1 


St. Louis 


Columbus 


San Francisco 


Oct. 12.7 


14.9 


10.3 


Nov. 14.2 


13.9 


11.7 


Dec. 14.4 


14.1 


12.8 



Q. What's the composition of the daytime audience 
by sex? 

A. Naturally enough, the bulk of the afternoon 
weekday viewers are women, until 5:00 p.m. 
when the largest part of the audience is made up 
of kids gaping at the puppets. 
American Research Bureau made an estimate on 
the basis of the daytime radio audience, came up 
with these figures {.New York, August 1950) : be- 
tween 12:00 noon and 5:00 p.m., 17% of viewers 
are men; 67% are women; 16% are children un- 
der 16. But between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m., 13% 
are men; l l 5 f ( are women; 72% are children 
under 16. As you would imagine, the picture 
changes on weekends when men are home from 
work; the percentage of men in the audience rises 
above or equal with women. 



Costs 



O. How do daytime television time costs compare 
with evening rates? 

A. For the hours before 6:00 p.m., the network 
charges 50%, of the evening time rate. In gen- 
eral, station daytime rates are also 50% of Class 
A evening time. But many stations put the 5:00 
to 6:00 p.m. hours (kid show time) in (lass B, 
charging at 75' , of prime evening time. 

Q. Are production costs lower in daytime television? 

A. Union scales do not provide for any differ- 
ential in wage scales for daytime as against eve- 
ning work by musicians, actors, or technicians. 
But production costs for most daytime programs 
are much lower than nighttime costs simply be- 
cause there are fewer frills. And the stars, un- 
less they are of the calibre of a Kate Smith, get 
much less than nighttime m.c.'s. 

Q. As more sponsors enter daytime programing, 
will competition for audience force costs up in 
the same kind of spiral that has characterized 
nighttime TV? 

A, Daytime radio remained low cost because of 
the nature of its programing. Similarly, the ba- 
sic daytime TV program types (cooking, shop- 
per, audience participation, and interview-va- 
riety) will keep their modest price tags. Short 
of having Hedy Lamarr mixing the biscuit bat- 
ter, you can't push a cooking show to the heights. 
Most sponsors won't pour funds into daytime tele- 
vision at anything like the evening rate because 
it can't attract proportionate audiences. 

Q. What's the price range for local participations? 

A. Varying with market and station, one-time 
participation rates run from as low as $25 for 
one minute on a one-time basis to $250 and be- 
yond. Examples: KPIX Kitchen, San Francisco, 
$35 per participation; In the Kitchen with Mary 
Landis, WBAL-TV, Baltimore, $50 for one 
minute; Margaret Aden Show, WCBS-TV, $200 
per one-time participation. 

Q. (-an network shows reach viewers at low cost at 
the present stage of daytime development? 

A. Homemaker's Exchange reaches 109 homes 
per dollar (November). Garry Moore Show 
reaches 211 women per dollar (December), ac- 
cording to CBS-TV; cost per thousand homes of 
Kate Smith Show is $1.76, and Bert Parks Show 
costs per thousand homes is $3.80 )both Decem- 
ber), according to NBC-TV. 



29 JANUARY 1951 



35 



Daytime TV 



■mp 



Commercials 



Q. Are sponsors allowed more commercial time per 
program in daytime television? 

A. Advertisers get up to 100% more time for 
commercials in daytime programs. But the extra 
allowance differs with the station and program. 
Here, to give you a general idea, are the com- 
mercial time allowances listed by WNBQ, Chi- 
cago, for daytime as compared with nighttime. 

(All except news programs win h are same day or night) 



Length 


nf Program 


Before 6 p.m. 


After 6 p.m. 


5 


minutes 


1 : 15 minutes 


1 :00 minutes 


10 




2:10 


2:00 


15 




3:00 


2:30 


20 




3:30 


2:40 


25 




4:00 


2:50 


30 




4:15 


3:00 


45 




5:45 


I ::n 


60 




7:00 


6:00 



Q. How does the commercial approach differ in day- 
time as compared with evening television? 

A. Selling is more personal, more frequently 
done live by the m.c. or star. There is more time 
for telling the complete product story. In addi- 
tion, it's easier to fit commercials into the show 
smoothly. Most daytime shows emphasize service 
subjects which bridge naturally into commercials. 



Sponsors 



Q. Who are some of the national advertisers already 
in network daytime television? 

A. Exclusive of the kid shows, network spon- 
sors include: Procter & Gamble, R. J. Reynolds, 
International Latex, General Mills, Hudson Pulp 
& Paper, General Food's, Hunt Foods, American 
Home Products, Premier Foods, Sterling Drug. 

Q. What's the trend heen in local television spon- 
sorship during the day? 

A. Most significant is the enthusiasm department 
stores have shown. Traditionally conservative 
about media other than newspapers, department 
stores use television for hard, day-by-day selling 
in almost every television market. One store puts 
40 r r of its budget into daytime TV, an unprece- 
dented proportion for any broadcast media. 
Other local sponsors include retailers, bottling 
plant-, bakers, jewelers — almost every kind of 
business. Many national advertisers are partici- 
pating in local shows and buying station breaks. 
Ipana. Gannon Towels, Wbeatena, Norwich Phar- 
macal 



are among daytime advertisers. 



Predictions 



36 



Q. How soon will daytime network television be 
sold out? 

A. sponsor predicts a virtual sellout for day- 
time network television by one year from the 
date of publication of this issue (29 January, 
1950). Pressure is already building up on ad- 
vertisers who have national distribution and want 
to clear a respectable number of stations. In the 
44 single-station markets, there's network time 
for only a dozen to two dozen afternoon program 
sponsors at most, with many of the time periods 
already sold or spoken for. 

O. Will network programing expand into the morn- 
ing hours? 

A. Yes. NBC, for one, has plans worked out for 
two hours of morning programing to begin in 
April, sponsor learned unofficially. Shows will 
probably include soap operas, and a woman's 
service program. CBS has plans, too, for ex- 
tension of its programing into morning hours. 

Q. Will the cutback in TV set production cramp de- 
velopment of daytime TV? 

A. Some. The enthusiasm of advertisers for pur- 
chases of time during the day grows with the 
number of sets in a market. For example, it's dif- 
ficult for a national advertiser to get enthused 
about daytime audiences in markets of under 
25,000 sets because then the daytime sets-in-use 
figures range only from 2,500 to 3,000 sets. But 
current production regulations are such that sets- 
in-market figures can continue to grow, even 
though more slowly. And in markets where there 
are high set totals the most important factor in 
increasing the daytime audience is programing 
rather than sets. 



Q. Will there be a rush of TV soap operas over 
the coming year? 

A. Several of the soap companies are planning 
to join Procter & Gamble in its noble efforts to 
convert the radio strip drama for TV. But soap 
company executives may put the brakes on once 
they realize the difficulties involved. P & G may 
be left to experiment alone until the bugs are 
ironed out. (For full-length story on the P & G 
venture, see page 38. ) 

One intrepid Eastern station is working on a 
completely local live soap opera, but plans are 
still up in the air. 
( More questions and answers on page 71 ) 

SPONSOR 









Daytime T\ 




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Get the Complete Facts 
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best foot forward, conducted 

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Stokely's laugh with the 
ladies is an audience participa- 
tion program sparked by pop- 
ular Bill Bryan. A top local 
radio show transplanted to TV. 



Foley's TV shopper did a ter- 
rific job in the bus strike emer- 
gency, and is now a daily fea- 
ture. "Shopper" Jane Grey and 
store personnel cover the store. 






TOP NETWORK SHOWS TOO: 

it Kate Smith + Gary Moore 



CHANNEL 2 HOUSTON 

F lRSt i« Rad, ° and Television 



Jack Harris, General Manager 

Represented Nationally by 
Edward Petry & Co. 



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TEARS REMAIN FIXTURE OF TV SOAP OPERA (NOTE SAD LASS ABOVE), BUT PROBLEMS AND PRODUCTION COSTS MULTIPLY 



Problems of a TV soap opera 

"First Hundred Years** may be hardest. P&G is finding' out 






J*dk JLtdfr **■■*&& J*L <* 

Show opens with view of hone model 




Daytime TV 



_ When the news spread along 
TrWP Manhattan VI Row thai 
II ™ Procter & Gamble was con- 
templating a five-a-week day- 
time strip drama on television, budget- 
wise gentry shook their heads over the 
tablecloths upon which they totted up 
the supposed totals. Rough guesses by 
stub pencil ran to $16,000, some even 
higher. This was calculated to disen- 
chant even the most rabid TV enthusi- 
ast, especially when contrasted with 
radio daytime serials priced around 
$2,50043,750. The accepted explana- 
tion on the street was that Procter & 
Gamble practiced a realistic form of 
knowing-by-doing and was willing to 
underwrite experiment. P&G. remem- 
ber, prides itself upon possessing in- 
timatelv detailed knowledge of enter- 
tainment sponsorship procedures. Suf- 
fice that other advertisers were pleased 
that P&G would put up the money and 
face the hazards for in the end they, 
as well as the Cincinnati soapmakers. 
would be able to judge what a televi- 
sion quarter-hour daytime strip entails. 

Weeks and months of preliminary 
conferencing took place at the Benton 
& Bowles agency before the P&G TV 
serial, on behalf of Tide, was launched 
over CBS on 45 stations. Negotiation 
of economies, the blue-printing of short- 
cuts, the engineering of rehearsal 
schedules all represented stark pioneer- 
ing. Cost was the black cloud over 
everything. Walter Craig, the Benton 
& Bowles program vice president, had 
one question which he repeated again 
and again, "how can we shave that?" 

No official information on costs has 
been given out. but sponsor believes 
that The First Hundred Years Wias 
brought in for around $11,000 a week, 
for production. If so. this is a real 
job of cutting, meshing, foreshorten- 
ing, telescoping. AND YET — is a day- 
time TV serial "worth'" that kind of 



money? Smart buyers, most of all 
P&G. will be asking the question. The 
full answer must wait six months, per- 
haps a year until the ultimate evalua- 
tion of audience popularity can be 
made. Serials, typically, build slowly, 
accumulating audience on the hook of 
habit. In radio the factor of audiem e 
loyalty has been highl\ significant so 
that for 20 years, and still today, se- 
rials have been reckoned good sponsor 
buys. Whether radio experience will 
be duplicated in video remains to be 
shown. To justify TV production costs, 
a TV serial must, presumably, do sub- 
stantially better than a radio serial. 
A key question is this: how much bet- 
ter than a radio serial must a TV se- 
rial be? Not until audience size and 
sales effect are measurable months 
hence can advertisers figure a correla- 
tion between impact and investment 
which is. of course, the nub of the 
sales management problem. I First 
Pulse rating of the show, for the week 
of 1 December, was 4.0 with a 42 ' , 
share of audience. This was for the 
first four days on the air. I 

The radio serial's appeal to adver- 
tisers has never been obscure. It was 
always and remains today an inexpen- 
sive way to buy housewife impact. Pro- 
duction processes were not only tried 
but trite. No agony of creativity was 
involved. There were standard serial 
authors with standard serial plots and 
there were standard leading ladies with 
standard emotions who wept, lamented 
and nobly sacrificed themselves on cue. 
The fact that an established radio se- 
rial could be rehearsed, bridged for 
music, cued for sound effects, timed to 
stop-watch and ready to go on the air 
after no more than 60 minutes of ac- 
tual in-studio preparations per daily 
episode spoke volumes for the assem- 
blv-line techniques. True, one adver- 
tiser usually got pretty much what an- 



other advertiser got, with a lew qualit) 
exceptions like Hilltop House which 
had superior writing, but this same- 
ness of output didn't disturb the mon- 
eybags since radio serials were usual- 
ly dependable commodities with a 
minimum of complication. 

It was fashionable for years in in- 
tellectual circles to spoof radio serials. 
I hat bothered an occasional - 1 «« «i i - ■ . i . 
or his wife, but mostly the critics" sporl 
was shrugged off. No doubt The Fu^i 
Hundred ) ears can also shrug off the 
same sort of satire although observers 
have pointed out. reasonably, that a 
serial costing S2.500 a week has a mar- 
gin of "artistic" tolerance not likeh to 
be accorded a serial costing $11,000. 
Which is just one more thing the pro- 
ducers of the P&G experiment have to 
worry about. 

Any daytime serial, radio or televi- 
sion, is bound to be conditioned in 
some measure by wear and tear. Writ- 
ers and directors, to say nothing of ac- 
tors and executives, all testify to the 
fatigue factor of doing a show : in epi- 
sodic form. This is sure to be far 
more taxing in TV with memorization 
added, plus scenery, plus costume-, 
plus make-up, plus 10 hours of dail) 
rehearsal instead of the bare one hour 
required for radio's once-over-lightly. 

In point here, but not generally re- 
ported outside the intimac) of Col- 
bee's Restaurant, directors of radio se- 
rials sometimes have difficulty main- 
taining professional discipline in the 
studios. This is because the tedium- 
tired actors rebel against the deadh 
sameness day after day. It is a con- 
vention of the radio serial — and seen 
anew in The First Hundred ) ears — 
that plot advances at snail's pace, the 
authors characteristically i 1 ) stating 
l2l restating and (3) saying it again 
for good measure. Script monotoin 
(Please turn to page 63) 



PROBLEM: Commercials must be staged just like rest of action PROBLEM: Memory may lag (Teleprompter is there in reserve) 



Y\ 






>u ifliinr TV 




When was 
the last 
time you 
spoke to 

a woman ? 



Daytime T\ 




Was it in the daytime when she was alone 

and could plan her day's shopping? 

Was it the time of day when she was open 

to your marketing suggestions? Did you tell 

your story in the morning or early afternoon, 

while shopping lists were tentative? . . . 

If you didn't, you can. Because more 

people watch WCAU-TV at 

this time of day 

than any other Philadelphia station*. 

Advertising impressions are shopping 
reminders, and Mrs. America is the 
household's daytime purchasing agent. 

Get to the buyer before she gets to 
the store. Remember, the best way to see 
that the lady carries your product out 
is to see that she carries it in — 
on her shopping list. 

*ARB 



WCAU-TV 




These advertisers use WCAU-TV now: 

ABBOTT'S DAIRIES, INC. 

AMERICAN CHICLE 

AMERICAN STORES 

BEAUMONT CO. (4-Way Cold Tablets) 

BIRDSEYE EROZEN FOODS 

BOOTH BEVERAGE CO. 

BOSCO 

CALIFORNIA LIMA BEANS 

CANNON MILLS. INC. (Sheet.) 

CHUNK-E-NUT 

E-Z STARCH 

FRANK & SEDER DEPARTMENT STORE 

HORN & HARDART RESTAURANTS & RETAIL SHOPS 

JOHN WANAMAKER DEPARTMENT STORE 

LIT BROTHERS DEPARTMENT STORE 

MONTCO COFFEE 

MY-T-FINE DESSERTS 

NATIONAL BAKERS. INC. (Hollywood Bread) 

PENNA. LAUNDRY CO. 

PICTSWEET FROZEN FOODS 

QUAKER OATS (Aunt Jemima) 

QUAKER SUGAR 

ROBERTS PACKING CO (Pork Products) 

SOS COMPANY 

SUNSHINE BISCUITS 

SWEL 

VICKS CHEMICAL CO. 

WHEATENA 



The Philadelphia Bulletin Television Station 

CBS affiliate 

Represented by Radio Sales 




Send for the brochure, 
"HOW BIG IS TELEVISION IN PHILADELPHIA?" 




~. Slutnitltttj: WHIO "World of Fashion" is 
typical of type found on almost all television stations 




In the fall of 1948. when WABD. New- 
York, launched an experimental week- 
day daytime schedule, pessimists out- 
numbered by far those who gave day- 
time TV much chance for success. 
Barely two and a half years later, the 
array of daytime program pictures ap- 
pearing on these pages indicate how 
w rong the pessimists were. For each 
of these pictures represents a program 
Ivpe which has become successful in 
pulling audience — and in selling goods. 
Programs on daytime television fall 
into 10-odd categories. But SI>()NSOR*s 



s'.udy of programing all over the coun- 
try suggests one important caution : 
what's labeled a cooking show in one 
market may differ radically from a 
cooking show in another. Daytime 
programing is so flexible that elements 
of any one of the program categories 
may be blended with another. And 
this is frequently an important consid- 
eration for the advertiser; adding in- 
terviews or entertainment to a service 
show may give it a better chance for a 
big audience; or it may not. depending 
upon the personalities involved. It 

SPONSOR 



IB 



3. IlllCrriPU?: Margaret Arlen, WCBS-TV, 
with Tommy Henrich. Arlen went from AM to TV 






r HAVE FUN 



1 


li - M 




1 




"fence Participation: wcau-tv 

Iram inside Lit Brothers department store 




5. Disk Jockey: "3 to Get Ready," WPTZ, 
is morning wake up counterpart of AM's musical clock 



H. Sports: I" summer, baseball ta..es over on 
manystatior.S knocking oufstricily wo -ion's prog re n'ng 



pays to study formats closely. 

These are the major programing sta- 
ples in local daytime TV: 

1. Cooking shows demonstrating 
recipes. 

2. Shopping shows featuring mer- 
chandise. 

3. Interview -sen ice shows, with 
guests interesting to women, plus 
homemaking tips. 

4. Audience participation shows 
with women as contestants. 

5. Disk jockey shows featuring rec- 
ords, chit-chat, interviews. 

6. Movies to appeal to housewives: 
and films I mainly Western I with a 
club tie-in designed to attract young- 
sters. 

7. Variety shows which are almost 
all entertainment. They differ from 
evening shows in that acts, continuity 
are slanted for a women's audience. 

8. News shows, though still minor, 
may develop with war's impetus. 

9. Sports are important in summer, 
with baseball replacing other program- 
ing on many local stations. 

In the majority of cases, these pro- 
gram types are sold to regional and 
national advertisers on a participating 
basis. Usually national sales fallow 
evidence of local success. The most 
important thing the national advertis- 
ers are learning from local sponsors is 
that it's often wise to let the show's 
m.c. handle the commercial. Even 
more than in radio, the personal, local- 
ly flavored touch comes across effec- 
tively in television. This is particular- 
ly true when the show is woman's ser- 
vice or cooking and the product is one 
women buy. It's as natural as baking 
a biscuit for the show's slar to switch 
from talking about cooking to a com- 
mercial for a flour product, or a food 
brand. 

It's probable that there will be plen- 
ty of availabilities throughout 1951 be- 
cause so few of the local shows are 

29 JANUARY 1951 



tied up by single sponsors. The sta- 
tions are playing it that waj for the 
extra revenue. But the best-rated shows 
and the adjacent station breaks are al- 
ready tightening up. Particularly in 
one-station markets, demand for some 
periods runs ahead of supply, a survey 
of station representatives indicates. 

Perhaps the best indication that day- 
time shows really sell is given by the 
attitude of local department stores. In 
most markets, department sores are al- 
ready using or are interested in hard- 
selling shopping shows. Since depart- 
ment store advertising must pay out 
immediately, the proof is there that 
when women see a product on televi- 
sion it frequently ends up on their 
shopping lists. 

The Cramer-Krasselt agency in Mil- 
waukee, which handles shopper shows 
for several Midwest department stores, 
including Schuster's Feminine View- 
point on WTMJ-TV. Milwaukee, told 
sponsor: "There is every indication 
that dollar results on shopper shows 
are averaging out as well as results 
with newspapers." 

This is high praise for a newcomer 
it; the media stable, particularly since 
most department stores have high 
newspaper discount rates and newspa- 
pers are established in the housewives" 
minds as the place to find featured de- 
partment store items. 

To get a broader picture of the suc- 
cess department stores and other ad- 
vertisers have had with daytime tele- 
vision, see the 14 daytime result stories 
which appear later in this section 
( pages 48. 50 I . And. for a more spe- 
cific look at what daytime programing 
is all about, capsule descriptions of 
programs at stations all over the coun- 
try appear below. Program descrip- 
tions are arranged in groupings by 
type and include costs where they have 
been made available. 

I Please turn to page 66) 



43 




7. Moi'ie Clllb; WCAU-TV "Ghost Riders" 
blends club, Westerns, gives kids reasons for looting 




U # Modes: WMAL matinee appeals to house- 
wives (2:00-3:00 pm). This type program high rating 




9. l%etV-Si KITV reports for housewives; trend is 
to listener interest in news due to Korea situation 




> .. • wi w-Vr iii-c-. «v,v v-- K)K -, > ..■••:•-.-. <».-.•. t onkititi: HoiMIMisMI Exch*ng« (CBS-TV) features recipes, home tips 





(work |irnitiiiiiiiii!> 




N 

k as - 

\ . 

- 



i 

ars ed an in 

. - - - 

_ 

_ . - . FOOMuTsS 

- 



rheir strategy : entertainment has more 
eal than huts no matter what the 
audience. Thus onh oO 1 ', of the Kate 
s s at calls for women's 

service material. \ndtheCorrj V. 
v v consists mainlj of interviews and 
\ arieft entertainment. 

Shows, however, arc complete!] 
slanted for a woman's audience, as a 
sponsor researcher who studied the 
subject can testify. For example, a re- 
cent interview on the Garry M 

nstiiuted what was practically 
arious romantic I r the 

ladies at home. The actor interviewed 
ss A his devotion to women with 
enthusiasm, rolling of eyes, and 
studio audience emit- 
ted : • squeals usualh associ- 
Prank S atra. The moral is 
its a completely different pro- 
.. . « \ - ::ives 
find on shows they see at night. 
- - - : nt in net- 
^ thus far has 
success 

NRC-TY >. It is 

as = Pecem- 

Kesea iu rating 

J J a cost pei ho — cs of 



KIP »H('U » ...v- ••. •' ,T*>~ SISC ZO* -".- CHUCIC* A&ON PLAYHOUSE NBC-7> CT^E ON 



5 .' " : *•' 




: : T S : C • 




\ ariety: 



- : ■: -.---. -■ 



Sunday Fn 



:ing to NBC-T\ . Thus 
the show has achieved double the rat- 
- of most daytime shows : and. 
while the budget set i record for day- 
time fare, it has achieved a low T\ 
e and talent for 
the program hits a grand total o: I 

-asily the biggest total 
38 in televisk 

The ACa/e Smith .>/jomt is designed 
to pro\ ide for the needs of both me- 
dium-budget advertisers and those who 
-eek across-the-board sponsorship. The 
first and last segments, therefore, are 
-old on a -trip basis, to Pi -am- 

hle '4:00 to 4:15 p.m. and Hunt 

r:45 to 5:00 pjn. . The i 
to 4:30 portion of the program is 
sponsored Monday through Friday, re- 
spectively by Corn Products Refining. 
Simmons Mattre--. J-:_- - L :: : . 
American Home Product. Jergens Lo- 
tion again. The 4:30 to 4:45 portion 
runs as follows : Chesebrough Manu- 
facturing. Corn Products Refining. 
Durkee. Minute Maid. Hazel Bishop 
lipstick. 

This, in summary, is what these 
sponsors get for their money: 

1. An average of three songs bv 
Kate Smith, done against simple back- 
drops. 



_ Three or more musical or musi- 
cal-vocal numbers some with extensive 
sets. 

3. Five minutes : ■ ews 
the program, bv Ted Collins. 

. . -.- ice featu 

including a fashion show and teer-;_ 
forum. 

The format of the A S A St 
combining straight entertainment with 
service subjects, is a departure from 
program types on the air previo_- 
this fall which included: homemal*. _ 
interview: and audience participation. 
These program types on the networks 
are similar, basically, to their local 
counterparts. Examples: Homemakers' 
- BS-TS . = show stress- 

ing recipes and food preparation: 
\ anity Fair CBS-T\ . an inter 
program, with former newspaperwom- 
an Dorothy Doan asking the questions: 
Rumpus Room DTN . an audience 
participation with stunts that are aH 
the tide imp. - 

A: the present stage of developr. 
CBS leads in number of programing 
hours, with shows on from 1 :30 to 

t-xclusive of the chile: 
block • . There are plans ai 1 1 »ush 
CBS programing back to morning 
hours, sponsor learned, but difficulty 



- 



-■ _ - i as "" 



XBC - 



- - 
abhr to 






Resc 



■-.- .-':-•:• _ N - ... '• it ".-: 

- 



s two hours - 
the day. running fron 

pjn. The network has nc 
its - hedule wh 
- 
and Man on the - 
show, wnk" 
proc_ 
- 

- 






inly has the . 

sior. VTABD 

mera out of a win- 

rna ^rd and 

- 

urn to :>— 72 



'.' - 



Audience Participation: Rumpus ^.zo- 



:'-. 



>t»tr ABC Block: *M 







rr 



uytime TV 




enters the televisio 

The time has come for a stabilizing force that will put the rapidly expanding 
television film program industry on a sound basis. Q flG^rV C O HI P Q fl y 



:- :: *^^: : - : v : .— : 
:■...■:.. 




vV 



\' 



UNITED 

TILEVISION 
PROGRAMS k 

has now been formed to achieve this goal. 






Stations, agencies and advertisers can selected and pre-tested for high audience 

now depend on UNITED for top quality ratings. Offered on a firm and equitable 

films made by reputable producers ex- price basis to all. With delivery of the full 

pressly for television. Films carefully number of films guaranteed per contract. 



/ 9 \ 

The future of top-flight TV programming is in film! (0 






% 






Daytime Tt 




m picture! 



To assure proper selling and distribution 

service to all levels of program buying, local as 

well as regional and national, UNITED has 

created this nation-wide organization employing 

the established, experienced facilities 

of THREE MAJOR COMPANIES 




The leadership of these three companies in their respective fields 
is widely recognized. They were pioneer factors in bringing sta- 
bility into the radio time and program field. They were chosen to 
represent UNITED because their combined experience, resources 
and manpower offer TV program buyers a service now unequaled 
in television — all from one central, dependable source. 



For further information on availabilities of "Fireside Theater'* 
and other current offerings, get in touch with 

UNITED TELEVISION PROGRAMS, inc. 

360 N Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, III • 488 Madison Avenue. Mew York 22. NY. 

8619 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 46. Calif or colt ony Retry or Standard Office in Chicago. 

New York, Detroit. St Louis, Dallas. Oklahoma City, lot Angeles, San Francisco 



of the top-drawer producers 
to ally themselves 
exclusively with UNITED 

BING CROSBY 

ENTERPRISES 

whose film properties include 



THEATER 



The £m nd highest rated TV show by current 
surveys. Here is the only show among the 
top ten which can now be bought on film for 
regional and local re-showings. Other Crosby 
programs now in the making include 
"Night Editor" with Hal Burdick, and a 
rollicking series of chimpanzee comedies 
without equal for universal appeal. 

Watch for important announcements of 
other leading producers who have 
appointed United exclusive distributor 
for more outstanding film programs. 



DIETARY SUPPLEMENT 



SPONSOR: Vitrex AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Vitrex people pur- 
chased a $75 participation on Hollywood Studio Party. 
a 1:30-3:00 p.m. audience participation show. A special 
offer of a box of Vitrex for $3 or two boxes for $5 
brought a rapid response. The commercial, given around 
2:30 p.m., brought 173 orders for the product by the time 
tlie shoiv went off the air. For their $75 expenditure, 
the advertiser received a minimum return of $519. 



KTTV, Los Angeles 



PROGRAM: Hollywood Studio 
Party 




TV Results is a regular 
SPONSOR department appearing 
in alternate issues. It 

features eapsule ease histories 
of advertiser sueeesses with 
the medium. The 14 

result stories printed here differ 
from the usual TV Results 
page in only one respect: 
only daytime TV successes are noted 



ELECTRIC APPLIANCE 



SPONSOR: I). II. Holmes Co. Ltd. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This New Orleans depart- 
ment store sponsors At Holmes Show, Monday to Friday 
at 2:30 p.m. Westinghouse Electric Corporation took a 
poll ion of the show to demonstrate its $.'50.05 electric 
roaster. Since the TV advertising, thai department in the 
store shows a greater increase in sales of roasters and 
other appliances than ever before. The sponsor won't, re- 
lease actual figures but says sales gross is heavier than in 
prc-Christmas season. 

WDSU-TV, New Orleans PROGRAM: At Holmes Slww 



VAIIMM'S ITEMS 



SPONSOR: John Wanamaker 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Meet Me at the Eagle was 
the show — an hour-and-a-half, Monday to Friday. Fea- 
tured was a one-hour film plus a 15-minute live opening 
and closing "commercial" showing merchandise. Random 
results for the approximate $600 daily expenditure: 25 
items retailing between $1 and $28 on Columbus Day 
pulled in 657 phone orders. This doesnt include other 
types of orders traceable to TV. And, during second week 
of December, average daily sales numbered 300. 



WCAU-TV, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Meet Me at the 
Eagle 




SPONSOR: Gilchrist Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Gilchrist Company 
sold nylon shirts at a special TV price of $6.99. One an- 
nouncement at a cost of $110 was the pitch on Shopping 
Vues. an early afternoon show. The advertiser said 170 
sales were directly attributable to his video commercial: 
for the $110 time cost, a minimum return of close to 
$1,200. After a couple of individual announcements, Gil- 
christ noiv has a regular three-times-iveekly participation. 

WN AC-TV, Boston PROGRAM: Shopping Vues 



NEWSPAPER COLUMN 



SPONSOR: Seattle Post-Intelligencer 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The program is King's 
Queen, a woman's participation show televised from a ! 
special Hotpoint kitchen. A live participation for $70 j 
promoted the Prudence Penny column in the newspaper, i 
The offer: an apple slicer for 25c. On the first day, over 
600 requests were received for the slicer with requests i 
still corning in. Also, more women listeners are now fa- \ 
miliar with the name and column of Prudence Penny. 



KING-TV, Seattle 



PROGRAM: King's Queen 



CHILDREN'S CAPS 



SPONSOR: Sanger Brothers Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For $60 per show, Sanger 
Brothers Department Store launched Webster Wehfoot. 
M-F, 5:30-6:00 p.m. Featured is a store tie-in like a San- 
ger- Webster Web foot Club. Membership is obtained by 
picking up a certificate at the store. Merchandise is also 
tied in with the show. One-thousand-two-hundred Web- 
ster Wehfoot caps were sold the same day the offer was 
made on video. Other results: pleased parental goodwill 
and increased store traffic. 



WFAA-TV, Dallas 



PROGRAM: Webster Webfoot 



Daytime TV 




Se HER 



WDEL-TV 

sells your product in the 
nation's top market 

"Wilmington — first in income per 
family among all U. S. Metropolitan 
centers of 100,000 or over." 

Sales Management 2950 Buying Power Survey, 

"Delaware — first in retail store pur- 
chases; has highest per capita ex- 
penditure of any state." 

U.S. Census Bureau— July 2. 1950. 

WDEL-TV the only television station 
in Delaware. Its audience is growing 
by leaps and bounds. NBC and DuMont 
network shows, many popular local 
daytime and evening programs. Let 
WDEL-TV sell your product. 



Represented by 



"1 



\ 



WGAL-TV 

only station that reaches 
this rich market 



Lancaster, York, Lebanon, Read- 
ing, Harrisburg and adjacent areas 
in Pennsylvania. In addition to its 
ability to produce profitable sales for 
you, WGAL-TV is an ideal test station 
because it is the only station that 
reaches these extremely prosperous 
markets. Top shows from four net- 
works—NBC, ABC, CBS and DuMont. 
WGAL-TV is important in your TV 
sales planning. Write. 



ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES 

NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 
Steinman Stations • Clair R. McColIough, Gen. Mgr. 



29 JANUARY 1951 



49 



AUTOMATIC PENCILS 



SPONSOR: Watch Shop Jewelers VGENCY: R. C. Riebel 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Watch Shop offered in- 
expensive automatic pencils free. By using this TV offer, 
they hoped to increase traffic in their store during the 
pre-Xmas period. Six live announcements at a cost of 
$285 brought the following result: 4,000 inquiries which 
led to hundreds of watch and jewelry sales. For their 
1285 expenditure. Watch Shop reaped a gross of thou- 
sands of dollars and they now expect to buy a regular 
show. 



WAVE-TV, Louisville 



PROGR \M : Announcement 



FLOOR LIGHT 



SPONSOR: Lit Broih.-,- 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: One announcement on this 
department store's half-hour audience participation show. 
Lits Have Fun. sold some 700 lamps. One commercial 
featured a floor light retailing at $14.99. As a direct re- 
sult, about 500 of these were sold. In addition, 200-300 
other lamps went at about the same price. The one-time 
cost for the show' is approximately $270; gross sales 
amounted to close to $12,000. 



WCAU-TV, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Lits Have Fun 



SWAP SHOP 



i 



SPONSOR: Sustaining AGENCY: None 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A twice-weekly daytime TV 
program called the Swap Shop received an offer of 30,000 
four-inch maple balls for exchange. A WKRC-TV viewer 
had purchased the item from the War Assets Administra- 
tion four years before and couldn't get rid of them via 
newspaper ads and direct mail. But TV brought him 120 
offers of cash b\ telephone and telegraph and scores of 
swap deals. I' all included 5.000 letters; 3.400 phone calls 
and 500 telegrams. 



WKRC-TV, Cincinnati 



PROGRAM: Swap Shop 



COOKIES 



SPONSOR: Mama'- Cookies 



\<.K\C, ; DireJ 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: 77 is the sole advertising 
used by this baking firm. Originally, Mama's Cookies 
started with two participations weekly ($150) on the af- 
ternoon Pat n Johnny show. After one week, number of 
participations were increased to five. Then, after 12 par- 
ticipations, the company reported sales of their cookies 
increased from 35,000 boxes to over 165,000 boxes ( near- 
ly 5009f ) and demand is growing. 



WXYZ-TV, Detroit 



PROGR \\1: Pal "n Johnny 



- 



KITCHEN KNIFE SET 



SPONSOR: Home Test Products 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Art Lamb disk jockey 
show provided the video setting for this company's all- 
purpose set of kitchen knives which was being offered for 
$4.95. During the first week, 248 sets sold for a total of 
$1,227.60. After about 10 weeks of the offer, the com- 
any had amassed approximately $12,000 in orders for a 
total advertising expense of less than $2,000 on this Mon- 
day to Friday participation program. 



WTTG, Washington, D. C. 



PROGRAM: Art Lamb Show 



PLASTIC ORNAMENTS 



SPONSOR: Rabar Plastics Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: During the Christmas sea- 
son, this firm decided upon TV to sell a package of plas- 
tic Christmas tree ornaments. Homemakers Guide, an af- 
ternoon hobby demonstration-interview show, was the 
sales vehicle. The immediate sales result for the plastic 
ornaments, a $2.25 item, was a gross of $5,500. The com- 
pany reports that its advertising cost for selling one dol- 
lar's north of merchandise was less than 10c. 

WATV, Newark PROGRAM: Homemakers Guide 



WATCH IIEI'Allt 



M'llNMIII II,, Viatel..,.,'.., 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Window Shopping, a daily 
[r>-minulc participation show, carried an offer by The 
It atchman for a complete watch rejuvenation. The offer 
included a new case, new hands, new face and band, and 
complete repair for $9.95. Their daily $75 participation 
on this 5:15-5:30 p.m. show has brought in a weekly 
average of S 1. 00(1. ,,/ ,,n average of 200 watch repail 01 
ders weekly for an approximate $375 expenditure. 



WBKB-TV Chi igo 



I'liOCH \M Window sl„,p,„,,,' 



CUSTOM HAT SHOP 



SPONSOR: Robley Hat Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This custom hat shop de- 
cided to test TV on the last weekend in December. Two 
10-second announcements for $40 were used. A specific 
hat model not promoted in any other media was featured 
and resulted in 250 sales. A repeat test on the first week- 
end in January brought 60 more sales. Four IQ-second 
spots for about $80 resulted in the sale of over 300 hats. 
Sponsor says his business is up 25%. 



WSR-TV, Atlanta 



PROGRAM: Announcement- 



Daytime Tl 



WAVE-TV 

FIRS?. 

,H LOUISVILLE 
ON ALMOST 
BVERV COUMT! 



by 



more 



than 15 montbB, 



than 



HRST ON THE MR 

FW ln our third r ar! 

and now m »» ^ mor e 

«.T 1M PROGRAMME ente rtainmenl, 

tOp« 

and 

FIRST IN AU . b iue-chip V 

«nd growing * lSV 
a large ana g 

local and national. 



,thetopnotch S ho- 

fcaturmg Dum ont! 

_ISBC. AB<-an 



roven hy 
both 



choice- 



WAVE-TV 

EPRE SEMTATIVES 






FREE & 




MATIOMAL REI 



29 JANUARY 1951 



51 



A straight 
shooting 




Range Rider can't miss. This he-man hero is a 
dead-center choice as America's newest television 
cowboy star. As distinctly different a Western per- 
sonality as ever saved a maiden, a mortgage or the 
U.S. Mail, Range Rider towers a lean six feet four 
inches, wears fringed buckskin and moccasins 
(juvenile fashion editors, please note) and lives 
by his brain and his fists as well as his six-guns. 



And Range Rider's new series of 26 half-hour 
films— made especially for TV— has everything to 
rope and tie a huge audience . . . Hollywood featured 
players Jack Mahoney as Range Rider and Dick 
Jones as his sidekick, Dick West, the All- American 
Boy . . . hard-riding, hair-trigger action scripted 
by top movie writers... and the same production 
company (Gene Autry's Flying- A Pictures), the 
same camera techniques and same Sierra Madre 
locale that won critics' cheers for Gene's current 
TV series as one of the best of the year. 

Straight from the shoulder... here is one of the 
biggest bonanzas since Sutter's Mill for a fast- 
acting advertiser. Just completed, the Range Rider 
series is not yet identified with any sponsor or 
product. You can get into the act with exclusive 
first-run rights in your area (subject of course 
to prior sale). Your nearest Radio Sales repre- 
sentative will be pleased to arrange a command 
showing — even more pleased to discuss details 
and availabilities. 



RADIO SALES 

Radio and Television Stations Representative .. .CBS 

RADIO SALES TV PRODUCTIONS: Range Rider, World's Immortal 
Operas, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hollywood on the Line, 
Gene Autry Show, Strange Adventure. 




Anytime TV 



Daytime Vi : 



times ©/ SiijMn-i*Mi 

und Sign-off 

for W7 U.S. Stations 



There's no mistaking — daytime TV is expanding. 

In July, 1950, 18 stations signed on the air before 12:00 noo 
A close look at the chart below shows that of the 107 TV station 
64 stations now sign on the air before 12:00 noon on one or mo 
days per week; 32 stations sign on between 12:00 noon and 2: 
p.m.; eight stations sign on between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m 
three stations sign on the air between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m 

A few stations sign on the air at an early time, then go off f, 
a couple of hours and sign on again later in the day. WDSl-Tl 
New Orleans, as an example, signs on at 10:00 a.m. on Mond; 
\\ ith a newscast and signs off again at 10:15 a.m. WDSU-TV sip 
on again at 1:00 p.m. and ends the day at 12:00 midnight. 

(Breaks in programing are not indicated in chart below.) 

NOTE: The number of sets in markets is an NBC-TV estimal | 
as of 1 January 1951. Total number of sets is 10,549,500. 



CITY AND 
STATION 



NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 



HOURS ON THE AIR 



STATION 
REPS 



Albuquerque 



7,000 sets 



KOB-TV 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 5:15 pm-IO:30 pm 
DTN, NBC Mon, 5:30 pm-IO:30 pm 
Tue, 7:00 pm-IO:30 pm 
Wed, 7:00 pm- 10:45 pm 
Thu, 7:00 pm-IO:30 pm 
Fri, 6:30 pm-IO:30 pm 
Sat, 7:00 pm- 10:30 pm 



Ames 



33,700 sets 



WOi-TV 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:00 noon-ll:05 pm 
DTN, NBC Mon, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Tue, 1:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Wed, 1:30 pm — I 1:00 pm 
Thu, 1:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Fri, 1:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Sat, 2:00 pm-l 1:00 pm 



Weed 



Atlanta 




86,200 sets 




WAGA-TV 


CBS, DTN 


Sun, 2:00 pm- 11:15 pm 
Mon-Fri, 9:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Sat, 9:30 am-l2:05 am 


Katz 


WSB-TV 


ABC, NBC 


Sun, 12:10 pm-l 1 :55 pm 
Mon-Sat, 10:00 am-l2:05 am 


Petry 


Baltimore 




265,000 sets 




WBAL-TV 


NBC 


Sun, 1:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Mon-Sat, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 


Petry 



WAAM 



ABC, DTN Sun, I 1:55 am-l2:35 am 
Mon, 10:25 am-l 1:40 pm 
Tue, 10:25 am-l2:25 am 
Wed-Thu, 10:25 am-l2:05 am 
Fri, 10:25 am-l2:IO am 
Sat, 2:55 pm-!2:20 am 



Harrington, 
Righter & 
Parsons 



WMAR-TV CBS Sun, 1:00 pm-l:30 am 

Mon, 9:00 am-l2:30 am 
Tue, 1:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Wed, 12:15 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Thu, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 1:00 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Sat, 10:15 am-!2:l5 am 



Katz 



Binghamton 






31,300 sets 




WNBF-TV 


ABC 
DTN, 


CBS, 
NBC 


Sun, 2: 15 pm- 1 1 :05 pm 

Mon-Fri, 6:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 

Sat, 5:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 


Boiling 


Birmingham 






37,000 sets 




WAFM-TV 


ABC 


CBS 


Sun, 1:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Mon-Sat, 10:25 am-l2:l5 am 


Radio Sales 
(CBS) 



WBRC-TV 

Bloomington 
WTTV 



DTN, NBC [un, 1:00 pm I 1:00 pm 
k a .. c_: i .on i i i .i, 



[un, 

Mon-Fri, 1:30 pm-l I :00 pn 

Sat, 3:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 



(aymer 



13,100 sets 



Boston 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 2:00 pm-l 1:18 pm 
DTN, NBC Mon-Fri, 1:45 pm-l2:03 am 
Sat, 5: 15 pm- 1 1 :33 pm 



Meeker 



642,000 sets 



WNAC-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 1:00 P m-I2:l5 am 

DTN Mon-Fri, 10:00 am-l2:l5 am 

Sat, 1:00 pm-l2:l5 am 



Petry 



CITY AND 
STATION 


NETWORK 
AFFILIATION HOURS ON THE AIR 


STATION 
REPS 


WBZ-TV 


NBC Sun, 12:30 pm-l 1:40 pm 

Mon-Fri, 1:30 pm-l2:IO am 
Sat, 12:30 pm-l2:IO am 


NBC Sp ( 
Sales 


Buffalo 


171,000 sets 





WBEN-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:30 pm-l I :I5 pm 

DTN, NBC Mon, 12:00 noon-l 1:45 pm 
Tue, 12:00 noon-l 1:40 pm 
Wed-Thu, 12:00 noon- 1 1:30 pm 
Fri, I 1:30 am-l 1:30 pm 
Sat, 3:00 pm- 10:45 pm 



Charlotte 



50,400 sets 



WBTV ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:30 pm-l2:00 midnight Radio Sa 

DTN, NBC Mon-Tue, 1 :30 pm-l2:00 midnight (CBS) 
Wed-Thu, 12:45 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Fri, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 1:15 pm-l2:00 midnight 



Chicago 



830,000 sets 



WNBQ 



NBC Sun, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 

lidnight 



Mon-Fri, I 1:30 am-l2:00 m'._ 
Sat, 4:15 pm-l2:00 midnight 



WBKB 



CBS Sun, I 1:30 am-l2:IO am 

Mon-Tue, 10:00 am- 12: 15 am 
Wed, 10:00 am-l2:25 am 
Thu, 10:00 am-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 10:00 am-l2:25 am 
Sat, 10:00 am-l:40 am 



Weed 



WENR-TV 



ABC 



Sun-Sat, I 1:00 am-l 1:45 pm 



WGN-TV DTN Sun, I 1 :45 am-l 1:05 pm 

Mon-Fri, 10:00 am-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 4:00 pm-l:00 am 



Cincinnati 




220,000 sets 




WCPO-TV 


ABC, DTN 


Sun, 8:00 am-l 1:45 pm 
Mon-Fri, 7:00 am-l:30 am 
Sat, 7:00 am-2:05 am 


Branham ji 


WLW-T 


NBC 


Sun, 10:00 am-l 1:20 pm 
Mon-Fri, 7:30 am-l2:30 am 
Sat, 7:30 am-2:00 am 


Crosley 



WKRC-TV CBS Sun, 11:45 am-l2:l5 am 

Mon, 9:45 am-l2:l5 am 
Tue, 9:45 am-l2:30 am 
Wed, 9:45 am-l2:l5 am 
Thu, 9:45 am-l2:30 am 
Fri-Sat, 9:45 am-l2:l5 am 



Katz 



Cleveland 



396,000 sets 



WXEL 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:00 noon-l 1:30 pm 
DTN Mon, 12:30 pm-IO:l5 pm 

Tue, 12:30 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Wed, 12:30 pm-l2:30 am 
Thu, 12:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 12:30 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Sat, 9:30 am-l2:30 am 



Katz 



Please turn to page 56) 



TWO 
DAYTIME 

MOVIES 
DAILY 



Feature films are the most popular entertainment in Southern Cali- 
fornia's 900,000 TV homes — day or night. KFI-TV offers the daytime 
audienee more film features than any other station — one at 10:00 
A.M., another at 2:00 P.M. — and to advertisers, availahilities with 
huge audiences at low cost per 1000 families because these features 
are participating. PETRY TV has the story. 



KFI-TV 

Earle €. Anthony, Inc. 

C hannel 9 



Dallas 



Detroit 



WW J -TV 



WXYZ-TV 



Erie 



WICU 



Fort Worth 



WBAP-TV 



Daytime 


TV 




oi Sian-on rinrf Sign 




Day time 


TV 


: Times 


■off for 107 I 


CITY AND 
STATION 




NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 


HOURS ON THE AIR 


STATION 
REPS 


WNBK 




NBC 


Sun, 2:55 prn-l2:05 am 
Mon-Fri, 12:55 pm-l2:05 am 
Sat, 3:55 pm-l 1 :35 pm 


NBC Spot 
Sales 


WEWS 




ABC, CBS 


Sun, 10:45 ami :00 am 
Mon, 9:00 am-l:20 am 
Tue-Wed, 9:00 am-l:05 am 
Thu, 9:00 am-l2:35 am 
Fri, 9:00 am-l :35 am 
Sat, 10:00 am-l:00 am 


Branham 


Columbus 






120,000 sets 




WLW-C 




NBC 


Sun, 10:25 am- 1 1 :2 1 pm 
Mon-Fri, 7:30 am-l2:30 am 
Sat. 7:30 am-2:00 am 


Crosley 


WBNS-TV 




CBS 


Sun, 12:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Mon-Fri, 9:45 am- 11:40 pm 
Sat, 1:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 


Blair 


WTVN 




ABC, DTN 


Sun, 1 1:50 am-l2:20 am 
Mon-Tue, 11:50 am- 11:45 pm 
Wed, 1 1:50 am-l2:l5 am 


Headley- 
Reed 



Thu, I 1:50 am-!2:40 am 
Fri, I 1:50 am-l 1:45 pm 
Sat, I 1:50 am-l2:45 am 



56,500 sets 



KRLD-TV CBS Sun, 2:45 pm-IO:45 pm 

Mon, 2:15 pm-IO:IO pm 
Tue, 2:45 pm-IO:20 pm 
Wed-Thu, 2:45 pm-IO:IO pm 
Fri, 2:45 pm-IO:25 pm 
Sat, 5:30 pm-IO:25 pm 



Branham 



WFAA-TV 


ABC, DTN 
NBC, Para- 
mount 


Sun-Sat, 4:00 pm-IO:30 pm 


Petry 


Davenport 




38,500 sets 




WOC-TV 


NBC 


Sun, 1:15 pm-l 1 :00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 12:00 noon-!2:00 midnight 

Sat, 2:00 pm-l 1:00 pm 


Free & Peters 


Dayton 




107,000 sets 




WLW-D 


NBC 


Sun, 10:30 am-l 1:30 pm 
Mon-Fri 7:30 am-l2:30 am 
Sat, 7:30 am-2:00 am 


Crosley 



WHIO-TV ABC, CBS Sun, I 1 :45 am-l 1 :40 pm 

Mon-Thu, 9:50 am-l2:IO am 
Fri, 9:50 am-l2:45 am 
Sat, 8:30 am- 1:05 am 



Hollingbery 



405,000 sets 



NBC Sun, 12:30 pm-l2:45 am 

Mon-Fri, 11:15 am-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 2:15 pm-l2:45 am 



Hollingbery 



WJBK-TV CBS, DTN Sun, I 1 :25 am-l2:30 am 

Mon, 9:55 am-l : 15 am 
Tue-Fri, 9:55 am-l2:45 am 
Sat, 9:55 am-!2:00 midnight 



Katz 



ABC 



Sun-Sat, 6:45 am-l:00 am 



ABC Spot 
Sales 



40,100 sets 



ABC, CBS, Sun, I 1:55 am-l 1:30 pm 
DTN, NBC Mon, 11:55 am-l 1:40 pm 
Tue, I 1:55 am-l2:30 am 
Wed, I 1:55 am-l 1:40 pm 
Thu, I 1 :55 am-l 1 :55 pm 
Fri, I 1:55 am-l2:IO am 
Sat, 4:45 pm-l2:05 am 



Headley- 
Reed 



44,100 sets 



Grand Rapids 



ABC, NBC Sun, 2:45 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 12:45 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, I 1:00 am-l 1:30 pm 

70,000 sets 



Free & Peters 



WLAV-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 1:30 pm-l 1:55 pm 

DTN, NBC Mon, I 1:05 am-l2:30 am 
Tue-Fri, 12:50 pm-l2:30 ar 
Sat, 3:20 pm-l2:05 am 



S. Stations (continued) 



CITY AND 
STATION 


NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 


HOURS ON THE AIR 




STATION 
REPS 

1 " 


Greensboro 




42,000 sets 




1 


WFMY-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 1:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Mon-Fri, 1:30 pm-l2:00 
Sat, 3:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 


midnight 


Harrim|t< 
Righter 
Parsons i 


Houston 




59,300 sets 






KPRC-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 12:30 pm-l2:30 am 
Mon-Fri, 1:15 pm-l2:l5 
Sat, 3:30 pm-l2:45 am 


am 


Petry 


Huntington 




32,500 sets 







WSAZ-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, I :30 pm-3:30 pm Katz 

DTN, NBC Mon, 9:30 am-l 1:00 pm 

Tue-Fri, 2:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Sat, 2:15 pm-l 1:00 pm 



Indianapolis 



88,900 sets 



WFBM-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, I 1 :00 am-l2:30 am Katz 

NBC Mon, 11:15 am- 12:00 midnight 

Tue, 12:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Wed-Fri, l2:30-pm- 12:00 midnight 
Sat, 12:00 noon-l2:30 am 



Jacksonville 



26,000 sets 



WMBR-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:45 pm-l2:00 midnight 

DTN, NBC Mon-Fri, 1:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, I 1:00 am-l 1:30 pm 



Johnstown 



61,300 sets 



WDAF-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:25 pm-l 1:30 pm 

NBC Mon, 12:15 pm-l2:00 midnight 

Tue, 3:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Wed, 2:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Thu, 3:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Fri, 2:30 pm-IO:50 pm 
Sat, 1:15 pm-l 1:15 pm 



KTLA 



Sun, 10:30 am-l 1:00 pm 
Mon, 5:30 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Tue-Thu, 5:30 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Fri, 5:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 10:00 am -l 1:15 Dm 



KFI-TV 



KLAC-TV 



Sun, I 1:00 am-6:00 pm 
Mon-Fri, 9:00 am-IO:00 pm 
Sat, 10:30 am-7:30 pm 



Sun, 9:00 am-l 1:40 pm 
Mon-Thu, 9:00 am-l 1:15 pm 
Fri, 9:00 am-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 9:30 am-l2:05 am 



KTTV 



CBS Sun, 1:45 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 12:00 noon-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 3:45 pm- 1 1 :30 pm 



{Please turn to page 58) 



WJAC-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, I 1:20 am- 1. -30 am 

DTN, NBC Mon, I 1:55 am-l 1:45 pm 

Tue-Wed, 1:25 pm-l2:00 midnight 

Thu, 1:25 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Fri, 1:25 pm-l2:30 am 

Sat, 2:10 pm-l2:00 midnight 



Kalamazoo 




31,100 sets 




WKZO-TV 


CBS 


Sun, 4:00 pm-l 1:10 pm 
Mon-Fri, 1:30 pm-l 1:10 pm 
Sat, 2:00 pm-l2:25 am 


Avery-Krv 


Kansas City 




93,200 sets 





Lancaster 




76,500 sets 




' 


WGAL-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 
Mon-Fri, 1:45 pm-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 9:45 am-l2:l5 am 




Meelcer 


Lansing 




40,000 sets 






WJIM-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 4: 15 pm-l 1 :45 pm 

Mon-Fri, 5:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 

Sat, 5: 15 pm-l 1:15 pm 


H-R Rep 


Los Angeles 




801,000 sets 







Petry 



Katz 




' I 



VOWED MAIDA McSPINSTER, "TONIGHT MY BOY CHAUNCEY, 
SO HELP ME, IS GOING TO BECOME MY FIANCE!" 





fetu/^ 




BUT, SAD TO RELATE, IN SELECTING HER LURE, 

THE LASS'S TECHNIQUE PROVED EXTREMELY UNSURE. 




For Happy Results in Dayton 
Try Smart Young JUDY KING 



With her fabulous 
"World of Fashion" TV 
Show (week-days 1-1:30 
P. M. ) this captivating 
young lady has demon- 
strated a sales technique 
second to none. Ex-Holly- 
wood starlet, housewife 
and doting young 
mother, she combines human warmth, talent and 
glamour in an appeal that women find downright 
irresistible. Let National Representative George P. 
Hollingbery Co. tell you about her sales success 
stories — her personal mailing list built by viewers' 
requests — her availabilities. She can sell for you! 




AND WHAT GOOD'S A LOUSE WHO JUST WANTS TO PLAY HOUSE 
WHEN A GAL'S GOT HER HEART REALLY SET ON A SPOUSE? 






MORAL: Woo your Dayton market 
through Dayton's first and 
favorite station — WHIO-TV. 




if Dayton has been an afternoon TV 
town from the start — and offers 
(last count! ) 162,000 receivers. 



Ifraytime T\ 



Daytime TV: Times of Sign-on and Sign-off for 107 V. S. Stations (continued) 



CITY AND 
STATION 



NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 



HOURS ON THE AIR 



STATION 
REPS 



KNBH 



NBC 



Sun, 5:00 pm-l2:00 midnight NBC Spot 

Mon-Fri, 9:30 am-l2:00 midnight Sales 
Sat, 5:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 



\ KECA-TV 



ABC 



Sun-Sat, 12:30 pm-l:30 am 



ABC Spot 
Sales 



KTSL 



Louisville 



DTN Sun (dark) Blair 

Mon-Thu, 5:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Fri, 5:15 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 5:15 pm-l 1:00 pm 

73,300 sets 



WHAS-TV CBS Sun, 2:00 pm-l2:00 midnight Petry 

Mon, 12:30 pm-IO:30 pm 
Tue, 12:30 pm-IO:55 pm 
Wed, 12:30 pm-IO:l5 pm 
Thu, 1-2:30 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Fri, 12:30 pm-IO:45 pm 
Sat, 1:15 pm- 10:40 pm 

WAVE-TV ABC, NBC Sun, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 

Mon-Fri, 1 :30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 



Free & Peters 



Memphis 



70,100 sets 



WMCT 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 12:00 noon-l2:05 am 
DTN, NBC Mon, 12:00 noon-l2:35 am 

Tue-Thu, 12:00 noon-l2:05 am 
Fri, 12:00 noon-l I :35 pm 
Sat, 12:00 noon-l 1:45 pm 



Branham 



Miami 



50,000 sets 



WTVJ 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 10:30 am- 1 1:45 pm 
DTN, NBC Mon, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 
Tue, 12:00 noon-l2:30 am 
Wed, 12:00 noon-l 1:30 pm 
Thu, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 12:00 noon-l2:30 am 
Eat, 1:30 pm-l2:45 am 



Free & Peters 



j Milwaukee 


202,000 sets 


< WTMJ-TV ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 12:30 pm-l2:00 midnight Harrington, 
Mon-Fri, 12:00 noon-l2:00 midnight Righter & 
Sat, 3:00 pm-l 1:00 pm Parsons 


Minneapolis St. Paul 


217,000 sets 


KSTP-TV NBC 


fun-Sat, 12:00 noon-l2:00 midnight Petry 



WTCN-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 10:15 am-l2:45 am 

DTN Mon, 10:15 am-l2:20 am 

Tue, 10:00 am-l2:20 am 
Wed, 10:15 am-l2:35 am 
Thu, 10:15 am-l2:50 am 
Fri, 10:15 am-l2:35 am 
Sat, 8:30 am- 1:00 am 



Free & Peters 



Nashville 




23,000 sets 




WSM-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun-Fri, 2:00 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Sat, 10:30 atn-l 1:00 pm 


Petry 


Newark 




(Sets included in New York 


market) 


WATV 


- 


Sun, 12:00 noon-l:00 am 
Mon-Fri, 11:15 am-l:00 am 
Sat, 12:30 pm-l:00 am 


Weed 


New Haven 




130,000 sets 





WNHC-TV ABC, CBS, Sun 12:00 noon-l 1:15 pm 

DTN, NBC Mon, 1:30 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Tue, 1:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Wed, 1:30 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Thu, 1:30 pm-l2:45 am 
Fri, 1:30 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Sat, I 1:30 am-l 1:45 pm 



Katz 



New Orleans 



47,200 sets 



WDSU-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, I 1 :00 am- 12:00 midnight 

DTN, NBC Mon-Thu, 10:00 am-l2:05 am 
Fri, 10:00 am-l2:30 am 
Sat. 10:00 am-l2:35 am 



Blair 



CITY AND 
STATION 



NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 



HOURS ON THE AIR 



New York 



2,050,000 sets 



WOR-TV 



Sun, 4:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Mon, 9:30 am-l 1:45 pm 
Tue-Wed, 9:30 am-l2:00 midnight 
Thu, 9:30 am-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 9:30 am-l2:45 am 
Sat, 2:00 pm-l:00 am 



WABD 



DTN 



Eun, 2:30 pm-l 1:05 pm 
Mon, 9:15 am-l 1:05 pm 
Tue, 9:15 am-l 1:35 pm 
Wed, 9:15 am-l2:20 am 
Thu, 9:15 am-l2:35 am 
Fri, 9:15 am-l 1:05 pm 
Sat, 6:00 pm- 12:20 am 



WPIX 



Sun, I fr.00 am-l:00 am 
Mon-Thu, 12:00 noon-l:l5 am 
Fri-Sat, I 1:30 am-l:l5 am 



WJZ-TV 



ABC Sun-Sat, 11:30-12:00 midnight 



Norfolk 



50,500 sets 



WTAR-TV 



ABC, CBS, Sun, 2:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
DTN, NBC Mon-Fri, 10:00 am-l2:05 am 
Sat, 12:15 pm-l2:00 midnight 



KMTV 



ABC, CBS Sun, 12:25 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Mon, 12:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Tue, 12:30 pm-IO:25 pm 
Wed, 12:30 pm-IO:40 pm 
Thu, 12:30 pm-l 1:40 pm 
Fri, 12:30 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Sat, 5:00 pm-IO:00 pm 



WOW-TV DTN, NBC Sun, 1 :45 pm-l 1 :00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 1:00 pm-l2:05 am 
Tat, 3:00 pm-l2:05 am 



Philadelphia 



750,000 sets 



WFIL-TV 



ABC 



Sun I I :45 am-l 1:00 pm 
Mon, 7:15 am-l 1:30 pm 
Tue, 11:00 am-l2:00 midnight 
Wed, 11:00 am-l2:IO am 
Thu, I I :00 am-l 1:45 pm 
Fri, I 1:00 am-l 1:30 pm 
Sat, I 1:30 am-l2:30 am 



I Please turn Id paiie 



station 
reps 



DTN 



WCBS-TV CBS Sun, 9:55 am-l 1:15 pm 

Mon, 11:15 am-l I :30 pm 
Tue-Fri, 10:00 am-l 1:30 pm 
Sat, 10:00 am-l I :00 pm 

WNBT NBC Sun. 9:30 am- 1 1:45 pm 

Mon-Fri, 11:00 am- 12:00 midnight 
Sat, 9:30 am-l 1:45 pm 



Petr 



Oklahoma City 


68,000 sets 




WKY-TV ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Mon-Fri, 1:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 3:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 


Kafa 


Omaha 


55,800 sets 





Katz 



Kah 



WCAU-TV CBS Sun, 10:00 am-l:00 am 

Mon, 10:00 am-l:30 am 
Tue, 8:00 am- 1:50 am 
Wed, 8:00 am- 1:45 am 
Thu, 8:00 am- 1:35 am 
Fri, 8:00 am-l:30 am 
Sat, I 1:00 am-l2:30 am 



WPTZ 


NBC 


Sun, 1 1 :00 am-l2:l5 am 
Mon-Fri, 7:30 am-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 9:00 am-l 1:30 pm 


NBC Spot 
Sales 


Phoenix 




25,100 sets 




KPHO-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 4:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Mon-Sat, 2:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 


Petry 



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TELEVISION 



II 



DIVISION 

it 



9028 SUNSET BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD 46, 

29 JANUARY 1951 



CALIFORNIA • 8822 WEST WASHINGTON BOULEVARD, CULVER CITY, CALIFORNIA 

59 



J 



ifaytime TV 



CITY AND 
STATION 



NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 



HOURS ON THE AIR 



STATION 
REPS 



Pittsburgh 



212,000 sets 



WDTV 



ABC, CBS, Eun, 12:45 pm-l2:30am 
DTN, NBC Mon-Tue, 11:00 am-l2:30 am 
Wed, 11:00 am-l2:05 am 
Thu, I 1:00 am-l2:20 am 
Fri, 11:00 am-l2:05 am 
S*t. 9:30 am-l2:20 am 



DTN 



Providence 




120,000 sets 




WJAR-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 10:25 am-I2:00 midnight 
Mon-Fri, 10:10 am-l2:00 midnight 
Sat, 10:02 am-l2:45 am 


Weed 


Richmond 




57,100 sets 





WTVR 



ABC, CBS, Sun, I 1:30 am-l2:00 midnight 
DTN, NBC Mon, 2:00 pm- 12:00 midnight 
Tue, 1:30 pm-l2:30 am 
Wed, 1:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Thu, 1:30 pm-l I :45 pm 
Fri, 1:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Sat, I 1:00 am-!2:00 midnight 



Blair 



Rochester 



70,100 sets 



WHAM-TV ABC, CBS, 

DTN, NBC 



Sun, 12:25 pm-l2:30 am 
Mon-Thu, 2:30 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Fri-Sat, I 1:00 am- 1:00 am 



Hollingbery 



Rock Island 



(Sets included in Davenport market) 



WHBF-TV ABC, CBS, Sun, 3:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 

DTN Mon, 5:45 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Tue, 5:45 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Wed-Thu, 5:30 pm- 10:45 pm 
Fri, 5:45 pm- 1 I :45 pm 
Cat, 6:25 pm-l 1:00 pm 



Salt Lake City 



36,400 sets 



KSL-TV 



ABC, CBS, 
DTN 



Sun, 4:00 pm-IO:20 pm 
Mon, 2:00 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Tue, 2:00 pm-l 1 :30 pm 
Wed, 2:00 pm-l 1:15 pm 
Thu, 2:00 pm-IO:30 pm 
Fri, 2:00 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Sat, 6:00 pm- 10:45 pm 



Radio Sales 
(CBS) 



KDYL-TV NBC Sun, 2:30 pm-l2:00 midnight Blair 

Mon-Sat, 3:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 



San Antonio 



37,200 sets 



WOAI-TV CBS, NBC 



Sun, 3:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Mon, 5:40 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Tue, 5:25 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Wed-Fri, 5:40 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Sat, 6:00 pm-l2:35 am 



Petry 



KEYL 



ABC, DTN Sun-Mon, 5:10 pm-IO:45 pm 
Tue (dark) 

Wed, 5:10 pm-IO:IO pm 
Thu, 2:10 pm-l 1 :00 pm 
Fri, 5:10 pm-IO:l5 pm 
Sat, 5:00 pm-IO:l5 pm 



Avery-Knodel 



S. Stations 


(continued) 






CITY AND 
STATION 


NETWORK 
AFFILIATION 


HOURS ON THE AIR 




STATION | 
REPS 


K RON -TV 


NBC 


Sun, 1:00 pm-l 1:05 pm 
Mon, 1:00 pm-l2:05 am 
Tue, 1:00 pm-l2:30 am 
Wed-Fri, 1:00 pm-l 2:05 am 
Sat, 2:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 




Free & f> e 


Schenectady 




1 33,000 sets 






WRGB 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 1:00 pm-l 1:30 pm 
Mon-Fri, 1:15 pm-l2:00 midni 
Jat, 1:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 


ght 


NBC Spot! 

Sales 


Seattle 




63,100 sets 






KING-TV 


ABC, CBS, 

DTN, NBC 
Paramount 


Sun, 1 1 :25 am-l 1 :35 pm 
Mon, 4:45 pm-l 1:05 pm 
Tue, 3:15 pm-l2:30 am 
Wed-Fri, 3:00 pm-l2:00 midn' 
Sat, 4:30 pm-l2:20 am 


ght 


Blair 


St. Louis 




239,000 sets 




i 


XSD-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 8:45 am-l2:35 am 
Mon-Tue, 10:45 am-l2:35 am 
Wed, 10:45 am- 12:40 am 
Thu, 10:45 am-l2:35 am 
Fri, 10:45 am-l:05 am 
Sat, 10:15 am-l:05 am 




Free & P e t| 


Syracuse 




95,100 sets 






WHEN 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN 


Sun, 12:00 noon-ll:l5 pm 
Mon, 12:55 pm-l2:30 am 
Tue-Thu, 12:55 pm-l 1:45 pm 
Fri, 12:55 P m-I2:l5 am 
Sat, 11:30 am-l2:00 midnight 




Kah 


WSYR-TV 


NBC 


Sun, 1:35 pm-IO:45 pm 
Mon-Fri, 8:00 am-l2:00 midni 
Sat, 1:00 pm- 12:00 midnight 


ght 


Headley- 
Reed 


Toledo 




75,000 sets 






WSFD-TV 


ABC, CBS, 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 2:45 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 10:00 am-l2:00 midnight 

Sat. 1:00 Dm-I2:00 midniqht 


Kati 


Tulsa 




58,200 sets 






KOTV 


ABC, CBS. 
DTN, NBC 


Sun, 2:00 pm-l 1 :00 pm 
Mon, 2:30 pm-l2:l5 am 
Tue, 2:45 pm-l2:l5 am 
Wed, 3:00 P m-I2:l5 am 
Thu, 2:45 pm-l2:l5 am 
Fri, 3:00 pm-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 5:00 Dm-I2:00 midnight 




Young 


Utica 




33,000 sets 






WKTV 


ABC, CBS, 


Sun-Tue, 1:25 pm-l2:00 midni 


ght 


Cooke 



DTN, NBC 



Wed-Fri, 1:25 pm-l 1:00 pm 
Sat, 1:25 pm-l2:00 midnight 



Washington 



220,000 sets 



San Diego 




76,000 sets 




KFMB-TV 


ABC. CBS. 
NBC, Para- 
mount 


Sun, 12:00 noon-l 1:30 pm 
Mon, 2:00 pm-l 1:40 pm 
Tue, 2:00 pm-l2:00 midnight 
Wed, 2:00 pm-l2:IO am 
Thu, 2:00 pm-l 1:55 pm 
Fri, 2:00 pm-l 1:10 pm 
Sat, 6:00 pm-l 1:45 pm 


Branham 


San Francisco 




143,000 sets 




KPIX 


CBS, DTN 


Sun, 2:00 pm-IO:30 pm 
Mon, 6:30 pm-IO:45 pm 
Tue, 1:30 pm-l 1 :30 pm 
Wed-Fri, 1:30 pm-l 1:00 pm 

Sat, 3:00 pm-IO:45 pm 


Kat7 


KGO-TV 


ABC 


Sun-Sat, 3:00 pm-l 1:20 pm 


ABC Spot 
Sales 



WMAL-TV ABC Sun, I 1 :55 am-l 1 :05 pm 

Mon, 1:55 pm-l 1:05 pm 
Tue, 1 :55 pm-l 1 :20 pm 
Wed, 1:55 pm-l2:05 am 
Thu, 1:55 pm-l 1:20 pm 
Fri, 1 :55 pm-l2:20 am 
SM. 10:55 am-l2:05 am 



Sale 



WTTG 



DTN Sun, 7:25 pm- 10:00 pm 

Mon-Fri, 10:00 am-l 1:15 pm 
Sat, 6:45 pm-8:30 pm 



WTOP-TV CBS Sun, 1:55 P m-I2:l5 am 

Mon, 1:25 pm-l2:30 am 
Tue-Fri, 1:25 pm-l2:l5 am 
Sat, 9:55 am-l2:00 midnight 



WNBW 



NBC Sun, 12:00 noon-l2:l5 am 

Mon-Fri, 12:30 pm-l2:l5 ar 
Sat, 3:30 pm-!2:30 am 



Wilmington 



53,600 sets 



WDEL-TV DTN, NBC Sun, 2:00 pm-l 1:18 pm 

Mon-Fri, 1:45 pm-l2:03 am 
Sat, 5: 15 pm-l 1 :33 pm 



Meeke 



Dttytime TV 






Shortest distance between seller and buyer 

... an oasis of radio-TV data. For complete 
information, write Norm Knight at 510 
Madison Ave., New York 22. 



•• 




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Daytime 3 1 



TV SOAP OPERA 

{Confirmed from page 39 I 
makes for studio monotony. Volatile 
Thespians are hard put to keep their 
minds in a state of passionate atten- 
tion. The cast of one radio serial once 
broke away, while the director's back 
was turned, and did a Conga line into 
and through the neighboring studio 
where another group of actors was re- 
hearsing another serial. Agency and 
network executives looked the other 
way. 

From the studio of the new fide TV 
serial already have come hints of 
strain. A New York Times reporter 
pictures the players "laughing at lines 
intended to draw audience sniffles and 
groaning at sections that are supposed 
to draw laughs." He goes on to de- 
scribe their conduct in the face of 10 
daily hours of rehearsal that results in 
about 10 minutes of story I the rest of 
the period being consumed by com- 
mercials, lead-ins, credits, etc. ) . 
"Wearily they slump into folding 
chairs, shuffle scripts, light cigarettes 
and go to work." To better understand 
the Times report, run down the grim 
time-table. Here is the telltale TV 
work-load I the right word I of The 
First Hundred Years: 
9:30-11 Dry run. in set, without 

cameras 
11-11:30 Luncheon break for actors, 
ivhile announcer rehears- 
es his commercials 
11:30-1 Make-up. costume, light 
checks, brush-up on dia- 
logue 
1-2 Dress rehearsal, with cam- 

era crew 
2-2:30 Last revisions, cuts, cues, 

etc. 
2:30-2:45 On the air, CBS-TV 
2:45-3:00 Breathing spell (sic) 
3:00-5:30 First read-through and re- 
hearsal of next day's 
script 
Note, particularly, that no sooner 
has today's telecast been completed 
than preparations for tomorrow's be- 
gins. Note, too, that there is a full 
factory-like work schedule, five days a 
week. All of the time of all of the six 
contract players is tied up, since thev 
could not accept any other acting en- 
gagements requiring morning or after- 
noon appearances and, for all practi- 
cal purposes, they need at least part of 
their evenings for homework, i.e. mem- 
orizing) . 

The First Hundred Years preempts 
the entire professional energies of Ev- 

29 JANUARY 1951 



erett I Bud I Gammon as studio direc- 
tor. He arrives early, departs late, is 
incessantly preoccupied with the im- 
mediate detail and urgency of getting 
on the air. A full-time producer, Mur- 
ray Bolen. is also required. To him 
falls the responsibilities of over-all su- 
pervision, policy, casting, script clear- 
ance, author conferences, scenerj and 
props procurement, network contact, 
and so on. He is Walter Craig's alter 
ego on the show but because of the 
highly important and experimental na- 
ture of the whole project and because 
at the outset almost every decision was 
a basic policy matter, hundreds of 
hours of Craig's personal attention has 
been focussed upon this serial. 

Craig and his team confront prob- 
lems, plural, of know-how and often 
must proceed by something like dead 
reckoning. Here, of course, Craig's 
years of experience as writer and stag- 
er of theatrical productions is most 
useful. But the risks remain. TV se- 
rials have costs of which radio knows 
naught. More things can go wrong. 
More details must be checked and a 
great many more crewmen must be 
fused with foresighted skill. None of 
this is merely virtuosity off in a cor- 
ner. All of it is directly related to ad- 
vertising ways and means. Out of the 
sponsor's purse, nobody else's, must 
come the coin to pay for the extra 
items, and the extra hands, which 
sight-added-to-sound necessitates. 

Run down the roster of personnel 
that reports five days a week at the 
special TV studio in New York's Lie- 
derkranz Hall from which these daily 
quarter hours originate. The produc- 
er is there, and the director. Each has 
a full-time girl aide, the director's lass 
being called, Hollywood style, script 
girl. Count the others now. Three 
boom men, one audio engineer, three 
cameramen, one floor manager, one as- 
sistant director, two shaders, one turn- 
table operator, two telecine room oper- 
ators (for commercial slides, film, bal- 
lops, etc.). Add the standard back- 
stage theatrical trio of master electri- 
cian, master carpenter, master proper- 
ties custodian. Then two extra grips, 
one electrician, one property man, one 
light supervisor, one make-up man. 
Organist, actors, announcers, product 
demonstrators, figure separately. 

Think back now to the radio serial 
with its quickie one-hour run-through 
before broadcast. Typically almost any 
day there are present no more than five 
actors, an announcer, a sound effects 



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SALES AVQOBILITIES. 
<&# TUESDAY WT, 



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West Virginias 

J0 The KftE AOENCY 



63 



Daytime TV 



YOU MIGHT THROTTLE A 
LEOPARD WITH YOUR 
BARE HANDS'- 








$ «f 111 



but... la 

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TO CAPTURE 

KALAMAZOO -GRAND RAPIDS! 

W hether you use radio or television, there are very few 
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WKZO-WJEF, a sure-fire CBS combination, deliver about 
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In the Grand Rapids area alone, WKZO-WJEF have an un- 
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WJEF's unduplicated BMB Daytime audience has increased 
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fe*A IN GRAND RAPIDS 1** ,N WESTERN MICHIGAN ^ « KALAMAZOO 
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ALL THREE OWNED AND OPERATED BY 



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Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



64 



technician, organist, engineer, director 
and assistant director, 11 people in 
contrast to around 35 required for the 
television equivalent. 

Ponder dress and make-up. In radio 
there are no problems of personal ap- 
pearance for nobody, except her pals, 
sees the leading lady. If the radio 
heroine slouches up to the microphone, 
as she sometimes does, in a rump- 
sprung sloppy skirt with a what-the- 
heck sweater to match, it doesn't mat- 
ter. The illusion of her role is unaf- 
fected. She doesn't have to be fashion- 
ably gowned, only fashionably voiced. 
Entirely different with The First Hun- 
dred Years, which charges up the 
gowns the actresses are required to 
wear according to the story's shifting 
scenes. Male actors must not only be 
suited but kept in press. Hence a ward- 
robe department, and a wardrobe mis- 
tress to run it, comes into being, again 
something unknown to radio. 

Furniture and props are another 
added vexation. These are rented or 
bought, transported or stored. Detail 
and cost, cost and detail. 

In blueprinting the show, Craig and 
his management colleagues agreed with 
author Jean Holloway how to keep the 
action of the story contained within 
the domestic spheres of three couples, 
a boy and girl just married and their 
respective sets of parents. The CBS 
studio was then measured for a tightly- 
morticed set of settings fitted back to 
back for maximum use of floor space. 
Each couple "lives" in its own distinc- 
tive living room but one dining room 
can be "dressed" or shot from different 
angles to serve all. So, also, with a 
serve-all-the-couples dressable kitchen 
set, various staircases, window frames 
and so on. 

It is essential to good television per- 
formance that actors be "up" in their 
lines, but there is barely enough time 
from day to day. Craig experimented 
with the use of a unique mechanical 
teleprompter, invented by Fred Barton, 
a Broadway actor. Here perhaps is as 
good a place as any to alert readers of 
sponsor to the teleprompter which may 
well have an important function in TV. 
Essentially, it's a typewriter with noth- 
ing but giant lithograph-like capital 
letters. On this machine the script of 
each day's episode is typed onto huge 
rolls of paper. The latter is then 
mounted on a moving easel which can 
be speeded up or slowed down as the 
show's pace requires. To date this has 
proved decidedly helpful, not as a sub- 

SPONSOR 



Daytime TV 



stitute for memory, but as an emer- 
gency saviour. On several occasions 
individual players have averted a total 
"blow" or lapse of memory by darting 
a glance at the teleprompter. The ma- 
chine is set up to one side out of cam- 
era angle. 

Here are the typical-of-television 
touches: Royalty on the teleprompter 
is $100 a day for a 15-minute show, 
the owner providing the jumbo script 
on rollers ready to go; immediately 
the contrivance was introduced on the 
floor, the Stagehands Union asserted 
jurisdiction and a union technician is 
now assigned at each session. 

The advertising mentality naturally 
comes back, like a homing pigeon, to 
this one crucial theme of cost. Invidi- 
ous comparison with radio daily chap- 
ter drama is inescapable. So is rela- 
tive quality of the literary and acting 
factors. To nobody's surprise radio- 
trained Miss Holloway is having her 
troubles. She and the set-and-depth 
limited TV cameramen are not yet in 
complete rapport. Scenes come out 
stiff. Actors move slowly, speak self- 
consciously. Subtleties are "written 
in" at the typewriter but don't emerge 
in performance. Characterization "col- 
or" is certainly in the author's mind, 
and the actors' intentions, but often 
eludes capture. There may be as much 
actual story meat in the TV episodes 
as in an average radio episode, but 
sight-and-sound is a tougher ordeal 
than sound-only. The viewer is 
brought back to the essential reality 
of the two media. In radio, the listen- 
er closes his or her eyes, and imagines; 
in television, the viewer opens his or 
her eyes, and sees. The radio listener 
can conjure, the video viewer must ac- 
cept. This is head-on collision with 
realism. 

The scripts for television's first se- 
rial stand the sponsor around $1,000 a 
week of the $11,000 (estimated) week- 
ly production budget. That the Jean 
Holloway scripts have thus far been 
the show's major weakness is a secret 
to nobody. The agency has had a se- 
ries of story conferences and sturdier 
daily episodes should be coming 
through hereafter. 

Granted these are writing and pro- 
duction dilemmas and that it is pre- 
cisely to find out about them, and solve 
them if possible, that Procter & Gam- 
ble is paying the piper. The advertis- 
ing interest remains sufficiently obvi- 
ous because it is all part of the story 
of. cost and what the sponsor gets for 



^fdi/erti 



iSers on 



WX£J!telt 



US 



that theu buu more tit 



tl 



ime on 



u buu more in an 
channel 9 • . . . 



theu tell us about 



our 



Service, our 



friend I u 

efficient personnel, ana 

most important of- course . . . . 

our outstanding sales results. 

rJLihe to find out for uourSelf 

about Cleveland 5 best 

^J V buu . 

K^all the ^J\atz — ^raencu todi 



aencu 



l t 



for the fuit l/i//\(LryL storu . . . . 



29 JANUARY 1951 



65 



atftime TV 



hu 



hi* money. 

Certainly few advertisers will rush 
to the sponsorship of daytime TV se- 
rials at this time, but they would be 
poor sports were they to sneer at the 
flounderings of Miss Holloway and the 
stilted playing. When the history of 
video is set down in time to come, the 
daring of Procter & Gamble and the 
grappling of Benton & Bowles will be 
seen to be in the best tradition of cre- 
ative showmanship - - even though, 
quoting the New York Times again. 
"Perhaps never has so much sweat 
been poured into so little script." * * * 



SPOT PROGRAMING 

( Continued from page 43 I 
Program descriptions by type: 

COOKING 

What's New, WTMJ-TV iVIilwaukee. 
Monda\ through Friday. 2:00-2:45 
p.m. 

This cooking show was mentioned 
by over 77% of women respondents 
in a recent Milwaukee Journal poll. 
Woman's service topics are included 



but the emphasis is on cooking — par- 
ticularly on how to make tasty recipes 
on an economy budget. Show's cook- 
ing expert is Breta Griem. who, like 
many of the personalities on programs 
of this type, has a long background of 
cooking school experience. Show is 
limited to live participations because 
station believes film may hurt mood of 
show; and, moreover, that sponsor gets 
more for his money when commercial 
is done live by the show's own talent. 

Cost: $75 per participation. 

Rep: Harrington. Rigliter \ Parsons 

Josephine McCarthy Cooking Show, 
WNBT. New York.' Monday through 
Friday, 9:45-10:00 a.m. 

Like many another daytime radio 
personality, Josephine McCarthy has 
made a successful transition to televi- 
sion. Show has sold for Arnold Bread. 
Best Foods. Diplomat Soups. Hell- 
man's Mayonnaise. 

Cost: $163 per participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 

KPIX Kitchen. KPIX. San Francisco. 
Tuesday through Friday. 1:30-2:30 
p.m. 



Buffalo Television 
Si oris nl %)<W 



WBEN-TV tignt on at noon lo bring the viewers of 171,211* 
sets in the Western New York area the cream of network daytime 
programs plus topnotch sales-proved Buffaio-built shows. Here 
are three afternoon standouts. 



MEET THE MILLERS 



SHOPPERS GUIDE 



MATINEE PLAYHOUSE 



Get tna WBEN-TV story from 
Harrington, Righter & Parsons, 
Chicago, or write Sales Man- 
ager, WBEN-TV, Buffalo 7, NY. 



Bill and Mildred Miller, successful business people with 
two decades of show business background, demonstrate 
food-preparation twice weekly and interview interesting 
personalities three times each week. 

Mary Jane and Seymour Abeles, with network and 
theatrical experience, chat entertainingly about products 
and services four afternoon half-hours weekly. They 
have one of the nation's top daytime ratings. 

Full-length films, divided into two daily installments, pro- 
vide a magnet for WBEN-TV's afternoon listeners. A 
45-minute show with sales messages. 



WBEN-TV 

NBC BASIC BUFFALO 2, N. Y. 



* Power Company iratiitia from loading di'ifrioufors, excfuirv* of fdousondi in nearby Canaaa. 



Faye Stewart stresses the budgetary 
aspects of homemaking and shows her 
audience how to dress up and serve 
interesting meals. Guest experts appear 
on the program to discuss fashion and 
beauty notes with Faye. 

Cost: $35 per participation. 

Rep: Katz 

Come Into the Kitchen, KTTV, Los 
Angeles, Monday through Friday. 
3:00-3:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Fred Nelson, folksy housewife, 
cook extraordinaire, and mother of 
three children, makes a point of dem- 
onstrating products of participating 
sponsors, which have included Kros-0 
i copper cleaner). Wilbur-Suchard 
Chocolate Company, and Kermin Food 
Products Company. 

Cost: $80 per participation. 

Rep: Radio Sales (CBS) 

Musical Kitchen, KLAC-TV, Los An- 
geles. Monday-Saturday, 12:00 noon- 
1 p.m. 

Genial Mike Roy has two house- 
wives as his guest each day, one pre- 
paring a main course while the other 
demonstrates the art of dessert mak- 
ing. On Saturdays, a famous chef is 
brought in as a special guest. Mike 
Roy does the selling. 

Cost: $90 per participation. 

Rep: Katz 



SHOPPING 

World of Fashion. WHIO-TV. Dayton, 
Monda\ through Friday. 1:00-1:30 
p.m. 

Show features fashion news about 
clothing, jewelry, coiffures, skin care, 
and other feminine topics. Guests visit 
with Jud\ King, star of the program. 

Cost: $25 per participation or $10 
per program plus time. 

Rep: Hollingbery 

Nancy Osgood Show, WNBW, Wash- 
ington. D. C. Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, 12:30-1:00 p.m. 

The show takes place in an informal 
apartment, with stress on entertaining 
the housewife. Nancy Osgood, well 
known woman commentator in Wash- 
ington, is assisted in product demon- 
strations by her 22-year-old daughter, 
Mary Jane Hays. 

Cost: $50. for one-time participa- 
tion. Subject to 10' r frequency dis- 
count. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 



66 



SPONSOR 



Daytime T 



Morning • . . afternoon . . . evening * 
WSB-TV dominates the Atlanta television market, 
idvertisers more viewers per dollar 
more pull per dollar. Of interest 
to time buyers — 99% of the 
Atlanta market's TV sets 
are home sets! 




•)(• WSB-TV share of audience (October- 
November Hooper Television Audi- 
ence Index); Monday thru Friday, 
8:00 A. M. to 12:00 noon -92.2%. 
Monday thru Friday, 12:00 noon to 
6:00 P. M.-75%. Sunday, 12:00 noon 
thru 6:00 P. M.— 62.5%. Sunday thru 
Saturday evening, 6:00 P M. to 
10:30 P. M.-55.4%. For further de- 
tails, see your Petry man. 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution 



29 JANUARY 1951 



67 



, Da y time TV 



■H 




Helpful techniques 
^ and ideas for 
TV programs 



This new book 
shows you how to 
use movies most 



effectively 



MOVIES FOR TV 



by /. H. Battison is a complete, how-to,-do- 
it guide to the production and transmission 
of movies on television. It gives practical 
information on all cameras, projectors, re- 
cording equipment, etc., showing how each 
piece operates and how to use it most effi- 
ciently. It tells how to produce titles and 
special effects, newsreels, all types of com- 
mercials; how to edit and splice film; how 
to light scenes for best results on TV; how 
to combine movies with live scenes. Here is 
a wealth of useful information together 
with much experienced advice on what is 
good and what bad in movies for televi- 
sion, and why. 



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Please send me a copy of Movies for TV 1 will 
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Address- 



BMI 



SERVICE 

Service is one of the basic 
theme songs of BMI. Broad- 
casters in AM, FM and TV 
are using all of the BMI aids 
to programming . . . saleable 
and useful program continui- 
ties, research facilities, expert 
guidance, in music library 
operations, and all the other 
essential elements of music in 
broadcasting. 

Along with service to the 
broadcaster, BMI makes avail- 
able to its 2,808= licensees a 
vast and varied repertoire 
ranging from be-bop to the 
classics. BMI is constantly 
gaining new outlets, building 
new sources of music and con- 
stantly expanding its activities. 
The BMI broadcast licensee 
can be depended upon to meet 
every music requirement. 

*2 80S as of Jan. 2i, 1951 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



Idea Shop, WNBK, Cleveland, Monday 
through Friday, 2:30-3:00 p.m. 

Each afternoon Mildred Funnel and 
Gloria Brown have a bevy of wares to 
sell in their Idea Shop. Program cov- 
ers household hints, good shopping 
buys, and fashion tips. 

Cost: .$70 gross per participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 

Buying with Betty, KNBH, Hollywood, 
Monday through Friday, 9:45-10:15 
a.m. 

This is primarily a half-hour shop- 
ping show directed at the women in the 
home. Betty Hoyt assisted by Arch 
Presby draws top audience mail week 
after week. Guests appear from time 
to time to add variety. 

Cost: $85 per participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 



SERVICE-INTERVIEW 

Television Charm School, KDYL-TV, 
Salt Lake City, Wednesday. Friday at 
4:00 p.m. 

Charm tips, advice on posture, 
graceful stance are given by Salt Lake 
City model instructor Ruth Tolman. 
Says Darrell Sisemore. local beauty 
salon operator: "My advertising of 
permanent waves on KDYL-TV has 
doubled my business. Two things im- 
press me about the results Fve had 
from afternoon TV. One is that it gets 
results quick — much faster than any 
other form of advertising I have per- 
sonally used. The other factor is the 
hold-over impact. It's not unusual for 
a woman to come in a month after a 
particular item has been mentioned 
and ask for it — mentioning that she 
saw me on KDYL-TV." (The beau- 
tician appears in his own five-minute 
participating period.) 

Rep: Blair 

Kathi Norris Show, WNBT, New York, 
Monday through Friday, 12:00 noon- 
1:00 p.m. 

Program is an informal get-together 
with housewife-viewers. Kathi gives 
household suggestions, tells about the 
newest time savers. A regular feature, 
'"Good Buys," constitutes the main por- 
tion of the program. Here, Kathi dis- 
cusses shops where outstanding mer- 
chandise may be bought in New York. 
with exact prices. Guest interviews with 
celebrities, hobbyists, and women who 
own small businesses are a regular fea- 
ture. Occasionally. Kathi also inter- 



views her husband and \ oung daugh- 
ter. 

Saks 34th Street found that one 
Kathi Norris commercial sold 74% as 
many nylon shirts at $5.96 each as did 
their standard newspaper ad, with TV 
83% cheaper. The ad outsold Kathi 
three to two. but at a cost of six to one. 

Cost: $150 per participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 

Margaret A Hen Show, WCBS-TV, New 
York, Monday through Friday, 11:15 
a.m.-12:00 noon. 

In an attractive living room-kitchen 
set, Margaret Arlen and assistant 
Woody Klose offer the latest hints for 
the modern homemaker. Margaret Ar- 
len is a woman's program veteran on 
radio. Klose presents the male point 
of view. The show also includes inter- 
views with celebrities, interior decora- 
tors, and home economists. Margaret 
Arlen sets a relaxed, informal pace. 

Cost: $200, per one-time participa- 
tion. 

Rep: Radio Sales (CBS) 

Exclusively Yours, KRON-TV, San 
Francisco, Monday through Fridav. 
4:00-5:00 p.m. 

Veteran radio and newspaper wom- 
an Marjorie Trumbull is often first to 
bring visiting celebrities before the San 
Francisco public. Those appearing for 
interviews have included: Norman 
Thomas. Leonard Bernstein. Rockwell 
Kent. Kathleen Norris. Eight different 
sponsors participate. 

Rep: Free & Peters 



VARIETY 

The Del Courtney Show, KP1X, San 
Francisco, Tuesday through Sunday; 
2:30-4:45 p.m. on weekdays; 2:00 to 
5:00 Sundays. 

Former nationally known bandsman 
Del Courtney is m.c. of this variety 
show which includes interviews, rec- 
ords, and serious aspects such as a 
weekly salute to various North Cali- 
fornia cities. The Sunday show in- 
cludes a local amateur contest. 

Sponsorship is participating. 

Cost: $50 weekdays; $75 Sundays. 

Rep: Katz 

The Real McKay. WCBS. New York. 
Monday through Fridav. 12:00 noon- 
1:30 p.m. 

Jim McKa) conducts a variety pro- 
gram with the air of a man entertain- 



68 



SPONSOR 



Daytime T\ 



CHANNEL 
5 




HOOPER TELFV/S/ON AU 

NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 1950 SHARE OF TELEVISlOh 


DIENC 

r AUDIE 


EINDE 

NCE 


IX 






TIME 


TV 
SETS- 
IN-USE 


TV 

Station 
"A" 


TV 

Station 

"B" 


TV 

Station 

U C" 


TV 
Station 

"D" 


KTLA 


TV 
Station 

up/; 


TV 
Station 

wri i 


OTMEB 
TV 


SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


27.0 


6.7 


9.6 


14.9 


30.0 


32.0 


- 


6.7 


0.1 


SATURDAY DAYTIME 
8:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M. 


16.6 


3.5 


6.2 


6.7 


1.5 


41.6 


- 


39.0 


1.5 




EVENING 

SUN. THRU SAT. 

6:00 P.M.- 10:00 P.M. 


49.6 


16.6 


5.7 


9.1 


15.5 


33.1 


7.9 


12.0 


0.3 







29 JANUARY 1951 



8S0.000 TV Receivers in Los Angeles area, December 1)1950 



KTLA Studios • 5451 Marathon St., Los Angeles 38 • HOIIywood 9-6363 
Eastern Sales Office • 1501 Broadway, New York 18 • BRyant 9-8700 



KEY STATION OF THE PARAMOUNT TELEVISION NETWORK 



Paul H. Raymer Company, Inc., National Representatives 



69 



^Daytime TV 



ing in his own home. There are songs 
h\ vocalist Ellen Parker, piano play- 
ing, interviews with unusual guests. 
Show precedes CBS network lineup. 
Rep: Radio Sales I CBS I 

Earlyworm Party. WBNS-TV. Colum- 
bus, Monda) through Friday. 10:00- 
11:00 a.m. 

Irwin Johnson has converted his top- 
rated radio show into an informal va- 
riety hour, which originates from the 
Town and Country room of the Neil 
House. From 80 to 100 women guests 
pay $1 for breakfast at every broad- 
cast, then participate in games and 
high jinks. Sponsors include Easy 
Washers. Raytheon, Cory Products, 
and \^ estinghouse sweepers. 

Cost: participations are sold at pub- 
lished time rates, subject to frequency 
discounts. 

Rep: Blair 

Date in Manhattan, WNBT. New York. 
Monday through Friday. 11 a.m. -12:00 
noon. 

Full-hour audience participation 
show. Ed Herlih\ interviews guests 
ranging from Hollywood stars to local 
personages. Music is by Lee Sullivan 
and Cy Coleman Trio. 

Cost: .$180 per one-time participa- 
tion. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 

Herson-in-Person, WNBW. Washing- 
ton. D. C, Monday through Friday. 
2:00-3:00 p.m. 

Besides the talent and chatter of m.c. 
Bill Herson. the show uses film clips 
of singers, dancers, and bands, inter- 
views, girl singers. Herson. himself, 
does songs and solos on the piano and 
organ. 

Cost: $50 per one-time participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 



AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION 

Mary Hartline Show, WENR-TV. Chi- 
cago. Monday through Friday. 5:00- 
5:15 p.m.. CST. 

The show is a studio and viewer par- 
ticipation program. Mary Hartline. 
seated in her living room with four 
children, begins with a musical ques- 
tion game. The contestants are select- 
ed from cards mailed to the program. 
The winner selects a gift from the "gift 
window" and, as an added award, is 
given a chance to make a phone call 
to anyone she chooses. Person called 



also gets a gift. 

Mary Hartline also appears weekly 
on ABC-TVs Super Circus. 

Cost: $750 for network program: 
$200 per program for two or three tele- 
casts weekly; $250 per single program. 

Rep: ABC Spot Sales 

hits Have Fun, WCAU-TV. Philadel- 
phia. Tuesday. Thursday. 10:00-10:30 
a.m. 

Show takes its name from sponsor, 
Lit Brothers department store. It's an 
audience participation show staged 
right in the store. Show 7 cost is $270 
and here are some of the results: three 
one-time announcements for three dif- 
ferent articles scored 11.586 sales of 
hosiery, lamps, and frozen food. 

Rep': Radio Sales (CBS) 

Your Morning Matinee, WLW-T-D-C, 
Cincinnati. Dayton, Columbus. Mon- 
day through Friday. 

Ruth Lyons has been a favorite in 
WLW country for many years. Now 
she's on television and radio simulta- 
neously, with a simulcast of her morn- 
ing show. Entertainment is lively, of- 
ten audience participation type. Fre- 
quently, audience participants are 
drafted to do commercials. Sponsor- 
ship is participating. 

Rep: Crosley 

Jack Gregson Show. K.ECA-TV, Los 
Angeles. Monday through Friday. 
1:30-3:00 p.m. 

The show is two programs in one. 
combining audience participation and 
a variety-type format. Commercials 
are presented personally by Jack Greg- 
son and integrated with the particular 
show segment. If client prefers, filmed 
commercials may be used. 

Cost: one to 12 time rate for a par- 
ticipation is $60. One-minute partici- 
pations may be combined with other 
announcements on KECA-TV to earn 
a discount, with 260 or more partici- 
pations bringing the cost to $48 per 
announcement. 

Rep: ABC Spot Sales 

Ladies' Day. WJBK-TV. Detroit. Mon- 
day through Friday. 12:30-1:30 p.m. 

Ladies'' Day is a combination of sev- 
eral program types. Regular features 
include: 

Footlight Parade — Two acts of ama- 
teur talent with prizes; Hobby Hunt — 
the guest in the audience with the most 
unusual hobbv is interviewed and wins 



a prize; Notable Neighbor — the out- 
standing member of each women's club 
invited to the show is saluted and re- 
ceives a corsage. 

Cost: $95 for one-time participation. 

Rep: Katz 



MOVIES 

Hollywood Playhouse. WPTZ, Phila- 
delphia, Monday through Friday, 2:00- 
3:00 p.m. 

Feature films of every description — 
except Westerns as a rule — have hit 
ratings as high as 27.1 (American Re- 
search Bureau I . Sponsors get products 
featured in six places for the price of 
a single participation. 

Cost: $100 per participation. 

Rep: NBC Spot Sales 

Movie Gems, KTTV, Los Angeles, 
Monday through Friday. 3:30-4:30 
p.m. 

Feature-length movies selected with 
an eye to the housewife audience are 
drawing cards on this participation 
program. Movies preferred are those 
with general comedy, light drama, and 
adventure qualities. Typical choices 
from KTTV's substantial film library: 
Luffing at Luck with Grant Withers; 
Badge of Honor with Buster Crabbe; 
Malay Nights with Johnny Mack 
Brown ; Federal Agent with Bill ( Hop- 
along Cassidy ) Boyd ; Girl Reporter 
with Helen Chandler: Savage Girl with 
Rochelle Hudson. 

Cost: $80 per participation. 

Rep: Radio Sales ( CBS I 



DISK JOCKEY 

3 to Get Ready, WPTZ, Philadelphia. 
Monday through Friday. 7:30-9:00 
a.m. 

Early-morning disk jockey session, 
with genial Ernie Kovacs playing the 
records, announcing the time, report- 
ing the news every 30 minutes. The 
December American Research Bureau 
rating was 5.8 for the entire 90 min- 
utes on Thursday. 7 December. Sur- 
vey was conducted during 1 to 7 De- 
cember, when show had been on air 
less than five days. 

Sponsorship is on participating ba- 
sis, and present sponsors include RCA- 
Victor, Jersey Maid products. Cornet- 
Royal vacuum cleaners. Five sponsors 
are accepted for each half-hour seg- 
ment of show. As an extra, each spon- 
sor gets a time signal audio tie-in plus 



70 



SPONSOR 



If ' 



a mention in the recap at end of pe- 
riod. 

Cost: $45 per participation (intro- 
ductory price ) . 

Rep': NBC Spot Sales 



• • • 



FACTS AND FIGURES 

[Continued from page 36) 

Q. In what percentage of homes 
are people present during the af- 
ternoon and available to look at 
daytime television? 

A. A good indication of how man) 
homes have people present in them 
during the afternoon is provided by 
figures Hooper compiled in January- 
February, 1950 I the last report before 
Hooper stopped issuing national rat- 
ing). Hooper found that between 1:00 
and 5:00 p.m.. during the average 
hour, there was someone present and 
awake in 69.7'r of all homes. There 
was very little difference in the figures 
from hour to hour. Low-point was 
67.2 r /< at 3:00 p.m.: high was 73.4% 
at 4:45 p.m. 



Q How long do viewers look each 
day? 

A. Advertest Research devoted one of 
its monthly reports I called The Tele- 
vision Audience of Today) to daytime 
television in June 1950. Some 846 TV 
homes in the New York viewing area 
were contacted, and respondents, main- 
ly housewives, were asked to give de- 
tailed information on viewing habits. 
One-third of those questioned at that 
time said they viewed television regu- 
larly before 5:00 p.m. (10.7% said 
they viewed occasionally). Among the 
regularly-viewing respondents, the av- 
erage time spent watching on weekdays 
before 5:00 p.m. was two hours and 11 
minutes. 



Q. What time is it most conveni- 
ent for housewives to watch day- 
time television? 

A. Advertest asked all of those who 
said they watched daytime TV regu- 
larly to select "the periods during 
which they felt it was most convenient 
to watch." In general, the figures rose 
with the hour. None of the respondents 
selected 9:30 a.m.; 8.5% selected 
10:45 a.m.; 12.1% selected 11:45 
a.m.; there was a drop at noon, with 



For Vital News • 



as well as for 
entertainment 



Central New Yorkers 

Have Learned 

to Listen 

to 




. . . Public service f hat assures an 
Interested Audience for Your Show 




ACUSE 

AM • FM • TV 



The Only Complete Broadcast Institution in Central New York 
NBC Affiliate — Headley-Reed, National Representatives 



when you're comparing 
radio stations 

. . . make sure to check their Service-Ads 
as well as their listings in SRDS. 

"When I'm using Standard Rale." reports a Time 
Buyer, "I'm looking for certain things. I'm not reading. 
But, if I see an ad which gives station coverage or other 
useful facts not in the listing, I make a point to 
check it." 

Have you noticed, too, how Service-Ads in the Radio 
Section of SRDS, and in Consumer Markets, help— 
especially when you're working fast? Service-Ads like 
WIBW's shown here? 

Such Service-Ads supplement and expand media listings 
in SRDS Radio Section and market listings in Con- 
sumer Markets with information that helps you decide 
which stations and which markets you want. 

Service-Ads. like the one illustrated, in the monthly 
Kadio Section of SRDS and in Consumer Markets 
help inn. buyers huy. 



■ I 

|P wraw-A 9mm **—*- 9 m*t m m §mtmim *•*•• y0 




">e unbeotoble 




Published by Standard Rate t, Data Service, Inc. Walter F Sotthor. Publisher 
333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois • New York ■ los Angeles 



29 JANUARY 1951 



71 



|f>q?;*iint» TV 



the figure declining to 10.6% ; 18.4% 
selected 1:00 p.m.; 30.8% selected 
2:00 p.m.; 44.07 o selected 3:00 p.m.; 
52.5% selected 4:00 p.m.; 55.3% se- 
lected 4:45 p.m. 

Q. What do viewers think of day- 
time television quality? 

A. The regular viewers in Advertest's 
survey were asked to evaluate daytime 
television. This is the box score on 
their opinions: 3.2% thought it was 
Excellent; 62.1% said it was Good; 



28.0% voted Fair; 3.9% said Poor; 
2.8% were Don't Knows. 



Q. Advertest figures (above) on 
times housewives consider most 
convenient to watch indicate a 
steady upward progression as the 
day wears on, but how do these 
figures on "convenience" compare 
with what actually happens? 

A. Figures Hooper compiled for spon- 
sor on TV sets-in-use during Decem- 
ber 1950 show that there is an upward 




MONDAY through FRIDAY 

Starting Daily at 12:30 p. in. 

AN ALL* ARRAY oi the FINEST 

NETWORK and STUDIO PRODUCTIONS 



Afternoon Prorram 
Features: 
News 

Stamps Quartet 
Steve Allen Show 
Variety Fair . . . with 

Gerry Johnson 
Man About Town 

with Jack Gwyn 
Martha McDonald's 
Kitchen - Fun With 
Food, Frances Mus- 
tard 
Garry Moore Show 
"Adventures in 
Learning" 
Mrs. Herbert Emery's 

Book Review. 

"What Do You Read" 

with the Rev. Jimmie 

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"World Today 

Illustrated News 

"Mr. Bear" Puppet 

Show 

OWNERS and OPERATORS 

KRLD 

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KRLD-TV, Channel 4, serves the Souths 
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progression in set usage during the 
day. But there are sharp fluctuations; 
apparently programs on the air at a 
given time as well as convenience are a 
factor in drawing viewers to their sets. 
Here are the Hooper figures for 12:00 
noon to 6:00 p.m. in New York, Mon- 
day through Friday, during the month 
of Decemher 1950. 





TV Sets- 




TV Sets 


Time 


in-Use 


Time 


in-Vse 


12:00 p.m. 


6.0 


3:00 


4.1 


12:15 


3.6 


3:15 


9.1 


12:30 


8.5 


3:30 


7.7 


12:45 


4.6 


3:45 


10.0 


1:00 


4.9 


4:00 


19.4 


1:15 


4.8 


4:15 


14.6 


1:30 


9.5 


4:30 


19.2 


1 :45 


8.0 


4:45 


18.6 


2:00 


9.6 


5:00 


24.2 


2:15 


6.4 


5:15 


23.5 


2:30 


10.0 


5:30 


40.2 


2:45 


9.7 


5:45 


32.9 



NETWORK PROGRAMING 

[Continued from page 45) 

ABC has focussed all of its atten- 
tion thus far on nighttime programing 
and does nothing daytimewise during 
the week, with the exception of several 
kid shows. But from 11:00 a.m. to 
1 :00 p.m. on Saturdays, ABC has four 
half-hour shows sold. These include 
the new Faith Baldwin Show for Maid- 
en Form (11:00 to 11:30 a.m.), Acro- 
bat Ranch (pictured on page 45), for 
General Shoes. Two Girls Named 
Smith for B. T. Babbitt, and / Cover 
Times Square for Air- Wick. The en- 
tire block was bought by the William 
Weintraub Company in an effort to get 
on the ground floor in the time period. 

In general, weekend programing dif- 
fers completely from weekday pattern. 
The weekends are for the whole family 
group and programs scheduled bear no 
resemblance to the feminine-slanted 
weekday formats. Sunday on CBS-TV, 
for example, the afternoon's program- 
ing includes Capitol Cloakroom and 
People's Platform. 

The children's block, starting at five, 
while it is officially part of daytime 
TV, of course bears no resemblance to 
the rest of afternoon programing. 

Summing up, the importance of net- 
work programing lies in its ability to 
pull in increasing numbers of viewers 
who are not yet in the habit of tuning 
in during the afternoon. Since the 
audience in daytime has reached only 
sets-in-use averages ranging around 
15%, there are still plenty of available 
homes yet to be lured in. While net- 
work shows provide the lure, pushing 
up the sets-in-use totals, local pro- 
grams will profit in terms of carryover 
audiences and increased awareness of 
daytime TV. * * * 



12 



SPONSOR 



Daytime TV 




Basic research at RCA Laboratories has led to most of tc 



electronic television advances. 



/Ififie fieGrfo fei/ety -fekm/on set-/ 



Why show RCA Laboratories inside 
your television receiver? Because almost 
every advance leading to all-electronic 
TV was pioneered by the scientists and 
research men of this institution. 

The supersensitive image orthicon tele- 
vision camera was brought to its present 
perfection at RCA Laboratories. The kine- 
scope, in these laboratories, became the 
mass-produced electron tube on the face of 
which you see television pictures. New 
sound systems, better microphones — even 



the phosphors which light your TV screen 
— first reached practical perfection here. 

Most important of all, the great bulk of 
these advances have been made available to 
the television industry. If you've ever seen a 
television picture, you've seen RCA Labora- 
tories at work. 

* * * 

See the latest wonders of radio, television, and 
electronics at RCA Exhibition Hall, 36 West 
49th St., N. Y. Admission is free. Radio Corpo- 
ration of America, RCA Building, Radio City, 
New York 20, New York. 




Through research from RCA Lab- 
oratories, today's RCA Victor tele- 
vision receivers are the finest 
example of electronic engineering. 




Wbr/c/ Leader /n 7^<7<^/o — fcrsf- /n ~7e/ew's/'on 



29 JANUARY 1951 



73 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



With the BAB soon to he revamped and expanded, what 
ideas can you pass along to broadcasters to help them 
provide national advertisers with the facts they want 
about radio? 



Patrick H. Gorman 



Advertising manager 
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. 
New York 




Mr. Seth 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Gorman 

During the past 
16 months I have 
learned more 
ahout the adver- 
tiser's view of ra- 
dio than at any 
time in my expe- 
rience. This is 
the period dur- 
ing which I have 
had to use a gar- 
den spade on 
some 17 different hard-baked indus- 
tries such as jewelry, hardware, furni- 
ture, banking, automotive, home ap- 
pliances, women's apparel and furs, 
men's apparel, shoes, carbonated bev- 
erages and others. These are the fields 
in which extensive research was done 
for the Broadcast Advertising Bureau 
and an effort made to grasp their way 
of doing business, their production and 
sales problems, consumers' reactions to 
their products or services, how they ap- 
proached advertising and how they 
classified various advertising media. 
The next task was to assimilate all this 
information and compile the reports 
which are being issued monthly under 
the title of "BAB Retail Service Stud- 
ies." 

The industries surveyed were almost 
universally better informed about news- 
papers and had more confidence in 
them as a retail medium than in radio. 
In this publication, a statement like 
this borders on heresy but it points 
to one very obvious fact: that newspa- 
pers are a better sold medium than ra- 
dio. Ask any media director what he 
considers the basic medium for market 



development. Nine chances out of ten 
he'll say newspapers. Why? Because 
throughout his career he has probably 
been exposed to convincing promotion, 
result stories and readership studies 
and has been persuaded by his supe- 
riors I who also were kept informed 
over the years ) that newspapers are the 
basic medium. 

It is dangerous for an agencyman to 
pit one medium against another. As a 
matter of fact, in the agency business 
you suddenly arrive at the astounding 
conclusion that all media are good and 
have their place. In my opinion, the 
only time radio has suffered at the 
hands of another medium is when it 
has tried to exaggerate its importance 
or engage in such ridiculous promo- 
tion as "'We're first among all stations 
in our market." 

Broadcasters, above all else, need a 
consistency in their promotion efforts. 
They need to standardize, to present 
the facts (and only the facts) on cov- 
erage, ratings and markets in* an or- 
ganized form. Result stories are al- 
ways valuable in convincing advertis- 
ers of the strength of radio. Individual 
stations as well as networks would do 
well to dig out the important success 
stories in their files and present them 
in some orderly fashion. 

BAB seems best equipped to keep 
agencies and advertisers informed 
about radio, particularly in view of its 
recent reorganization and expanded re- 
sources. But even this competently 
staffed, alert organization will fail in 
its objective if it does not have the co- 
operation and support of broadcasters 
themselves. 

William R. Seth 

Vice President 

Needham & Grohmann Inc. 

New York- 




Mr. Minehan 



As we understand 
it the primary 
function of BAB 
is to promote the 
purchase of radio 
time as the most 
attractive media 
buy for advertis- 
ers and to coop- 
erate with indi- 
vidual stations in 
a way which will 
enable them to make their stations the 
most attractive medium for advertisers 
in their respective markets. 

The agency and the advertiser are 
interested primarily in radio's sales ef- 
fectiveness as compared with other me- 
dia, its cost and its coverage. BAB, 
therefore, should accumulate and make 
available to agencies and advertisers 
as many conclusive, competitive adver- 
tising success stories for each station 
as it is possible for them to get to- 
gether. 

There is a real need for uniform cov- 
erage information for all stations that 
are not members of BMB. The BAB 
can promote the advantages of supply- 
ing uniform coverage information as 
well as market information for such 
station areas. The usual data supplied 
by non-BMB stations consists of half 
millivolt line maps, mail pull maps etc., 
many of which can only be considered 
superficial promotion pieces. There- 
fore, each agene\ must spend consid- 
erable time and money to determine 
the coverage of these stations. There 
is also definite need for market infor- 
mation for station areas showing the 
percent of rural and urban homes in 
the station's coverage area as well as 
a breakdown of working and transpor- 
tation habits. 

In the current media 



situation 



74 



SPONSOR 



wherein television is making heavy in- 
roads into all types of media, BAB, 
through research can provide agencies 
and advertisers with local information 
about coverage, listening and reading 
habits and set ownership. They can 
also develop studies on out-of-homc lis- 
tening on a more extensive basis than 
is currently available. 

While the question of costs may not 
be the primary objective of BAB, they 
can make studies and promote better 
understanding between agencies and 
station owners as regards the mainte- 
nance of costs against a possible de- 
creasing audience in television markets. 
We feel that the time has arrived 
when radio should give serious con- 
sideration to such things as additional 
volume discounts, and 2% cash dis- 
counts for prompt payment. While 
these additional discounts will not in- 
volve large sums of money, we think 
that it will indicate to the advertiser 
and the agency that radio is equipped 
and willing to meet them at least part 
of the way in the face of the constant- 
ly increasing advertising costs. 

Frank Minehan 

Vice President 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Col well 
& Bayles Inc. 

New York 

First, the story of 
radio as the mass 
medium with the 
lowest cost per 
thousand, is the 
most important 
factor and should 
definitely be em- 
phasized to the 
utmost with com- 
parisons to other 
media. Second, 
studies have been done on a limited 
scale as to the effectiveness of the 
spoken word versus the written word. 
This field ®f study should be vastly ex- 
panded and I believe with very inter- 
esting results, (which would be most 
beneficial to the story of radio). 

Another factor would be an extend- 
ed study of the listening habits of peo- 
ple in different income groups. This 
information should cover the types of 
program with the greatest appeal to 
each group as well as the number of 
hours spent listening. This informa- 
tion would aid in the selling of radio 
to clients with products of specific ap- 
peal. 

{Please turn to page 103) 

29 JANUARY 1951 




Mr. Gaynor 




ȣ? 




SPONSORS GET 

"PROMOTION P6US" 

ON 

WDSU 



OVER 1,800 PIECES 
OF DIRECT MAIL 
HIT TOP RETAILERS IN 
THE NEW ORLEANS 
MARKET EVERY MONTH! 



NOW! . . Ywr FALSTAFF Dealer _« 
mm MATCHES 




WDSU 

TV-MI 

NEWS LETTER L 



8553§3t *-s?5*v^-i*^ * j* * 






Dash Dog Food 

DfiAR Iffl DEA1EA 



WDSU U helping Yon SELL 



WDSU 



Tlf IN • CA! 



WDSU 




ALL-PURPOSE BIT 



Radio SUtton WDSU 



• Mailing cards, newsletters, 
and folders . . . sent out every 
week, every month . . . give 
"plus" sales assistance to your 
product and program! 




NO OTHER NEW ORLEANS STATION 
OFFERS THIS PLUS TO SPONSORS! 



• Write, wire 
or phone your 
JOHN BLAIR Man! 



75 




COMPLETE LOCAL NETWORK 
COVERAGE IS THE BIG THING 
ON THE PACIFIC COAST, TOO 



T„ 



lhe don lee network is the BIG network on 
the Pacific Coast— BIG in size (45 stations) and BIG in local prestige in each of 45 important marketing 
areas. In fact, Don Lee is the biggest, most economical advertising medium of any kind you can buy for 
complete Pacific Coast coverage. 

Don Lee gets consistently good reception by Pacific Coast listeners because Don Lee — and only 
Don Lee— was built to meet the special Pacific Coast reception problems. Great distances between mar- 
kets, mountain ranges (5000 to 14,495 feet high) and low ground conductivity made it adviseable to lo- 
cate network stations within each of these many vital markets. That's why the best, most economical 
coverage for the Pacific Coast is obtained with the BIG Network, Don Lee, in 45 strategic markets. 

Only Don Lee offers advertisers, in addition to the biggest, most economical advertising medium 
on the Pacific Coast, all the advantages of hard-hitting local selling, local influence and local prestige. 

willet H. brown, President ■ ward d. ingrim, Vice-President in Charge of Sale* 

I 313 NORTH VINE STREET, HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 










Of 45 Major Pacific Coast Cities 







ONLY 10 

have stations 
of all 4 
networks 




3 

have Don Lee 

and 2 other 

network stations 




8 

have Don Lee 

and 1 other 

network station 




24 

have Don Lee 

and NO other 

network station 




j 



iat's important in selling and it's an exclusive Don Lee selling advantage. 

With Don Lee, you shoot your message exactly where you want it— to meet your specialized mar- 
ling problems. No waste. You buy only what you need. You get coverage to fit your distribution. 

Only Don Lee can release your sales message to all Pacific Coast radio families from a local net- 
jprk station located where they live, where they spend their money. It's the most logical, the most ef- 

Btive, the most economical advertising you can buy for the Pacific Coast. That's why Don Lee con- 
:ently broadcasts more regionally sponsored programs than any other Pacific Coast Network. 

Don Lee Stations on Parade: KOOS-COOS BAY, OREGON 

ou're interested in selling the wealthy "lumber shipping capital of the world," first look at competitive network maps, 
te that the nearest competing network station is located in Eugene, about 65 miles away with mountains in between! 
ere are 23 other Coast markets in which Don Lee has the only network station. If you ivant to cover the whole Pacific 
t, you need the 45 stations of the Don Lee Network. 

%e Nation's Greatest Regional Network 




Represented N.itinihilh by john bi.air & company 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports of 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



Huron on the air whets listeners" appetites 



^ b 
*> o 



z e 



Flowery adjectives and silken-voiced 
announcers help sell many a product. 
The Cleveland Provision Company 
(Wiltshire Meat Products) helieves in 




Sponsor and m.c. discuss new plug for bacon 



tilt's combination. But they've added 
something new. They let their prod- 
ucts speak for themselves in a new type 
of air-selling technique. 

The company's show is Win-0, a 
musical quiz program. At commercial 
time, the program m.c. fries Wiltshire 
bacon in the studio so the sizzling can 
be heard over the air. The firm knows 
the commercial is reaching its audience 
because of the show's catchy format. 

Program calls for listeners to guess 
the titles of tunes and mark them on a 
Win-0 card. So far, over a quarter of 
a million cards have been distributed 
in the WERE area. As for the sizzling 
bacon commercial reaching the quar- 
ter of a million Win-0 players, the pro- 
vision people say it's selling plenty of 
bacon. * * * 



WBRY, Conn., show sells free enterprise 



A four-and-a-half minute show on 
WBRY, Waterbury (and four other 
stations), is successfully explaining 
America's profit system to the people 
of Connecticut's Naugatuck Valley — 
and entertaining them as well. The 
Naugatuck Valley Industrial Council is 
selling free enterprise on the local lev- 
el in the manner sponsor recently sug- 
gested for national advertisers. ("M- 
day for sponsors," 18 December 1950.) 

The Council began its series of pro- 
grams four years ago and those con- 
nected with the show are proud of the 
fact that it never sounds the same. Now 
presented on Tuesdays from 7-7:05 
p.m., the show starts in a different 
manner each week. 

Over the years it has opened with a 
circus barker, a magic set, a fairy tale, 
a man being shot out of a cannon, a 
private eye, a comic Dutchman, an au- 
tomobile mechanic, an on-the-spot re- 
porter, a football announcer. 

Each show expresses just one idea — 
the operation or significance of some 



facet of the profit system. The same 
subject treated in the broadcast is near- 
ly always covered in a newspaper ad 
which the Council runs to coincide with 
the broadcast. 

The broadcast's language is kept 
simple, but great care is taken to keep 
the script from sounding condescend- 
ing. All this effort is being rewarded. 

Charles L. Eyanson, president of the 
sponsoring Naugatuck Valley Indus- 
trial Council, says: "There's no ques- 
tion that the series is acquainting the 
people of this highly industrial section 
with the important role industry plays 
in their lives. It has made the people 
of the Valley aware and sympathetic 
of the problems that face industry. 

"Most important of all, the program 
has given us a voice: a chance to ex- 
plain many aspects of the American 
economic system that are too often mis- 
understood. 

"As far as we of the Council are 
concerned, it is a complete success." 

• • • 



78 



SPONSOR 



Radioed invitation 
draws over 3,000 guests 

The Kotarides Baking Company ra- 
dioed a Christmas party invitation to 
3,500 program friends and over 3.000 
showed up. Kotarides is convinced of 
radio's pulling power now. 



S4£$fife£2& 




Junior firefighters on-stage stars at radio show 

This Norfolk baking firm sponsors 
the Firefighters program on WCAV. 
They decided a Christmas party for the 
Junior Firefighters Brigade, a club 
composed of young program listeners, 
would be ideal on two counts. It would 
build goodwill and. at the same time, 
help determine the show's popularity. 

WCAV was the only means of pro- 
motion for two weeks prior to the oc- 
casion. Then came the turnout which 
more than filled a local auditorium. 
Twenty-five members of the school pa- 
trol; 15 firemen; six policemen, and 
six of WCAV's personnel were re- 
quired to hold the more than 3,000 
youngsters in check. 

A two-and-three-quarter hour enter- 
tainment featured Santa Claus, a fire 
demon, contests, and a radio show plus 
a gift package for every person attend- 
ing. In addition, a hillbilly band and 
a magician were on hand, and prizes 
and official flags were awarded to the 
junior fire companies. * * * 



Advertest reports viewing 
cuts into sleep 

While daytime TV is the topic of 
much discussion (see section page 33), 
televiewing after 11 p.m. is also under 
study. Advertest Research reports the 
following findings after interviews in 
a sample 763 TV homes in the New 
York TV reception area: 

1. 74.8% of all TV families watch 
video after 11 p.m.. at least one night 
a week. 

2. Late evening viewers watch TV 
programing an average of 4.1 nights 
weekly. 

3. Two-thirds of the time now de- 



voted to late evening televiewing comes 
from time previously spent sleeping. 
A third has come from such activities 
as reading, visiting, and radio listen- 
ing. 

A further breakdown shows: 

Activity Before I I Now 

TV Viewing _ 74.8% 

Sleeping 63.2% 15.3% 

Reading, visiting, radio 

listening - 36.8% 9.9% 

• • • 

Briefly . . . 

A new idea in "co-op" advertising is 
being put to use by WAGA. 

WAGA and WAGA-TV, Atlanta, and 
Leigh Foods, Inc.. N.Y., have combined 
forces for something new in "co-op" 
advertising. Both are sending the sea- 




WAGA executives beam at co-op spectacular 
son's greetings by means of a Douglas 
Leigh "spectacular" at Broadway and 
46th Street. Flamingo Frozen Juice 
and the stations' trademark, a Scotty, 
are highlighted on the 5,000-light sign. 
A similar sign is set up atop an Atlan- 
ta hotel. 



WHK, Cleveland, evidences what it 
calls "a million dollars worth of faith 
in AM radio." It's their new $1,000,- 
000 radio center covering over 105,600 
square feet and housing United Broad- 
casting Company and WHK adminis- 
trative offices. Seven studios and mas- 
ter control are under one roof and 
cover 3,000 square feet. 







Million-dollar radio center houses WHK studios 



29 JANUARY 1951 



79 





TOM HARKER. v.p in charge 
of Fort Industry's national 
sales office in NY, is telling 
time buyers this week that 
WGBS now has 34. 1 % 
of the total Greater 
Miami radio audience... 
45.7% ahead of the 
second station. 
That's real leader- 
ship, says Tom. 



IS 



From the desk (\ 

of TOM HARKER: W 



Radio listening is UP in Greater 
Miami . . . and only WGBS 
can deliver the lion's share of 
530,000 local folks, over a 
million- in rich booming South 
Florida. Make WGBS your first 
choice for top sales results. 




MIAMI FLORIDA 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 29 January 1951 

(Continued from page 2) 

24 MARKETS HAVE OVER 100,000 TV HOMES— 

Analysis by Weed & Co., station rep, shows 24 
areas with 100,000 TV homes or more. New York 
has about 2,000,000; another market 850,000; 
one 800,000; one 750,000; one 650,000; two 
400,000; one 300,000; 4 250,000; 3 200,000; 9 
100-150,000; 4 75-100,000; 17 50-75,000; 9 
35-50,000; 6 20-35,000; 2 10-20,000; one under 
10,000. 

PHONEVISION NEEDS PLENTY OF "SCRAMBLING"— 

When Chicago tests of Phonevision (pay-as-you- 
see television) were started in 300 homes before 
turn of year only pictures were scrambled. But 
general TV audience has taken to listening to 
clear sound and following "jittered" image as 
best they can, so future tests will "scramble" 
both sight and sound. Reports Commander E. F. 
McDonald Jr. , Zenith president and Phonevision 
inventor: "Up to this point we are greatly en- 
couraged by the progress of this very first 
commercial trial of such a system of box office 
television. " 

RADIO ADVERTISING CLAIMS CONSERVATIVE— Ac- 

cording to FTC, which monthly reports percentage 
of advertising messages set aside as possibly 
"false and misleading," radio consistently 
shows best media record. Average month's radio 
suspects are about 2.5%; average month's TV 
about 3.75%; average month's newspaper and 
magazine about 5%. 

TV STATIONS CLAMPING DOWN ON MAIL ORDER— 

Abuses of TV mail order advertising has caused 
most stations either to restrict mail order to 
handful of reliables or establish rigid stand- 
ards. Among first to insist on standards were 
WNHC-TV (New Haven), WPIX (New York). Some, 
like WJAR-TV (Providence), W0I-TV (Sioux City), 
won't accept mail order. WBKB (Chicago) re- 
quires advertiser put up $25,000 bond. 



80 



SPONSOR 




In the Northivest... 




In Minneapolis-St. Paul alone, during Class A 
listening periods, seven nights a week. WCCO gets 
an average quarter-hour rating of 14.5 . . . on the 
average delivers 30% more families than hoth 
Twin Cities TV stations combined during Class A 
viewing periods! (Pulse: Nov.-Dec. 1950) 



is I times 
bigger 



Here's proof: All told. 50,000-watt WCCO reaches 
894.600 radio families (50-100% BMB Nighttime 
Listening Area). . .seven times more than the 
127.390 set-owning TV families reported hy Pulse 
for the TV service area. 



& costs 9 times 




Based on Twin Cities ratings, one WCCO Class A station break, 
for example, costs 73<F per thousand families delivered . . . 
nine times less than the average ($6.50) cost-per-thousand of 
a full Class A station break on the two TV stations. (On a 
year-round basis WCCO's cost-per-thousand averages only 53") 1 .) 



ian television ! 




■ 



SEE WEED 




k*** 



i**** 




WHBQ— IN THE SOUTH'S 
GREATEST MARKET 




Reader inquiries below were answered recent- 
ly by SPONSOR'S Research Dept. Answer! 
are provided by phone or mail. Call MU. 
8-2772; write 510 Madison Ave., New York 22. N. Y. 



Q. What are the latest figures on the number of families owning 
radio sets as compared to television set owners? 

College student, Denver 

A. According to a year-end statement by Robert E. Kintner, 
ABC president, 95% of the nation's 42,843,800 families are 
radio families. And, with some 9,845,300 sets installed, televi- 
sion now reaches nearly 24% of the country's families. 

O. Where can we get information on the financial operation of a 
small station including details on overhead costs, and approxi- 
mate annual profit in towns of 5,000 to 15,000 population? 

Radio station, Jackson, Miss. 

A. If you are a member of the National Association of Broad- 
casters, this type of data can be obtained from them. Write to 
NAB in Washington, D. C. 

O. What have you done on TV, in booklet form, that would be use- 
ful to a large advertising agency in England? 

Radio station, New York 

A. sponsor's "199 TV Results" (capsuled TV success stories) 
and "TV dictionary for sponsors" should be of interest to them. 

Q. Do you have any stories about TV sets sold through radio adver- 
tising? Network librarian, New York 

A. See "Not so mad Muntz" in our 7 November 1949 issue; 
"This team bats .500 in sales," 14 August 1950. Also Radio 
Results in the 31 July and 25 September 1950 sponsor. 

Q. Have you published any articles on the use of institutional ad- 
vertising on radio during World War II? 

Advertising agency media director, Cleveland 

A. See the 11 September 1950 issue of sponsor, "A sponsor's 
view of World War II," and 18 December 1950 issue, "M-Day 
for sponsors." 

Q. How long has Roundup been a regular SPONSOR feature? 

Advertiser, Minneapolis 

A. Roundup was started with our 24 April 1950 issue and ap- 
pears regularly in every issue. 

Q. Have you written any stories on the use of radio/TV by under- 
takers? Radio station, Fitchburg. Mass. 

A. sponsor hasn't carried any stories on the successful use of 
broadcast advertising by undertakers. ABC has rigid objections 
to accepting advertising from cemeteries selling plots and MBS 
has never accepted such advertising, sponsor's "How times have 
whanged!" in the 4 December issue mentions in brief Conesloga 
Memorial Park on WGAL-TV, Lancaster, Pa., and several Cali- 
fornia TV stations accepting cemetery advertising when it was 
tastefully done. We suggest you contact WGAL-TV in Lancaster, 
and the Southern California Broadcasters Association in Holly- 
wood for further details. 



82 



SPONSOR 




IS THE STATION 



THAT COVERS ALL 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 



LI K E A 




* 



// is a fact that you could buy }H stations 
in Southern California and not get 
the power, the coverage, or the listening 
audience that kmpc alone will give you. 



K M P C lo* AtujeLl • 7/0 KG 



In KMPC's 50,000- watt half millivolt coverage area are 
5,472,411 people; 1,538,533 radio homes; 1,187,088 car radios. 
50,000 WATTS DAYTIME, 10,000 WATTS NIGHTTIME. 

John F. Patt, President, R. O. Reynolds, V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

REPRESENTED BY H-R REPRESENTATIVES 
AFFILIATE, LIBERTY BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



29 JANUARY 1951 



83 



ALKA-SELTZER STORY 

{Continued from page 27 I 

chairman of the board and still active 
at 76: Walter Beardsley, president: 
Oliver B. Capelle. sales promotion 
manager; H. S. Thompson, advertising 
manager; and L. E. Waddington, ra- 
dio/TV director. 

Out of the jumble of shifting pro- 
grams, a pattern of two trends run- 
ning side by side is discerned: news 
broadcasts and. until recently, enter- 
tainment with a rural tone. 

News broadcasts were first used on 
a spot basis until the sales response 
indicated that it was time to move to 
larger weapons. The next step was 
purchasing the 9 p.m. news show on 
the Don Lee network in 1936. By 
1941. Miles* experience justified sign- 
ing for NBC's News of the World with 
|,,lm \ andcrcooL This program, now 
featuring Morgan Beatty as the com- 
mentator, is worth about $2,500,000 in 
drug sales for Miles, according to trade 
estimates. During the latter part of 
the war the new approach was supple- 
mented by adding the Robert St. John 
show. St. John gave a personality slant 
to the news with portraits of outstand- 
ing figures. 

After the Barn Dance, the outstand- 
ing show in the Miles rural program- 
ing trend was Lum and Abner. The 
Elkhart firm began sponsoring these 
two comedy storekeepers of Pine 
Ridge, Ark.! in 1941 on ABC. That 
same year, this show became the first 
commercial account for the Keystone 
Network. Transcriptions from the 
ABC broadcasts were run over 150 
Keystone stations in the areas where 
there was no satisfactory ABC cover- 
age. At the end of the first 13-week 
period, Miles made a check on these 
Keystone stations by offering a photo 
of Lum and Abner. Two hundred re- 
quests per station would have been 
considered satisfactory. More than 
62,000 were received. In stating that 
the way to reach rural audiences was 
through rural stations, Keystone cited 
a study made by the Nielsen Drug In- 
dex staff. This survey showed that the 
rural station cities were 28% ahead 
of all other markets after the 26-week 
local in-town-station broadcasts for 
Miles. 

In 1947, however, the Keystone time 
was dropped for Lum and Abner and 
the primary coverage shifted from ABC 
to CBS. The next year Miles aband- 
oned the program completely, concen- 



trating on shows with a broader ap- 
peal. This year the only "small town" 
phase of Miles radio advertising is a 
series of Nervine announcements. They 
are only a minor part of the broadcast 
budget. 

Despite the passing of the corn cob 
pipe from their shows, that WOWO 
sign-off melody "Back Home in Indi- 
ana" can still be associated with the 
company, sales promotion manager 
Capelle says, "Miles official representa- 
tives, by common consent, maintain the 
status of friendly, small town workers 
who look with great respect upon big 
city contemporaries while never deign- 
ing to imitate their methods." 

Still, the company can hold its own 
with any big city slicker in utilizing 
research. Schwerin is usually busy, 
either pre-testing new shows for them, 



or finding out what's exciting about 
the programs and commercials they 
are now using. For example, Miles' 
daytime serial Hilltop House was ex- 
posed to Schwerin audience test 
groups. Their reactions showed that 
authors Add) Richton and Lynn Stone, 
had unusual skill in depicting children. 
To the writers this meant that episodes 
focussing on youngsters had the strong- 
est emotional impact. 

Alka-Seltzer's lone TV show Quiz 
Kids I which remains on radio in a 
separate version ) came under the same 
scrutiny. The smartest and quickest 
of the mental prodigies, the favorites 
of radio, had to give way. The small, 
five-year-old who missed answers stole 
the show. TV's emphasis on personal- 
ity spelled the difference. A valuable 
tip for the advertiser was that the Quiz 





*TIME BUYERS MAKE A 
STRATEGIC HIT TOO... 
WHEN THEY BUY THE 
TREMENDOUS PURCHASING 
POWER OF KEYSTONE'S 
SMALL TOWN & RURAL MARKETS! 



i 



84 



SPONSOR 



Kids, both on radio and TV, is par- 
ticularly liked by grandparents. (Miles 
is now extending this TV effort with 
announcements in 13 top markets on 
an 18-week schedule. ) Even the News 
of the World was improved despite the 
somber state of the world described 
in the broadcasts. Simplify ing the lan- 
guage, it was found, brought large au- 
dience increases. 

Audience testing provided Carlton 
Morse, creator of One Mans Family, 
with data on the relative popularity of 
various members of the famous Bar- 
bour household. The 15-minute dra- 
matic series is heard across the board 
over NBC 7:45 p.m.-8 p.m. 

Miles also watches audience reac- 
tions on commercials. Should the mes- 
sages be in jingles, dialogue, or 
straight delivery? When should the) 



be inserted during the program? 
Schvveriri has to provide the answers. 

The Elkhart firm has been working 
with A. C. Nielsen since the earl) Thir- 
ties when it became one of the pioneer 
users of the Nielsen Drug Index. Wli n 
the marketing research agency began 
measuring radio audiences eight years 
ago, Miles became one of the first cli- 
ents for this service, too. 

Never one to rest back with just a 
good share of the market, the Indiana 
drug firm is always curious about 
those radio listeners who do not hear 
its advertising. (Thirty-one million out 
of 42 million I .S. radio families week- 
ly hear the Alka-Seltzer message. I 
Nielsen is asked to evaluate the special 
characteristics of this group, and once 
the answer is worked up the Wade 
agency looks for the program that will 



A STRATEGIC HIT! 




Leading National, blue chip advertisers are discovering every 
day that KEYSTONE'S affiliated stations produce results when 
you want to reach the high purchasing power of the small town 
and rural markets! And, according to BMB studies, these small 
home town stations produce the highest listener-loyalty. 

The Keystone Broadcasting System has more than 400 Stations 
ready to take you into this tremendous market . . . RIGHT NOW! 
And there's not a single KBS station located in a TV-station city 
. . . KBS is beyond effective TV! 

Write today for information on the only established 
and growing Transcription Network . . . where one 
order only buys an attractive and productive package! 



KEYSTONE BROADCASTING system, inc. 

580 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. • 134 N. LaSalle St., Chicago 



*^- 



appeal to that audience. 

Nielsen makes use of the fixed sam- 
ple group of homes where his audime- 
ters are installed for the consumer in- 
dex. A pantry audit among these fam- 
ilies shows what listeners become cus- 
tomers for the drug company. Miles 
Learns how its sales in particular areas 
compare with the competition through 
the Nielsen Drug Index which records 
the movement of goods across drug 
counters in a 60-day period. 

Such data is not only related to ra- 
dio advertising. The drug firm also 
checks on its car card, magazine, and 
newspaper usage (about 10-15% of its 
promotion budget I. Miles was a hea\ \ 
user of car cards during the Thirties 
but has since tapered off in this direc- 
tion. But year-round cards in major 
cities are still the most outstanding of 
their kind, featuring top notch car- 
toons and jingles. 

Newspapers and magazines, which 
have always had a place on the Miles 
ad budget, were used last year to help 
introduce two new products. Tabcin, 
an anti-histamine. and Bactine, an an- 
tiseptic. Tabcin gets a heavy play in 
the newspapers, mostly large city dail- 
ies, during the cold and hay fever sea- 
sons. 

In addition to its fame as an adver- 
tiser, Miles is known as the father of 
fair trade legislation. This drug firm 
has been in the forefront of the fight 
for retail price maintenance for a gen- 
eration. The late Edward S. Rogers, 
the company's legal counsel, had an 
important role in the writing of one of 
the first fair trade laws, the act passed 
by California in 1933. 

This aggressive spirit has distin- 
guished the Miles operation through- 
out its 66-year history. Add to this the 
powerful air advertising techniques de- 
veloped during the last 18 years and 
the epic story of Alka-Seltzer shows no 
sign of diminishing. The chapters to 
come in future years should be at least 
as significant. * * * 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

{Continued from page 6) 

ing is that "action" results, and people 
love action. Mad-dog killers, largely 
unexplained and largely unmotivated 
foul deeds evidence not "action" in the 
story but intellectual "inaction" in lazy 
writers of low-grade literary invention. 
The smarter sponsors are catching wise 
to the racket of pandemonium used in- 



29 JANUARY 1951 



85 



T 



stead of plot, choking sound effects in- 
stead of playable scenes. 
* * * 

Television news programs are bene- 
fiting, along with radio news programs, 
by present revival of sponsor interest 
in news as an audience-getter but the 
fact remains that like many a TV quiz 
show the TV news shows are essen- 
tially "verbal," gaining not too much 
from the addition of sight. The trade 
still awaits the genius who can break 
out of the "verbal" and into the "vis- 
ual" in indigenously TV technique. 
Here you get a quaint twist on the 
newsreels which were faster, fuller and 



more satisfying "silent" I with insert- 
ed captions) than ever since with a 
running sound track. * * * 



TWA TAKES TO THE AIR 

I Continued from page 31) 

sponsor learned. 

Yet, with more scheduled airlines 
prosperous than ever before, they 
have taken a virtual "ceiling zero" at- 
titude toward broadcast advertising. 
The majority of scheduled airlines can- 
vassed by sponsor said they were 
spending about 80 to 90% of their ad- 
vertising appropriations on newspaper 




WSBT 



GIVES YOU BONUS COVERAGE! 



The South Bend-Mishawaka trading area — all by itself — is 
a market worth covering. Over half-a-million people live 
in these eight counties alone. They spend nearly half-a- 
billion dollars a year on retail purchases. 

And that's just pari of WSBT's primary coverage! The 
entire primary area takes in Wz million people who spend 
nearly $1/2 billion a year. That's what we mean by bonus 
covi rage! 

Want your share of this big, rich bonus? It's yours with 
WSBT, the only station which dominates the entire market. 

PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




SOoo 



and magazine space, and devoting i 
pittance of 5 to 15% to radio/TV an 
nouncements — "only when we have 
something to talk about." 

Typical was the response of Ameri 
can Airlines, the biggest domestic op- 
erator, which spends less than 5% of 
its $l,000,000-plus advertising budget 
for broadcasting. Said James Dear- 
born, advertising director: "I'd say we 
didn't spent over $20,000, at most, on 
radio last year. We use announce- 
ments only when, for example, we want 
to report we're putting on D-6 coaches. 
To us, broadcast advertising is a spe- 
cial occasion thing." 

In the aviation field at large, there 
were two notable exceptions to this 
rule (quite apart from TWA). 

One is Eastern Airlines, which boasts 
of spending "more for broadcast ad- 
vertising than any other domestic 
scheduled airline." Currently, it spends 
$400,000-plus annually for announce- 
ments on 40 radio stations in 17 cities, 
plus a TV program on WAGA-TV, At- 
lanta. 

The other exception embraces the 
non-scheduled airline field. These mav- 
ericks of aviation (individually pica- 
yune in size compared to scheduled 
airlines) have been spending twice as 
much, in ratio, for broadcast advertis- 
ing as their bigger brothers. Consider 
these three cases: 

1. Major Aircoach System, Inc. (an 
airline as well as a ticket agency), has 
abandoned all other media to spend 
$125,000 on broadcast advertising. It 
uses radio/TV announcements in New 
York, Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles, 
and Miami. Account executive Sig 
Shore, of Cavanaugh-Shore, Inc., New 
\ ork, says: 

"Some 75% of our traffic is brought 
to us by radio. When Major Aircoach 
started using broadcast advertising in 
January, 1950, it was grossing $2,500 
to $3,000 a week. Today, it's close to 
$15,000. And "we know broadcast ad- 
vertising is responsible, because not 
only do we query each passenger 
where he heard about our service; we 
ask him what station he heard it on." 

2. Safeway Skycoach Agency, Inc., 
which handles ticket sales and advertis- 
ing for 14 non-scheduled airlines, re- 
portedly spends more than $1,150,000 
on radio/TV announcements annual- 
ly. It's on radio in 40 cities and TV 
in eight cities. Its clients include such 
lines as Arrow Airways, Miami Air- 
lines. Peninsula Air Transport, and 
California Eastern Airways. Says 



86 



SPONSOR 



Safeway 's advertising director, Jack 
Barnes: "Radio/TV has done more 
than anything else to bring non-sched- 
uled airlines' message to the mass pub- 
Ik." 

3. Flying Irishman Airlines, Inc., 
spends $1,000 a week alone for six 
daily one-minute radio announcements 
on WINS in New York. (It has also 
been advertising on WMCA and WOR 
in New York.) Says Joseph Besch, 
publicity director for WINS: "Flying 
Irishman is so aggressive, that it even 
advertises, 'If you don't have enough 
money to buy a plane ticket, borrow 
from us, and pay us back in install- 
ments'." 

In the light of this background, 
TWA's role as the leader of the avia- 
tion industry can be viewed more 
clearly. Why is it burgeoning forth in- 
to network advertising? And what ef- 
■ feet will this pioneering step have on 
the other aviation sponsors? 

The first question can be answered 

simply in the words of Sam J. Henry, 

Jr., assistant advertising director of 

'TWA: "(a) We've grown up in spot 

radio, found it valuable, and now we 

want to reach a wider audience, (b) 

' A network radio show, like Mr. and 

' Mrs. Blandings, is designed for the 

whole family. It'll help us reach the 

family trade — especially in big cities, 

where our scheduled and non-sched- 

' uled airline competition is stillest, (c) 

'TWA has always been the bellwether 

of the airlines, and we've found that 

pioneering pays dividends." 

An examination of TWA's spot ra- 
dio/TV history clearly reveals that, 
: while the company has been a trail 
' blazer, it has not rushed in to pioneer 
without taking preliminary precau- 
tions. It has always felt its way ahead 
' carefully. 

"Look before you leap has been our 
policy," says George Bushfield, TWA 
account executive at Batten, Barton, 
Durstine & Osborne. "Back in Janu- 
ary, 1947, we asked Alfred Politz Re- 
search, Inc., of New York, to test the 
announcements on several stations in 
St. Louis. Some legitimate TWA an- 
nouncements and some bogus TWA an- 
nouncements were first played in the 
homes of listeners as a check on the 
confusion factor. Then after the legiti- 
mate announcements were on the radio 
for two months, Politz made his sur- 
vey of the St. Louis public. He found 
that 46% of the audiences had heard 
the legitimate TWA announcements on 
the air. 

29 JANUARY 1951 







95th MARKET IN 
THE UNITED STATES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, capital city 
of Alabama, is the hub of one of the na- 
tion's top markets; the South's most pro- 
gressive industrial and agricultural center. 

TRADING AREA POPULATION 
OF OVER 600,000 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, whose city 
population alone totals 107,000, dominates 
the rich surrounding trading area of 1 1 ex- 
panding counties. 

$133,890,000 
CITY RETAIL SALES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, had city 
retail sales in 1950 that were $5,000,000 
above those of the previous year; proof 
that this market is the "fastest growing 
area in the South." 



Wrife, Wire or Phone tor Availabilities! 



NBC 

WSFA 

Represented by 
Headley-Reed Co. 




CBS 

wcov 

Represented by 
The Taylor Co. 


MONTGOMERY 
NETWORK 
STATIONS 

ASSOCIATION 






MUTUAL 

WJJJ 

Represented by 
Weed & Co. 


ABC 

WAPX 

Represented by 
The Walker Co. 





87 



"We knew then that national -|><>t 
announcement advertising was for us." 

Since then. TWA probably has used 
more widespread radio/TV announce- 
ments than any other single trans-con- 
tinental-international airline. In 1950. 
it spent about $250,000 for radio an- 
nouncements on 45 stations in 18 cit- 
ies; and TV announcements on 45 sta- 
tions in 18 cities; foreign language 
broadcasts on 50 stations in 25 cities; 
and TV announcements on 14 stations 
in three cities. 

The spread of TWA's one-minute ra- 
dio announcements is revealed in this 



breakdown of a typical months station 
list la total of $11,488.84 spent on 39 
stations in October. 1950) : 

KGGM and KOB. Albuquerque; 
KFDA. KLYN, Amarillo; WCFL, 
WIND, WJJD. Chicago; WCKY, 
WCPO. WSAI, Cincinnati; WBNS. 
WCOL. Columbus; WHIO. WING. 
Dayton; WFBM. WIRE, WISH, In- 
dianapolis: KCMO. Kansas City; 
KFAC, KFWB, KMPC. KNX, Los An- 
geles; WAVE, WINN. WKLO. Louis- 
ville; WNEW, New York City; WFIL. 
WPEN, Philadelphia; KOOL, KTAR, 
Phoenix; WCAE, WWSW. Pittsburgh; 



WBNS gives you this 
rich portion of sales 
producing Ohio. , 





This is o big chunk of prosperous Ohio 
territory you sell when you advertise on 
WBNS. There ore 187,980 WBNS families 
with. on income of -$1,387,469,000. WBNS 
covers the market at lower cost to 
advertisers. 

A test will prove to you that you get the 
best results in central Ohio radio when the 
station is WBNS. 

ASK JOHN BLAIR 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



POWER WBNS 5000 - WELD 53,000 - CBS COLUMBUS, OHIO 



KWK, St. Louis: KJBS, KFRC, KSFO, 
San Francisco; and WINX, WRC. 
WWDC, Washington, D. C. 

TV announcements have been re- 
stricted to stations in three cities: 
WENR-TV, WGN-TV, WBKB, Chica- 
go; KECA-TV. KNBH, KTLA, KTSL, 
Los Angeles; and WABD, WCBS-TV, 
WJZ-TV, WNBT, WOR-TV, WPIX, 
New York. (Present plans call for a 
series of five-minute TV travelogue 
programs emphasizing TWA's service 
to London, Paris, Rome, and other Eu- 
ropean points, as well as U. S. vaca- 
tion areas. I 

What has been TWA's strategy in 
the selection of radio stations for an- 
nouncements? Mary Ellis. TWA time- 
buyer for BBDO, puts it this way: 

1. Load your heaviest radio ammu- 
nition in those cities where airline com- 
petition is heaviest. 

2. Seek a combination that will fur- 
nish y©u with the highest frequency at 
the lowest cost. ("Minutes on indepen- 






SEU 



CLOTHING] 




LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 

113 W. 57th ST.. NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 



.Wluvri Calibre Programs at JCocal SlatioH Cost 



88 



SPONSOR 



dent stations often give us better value 
than chainbreaks on higher costing net- 
work affiliates. Utilizing both high 
power and low power stations in a sin- 
gle city proved good for our purposes 
in many cases.") 

3. Use stations whose audiences are 
close to TWA on-line cities. ("Few 
people will travel 200 miles to get to 
an airport.") 

4. Employ stations in those cities 
where TWA passenger business needs 
bolstering. For example, if TWA's vol- 
ume was good from Los Angeles to 
New York, but showed signs of slump- 
ing in the opposite direction, it would 
be logical to boost radio announce- 
ments in New York. 

TWA's sales pitch has been equally 
astute. The local announcements have 
been geared to local conditions; not to 
praise of the airline's institutional pres- 
tige. Parenthetically, it might be said 
that the commercials, supervised by 
Robert Foreman, vice president in 
charge of radio copy at BBDO, usual- 
ly are sent to stations with this warn- 
ing: "Please do not schedule a TWA 
announcement adjacent to a newscast 
in which there is news of an aircrash. 
We will okay a makegood if you sub- 
mit it to us for approval." 

Generally, TWA's announcements 
have been tailored to fit specific needs 
of the market. A typical one-minute 
announcement for listeners to Chica- 
go's foreign-language stations, WSBC 
and WGES, presents this sales pitch: 
"TWA offers a special 15-day round- 
trip to Italy for as little as 10% more 
than regular one-way fare! For in- 
stance, it's only $563.35 round-trip 
from Chicago. Or you can also stay 
as long as 60 days at big savings! And 
you're just 20 hours and 50 minutes 
away from the U. S. . . ." 

In January, February and March — 
when air vacation travel naturally de- 
creases — TWA hypos sales with a 
pitch for its special "quickie vaca- 
tions." A typical message delivered 
from KCMO, Kansas City, read, in 
part: "If you're a bit weary of winter 
along about now, I really don't blame 
you for wanting to get away from it 
all 

"Well, you can, on a TWA Quickie 
Vacation ! Yes, a Quickie Vacation in 
the Southwest Sun Country that you 
can enjoy in as little time as a long 
weekend, thanks to TWA speed and 
TWA flight frequency. By TWA Con- 
stellation, you'll be in Phoenix in just 
five hours, 55 minutes. And Los An- 

29 JANUARY 1951 



«■ COVERAGE 



WITH A 



+ 



REGIONALLY 



WGY and only WGY with its powerful 50,000 watts serves 53 counties 
in 5 northeastern states. Included in this tremendous coverage picture are 21 
major metropolitan markets each with 25,000 or more people within its retail 
trading area. 



HOOPER SHOWED IT . . . 


. BMB M'KOYED IT 




HERE THEY ARE 








NEW YORK 








ALBANY 


HUDSON 


NORWICH 


SARATOGA 


AMSTERDAM 


JOHNSTOWN 


ONEONTA 


SCHENECTADY 


GLENS FALLS 


KINGSTON 


ROME 


TROY 


GLOVERSVILLE 






UTICA 


MASSACHUSETTS 


VERMONT 




ADAMS 


PITTSFIELD 


BARRE 


RUTLAND 


NORTH ADAMS 




BENNINGTON 


BURLINGTON 



. . . add to this the home counties in which these 21 cities are located and you 
have a richly concentrated market of 2,980,000 people with spendable incomes 
in excess of 3 billion dollars 



LOCALLY 



In the 1 1 county area recognized by the Commerce Department of the 
State of New York as "The Capital District", the actual BMB county by county 
breakdown showing the percentage of radio families comprising a stations weekly 
nighttime audience is as follows: 



COUNTY 


WGY 


STATION A 


STATION B 


STATION C 


ALBANY 


90% 


82% 


63% 


67% 


COLUMBIA 


M% 


32% 


25% 


35% 


FULTON 


87% 


22% 


"% 


22% 


GREENE 


87% 


19% 


29% 


36% 


MONTGOMERY 


«% 


31% 


16% 


21% 


RENSSALEAR 


88% 


88% 


53% 


55% 


SARATOGA 


%% 


57% 


4S%" 


45% 


SCHENECTADY 


9'% 


77% 


54% 


52% 


SCHOHARIE 


97% 


43% 


— 


16% 


WARREN 


91% 


— 


19% 


18% 


WASHINGTON 


93% 


32% 


30% 


29% 



With a BMB average of 90% WGY leads its closest competitor by more 
than 45% for the combined 1 1 counties of New York State's Capital District. In no 
instance does any area radio station surpass WGY in the number of nighttime 
listeners — even in home counties. In daytime listening one station enjoys a 
slight margin in only one county. Here is the actual station by station comparison 

TOTAL WEEKLY AUDIENCE 
DAY NIGHT 

STATION WGY (50,000 VJ) 428,160 451,230 

STATION A (5,000 W) 163,910 171,940 

STATION B (10,000 W) 107,910 113,360 

STATION C (1-5,000 W) 115,510 121,220 



WGY 

A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 



So remember, for com- 
plete coverage of a vast 
53 county area plus con- 
centrated coverage of New 
York State's 3rd market, 
the Capital District, your 
best radio buy is WGY. 



89 



Should've 
Used 



WREN 

T P E K A 




ABC 

5000 WATTS 



WEED & CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



KFVD 





LOS ANGELES 



90 



geles in just six hours from Kansas 
City. . . ." 

Other sales messages highlight low- 
cost travel by Constellation Skycoach 
or mid-week bargain family rates — all 
designed to convince the listener that 
air travel is not a flossy rocket-to-the- 
moon expedition, but a convenience as 
natural and as safe as boarding a trol- 
ley. 

Stanley Mortimer, assistant TWA ac- 
count executive, points out that TWA 
has one unique advantage as an adver- 
tiser: it is able to check up daily on 
its national sales. If a certain flight is 
booked heavily in advance or if pas- 
sengers are turning their backs on that 
flight, the airline knows about it right 
away. Quite often, TWA can adjust its 
local sales pitch to meet this situation. 
For example, two weeks before Christ- 
mas in 1950, TWA's low-cost Skycoach 
out of New York was booked ahead 
solidly. Consequently, changes were 
made pronto in the TWA announce- 
ments coming three times weekly over 
Martin Block's Make Believe Ballroom 
program on WNEW, New York. In- 
stead of promoting just Yule Skycoach 
passage, the message extolled the gen- 
eral virtues of TWA as an airline sys- 
tem. 

Interestingly enough, TWA's new 
network show, Mr. and Mrs. Blandings 
(taped from Hollywood and starring 
Cary Grant and his wife, Betsy Drake, 
at an estimated time-talent cost of 
$20,000 weekly), will fuse the advan- 
tages of both local announcement and 
mass network coverage. 

The first two commercials will go to 
all 61 of the NBC stations; the initial 
message will sell TWA's service and 
equipment as compared to other air- 
lines; the middle message will sell air 
travel generally, as compared to other 
modes of transportation. However, the 
third message will be directed to a split 
market. On 24 stations, there will be 
a local cut-in and the message will sell 
local TWA service; the remaining 37 
stations will carry a general commer- 
cial concerning TWA's virtues. 

"In this manner," says assistant ad- 
vertising director Henry, "we gain 
prestige and hard-hitting, nuts-and- 
bolts selling, too. True, an additional 
announcer will have to be available to 
deliver the local sales pitch at the 24 
stations. But the flexibility thus pro- 
vided is well worth it. The way we 
figure it, we'll reach a larger selective 
audience on an economical cost-per- 
thousand basis." 

SPONSOR 



What effect will TWA's expanded 
broadcast advertising exert on the rest 
of the industry? It's probably too soon 
to make any predictions. However, 
from what sponsor was able to deter- 
mine, the move will likely induce oth- 
er reluctant airlines to increase their 
broadcast advertising appropriations. 
An official of Northwest Airlines, which 
covers 36 cities, pointed out: "We'll be 
spending fairly substantial sums from 
our $1,250,000 advertising budget in 
1951 for radio/TV for the first time. 
Up till this year, we used a few radio 
announcements in Pittsburgh and An- 
chorage, Alaska. Whether we've been 
influenced by TWA, I can't say." 

More to the point was the comment 
of a spokesman for American Airlines: 
"You can bet your boots we'll be ex- 
amining TWA's success or non-success 
in network radio very keenly." 

With TWA winging ahead, avia- 
tion's ceiling zero on national air ad- 
vertising may soon change to ceiling 
unlimited. * * * 



WHAT TREBOR DOES 



4°* 

LOCAL ACCOUNTS 



TREBOR'S STATION 

(WVET) 



can do for YOU in 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



Trebor (Daybreaker-Best 
by Request) sells out on 
WVET because Trebor 
"sells" — and so does 
WVET. ..at low rate, too. 




SOB TREBOR 



IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



NEWS SPONSORSHIP 

(Continued from page 25) 

ed media." 

So widespread has been the recent 
stampede into radio news timebuying, 
sponsor learned, that it's becoming in- 
creasingly difficult to buy choice news 
spots. (Generally, as a rule of thumb, 
the best news time spots are those verg- 
ing on the hours 7 a.m., 12 noon, 6 
p.m. and 11 p.m.) 

However, because of the burgeoning 
demand, most networks and radio sta- 
tions are increasing their new -< upl- 



and news commentaries. If the pros- 
pective sponsor exercises discretion, he 
can still pick up a good ncu> buy. 
Here are just a few selected at random 
by SPONSOR. 

Network : 

Many sponsors are by-passing a 
good bet in the purcbasc of half-hour 
or hour-long news-in-review periods. 
These network package- diamatical- 
ly edited and eommentaried. wi:h tape 
recordings from around the world — 
offer as much entertainment and in- 
formation as a Time or Newsweek. An 
< viting example is the new CBS' Ed 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PtfMi&e/l RADIO STATION 



Jfacv Matty Si Jfacu Muck? 



1949 BMB 

Daytime 

50-100% 
19 Counties 

25-100% 
27 Counties 

10-100% 
36 Counties 



BMB Radio Prelim. Reports 1949 

Families 1950 U. S. Census Retail Sales 



101,680 517,587 279,752 



157,110 814,186 452,784 



216,220 1,115,996 610,207 



1949 BMB 

Nighttime 

50-100% 
10 Counties 

25-100% 
22 Counties 

10-100% 
31 Counties 



72,050 
128,350 



360,853 
654,711 



232,657 
373,006 



188,540 972,052 538,598 

RETAIL SALES FIGURES, "000" OMITTED ARE FROM SM MSI "SURVEY OF 8UYING POWER" 

The WDBJ listening habit began in 1924 — and 
has enjoyed continuous Columbia Network service 
since 1929. 




29 JANUARY 1951 



91 



To 



One 




ion 



People 
CBS 

Means 




DURHAM, 
North Carolina 

5,000 WATTS 

620 K.c. 

PAUL H. RAYMER, REP. 

92 



Murrow '"magazine for the ear," Hear 
It Now (Friday, 9-10 p.m.). 

Although a program of this sort 
costs a sponsor $1,138,000 annually 
for time, plus an additional $11,600 
weekly for talent, it would seem well 
worth while. The two half-hour sus- 
tainers which it replaced, Broadway 
Is My Beat and Up for Parole, had rat- 
ings respectively of 7.7 and 7.9 — each 
ahout two points higher than commer- 
cial programs at similar times on op- 
posing networks. (The show will ob- 
tain its first rating next month.) On 
a typical program, the listener is apt 
to hear on-the-spot reports by eye wit- 
nesses of the U. S. Marine evacuation 
from Korea, dubbed-in voices of Ber- 
nard Baruch, the Duchess of Windsor, 
Carl Sandburg. Branch Rickey, theatre 
reviews by Abe Burrows, a "profile" 
of a current headline figure, a news 
analysis by Don Hollenbeck, and m.c. 
narration by Edward R. Murrow. 

Other networks have similar good 
buys. NBC's Voices and Events (.6.30 
to 7:00 p.m., Sundays) costs about 
$5,000 to $6,000 weekly for talent, the 
time cost depending on the number of 
stations employed. This one is edited 
and narrated by James Fleming; high- 
lights the use of on-the-spot tape re- 
cordings taken by NBC correspondents 
throughout the world. Amusingly, Joe 
Myers, NBC's manager of news and 
special events, tells of the time corre- 
spondent Peter Murray dispatched 
from Taigu a tape recording wrapped 
around a Blatz beer can, "because 
we're short of spools in Korea." Also, 
of the time NBC tape-recorded an in- 
terview with an American major in- 
side the Capital Night Club in Korea. 

A hootchy-kootch dancer at the night 
club lisped into the tape-recording ma- 
chine, "I love the major." 

"For heaven's sakes! Don't tell my 
wife about this!" hollered the major 
frantically. And the delighted listen- 
ing audience heard it all over Voices 
and Events. 

A counterpart on ABC is This Week 
Around the World (3:00 to 3:30 p.m., 
Sunday), edited and narrated by John 
Daly, with tape-recordings from ABC's 
three Korean correspondents, Ray 
Falk. Richard Rendell and Fred 
Sparks. This one costs about $7,000 
for time and $2,000 to $3,000 for tal- 
ent, on a weekly basis. Don Coe, news 
editor for ABC, points out that, al- 
though the network's newscasts are 
pretty well sold out, a sponsor would 
do well to buy, on a co-operative basis, 



time with such news maestros as El 
mer Davis and Martin Ogronsky. (The 
timebuying would be done through lo- 
cal stations or their representatives.) 

Mutual, which boasts a 20% in- 
crease in the sale of news time since 
the Korean conflict started, also is 
proud of what it calls "the biggest co- 
op buy in radio commentators" — Ful- 
ton Lewis, Jr. He has over 300 spon- 
sors. Mutual still has some 15-minute 
network newscasts open for sale (about 
$7,500 for time and talent) and five- 
minute newscasts (about $42§ and up 
for time and talent.) 

The comment of Mutual's radio news 
director, Milton Burgh, is significant: 
"If a sponsor buys radio news, he 
knows he has it all over TV news or 
black-and-white. 

"Our Washington man, Bill Hen- 
ry," he adds, "was on the air 20 min- 
utes after the attempted assassination 
of President Truman with the full sto- 
ry. How long was it before the TV 
newsmen had the same event on vid- 

O 55 

eor 

Local Radio Neivs: 

Good news buys on local stations 
are still abundant, depending on the 
sponsor's ability to select. W. B. Jen- 



WABB 

AM 5.800 Witts 



ALABAMA'S 

BEST 

BUY 



PROMOTION PLa ! 

YvMDu on your order list repre- 
sents Alabama's Biggest Bonus! 
On WABB you are assured of con- 
sistent, planned promotion . . . 
immediate and continued accept- 
ance of sponsor identification! 

CHECK THESE FIGURES 
FOR A RECENT MONTH 

• 32,858 Lines of Newspaper 
Advertising 

(Sponsors were identified in 
about half) 

• 8,9 75 Lines of Newspaper Edi- 
torial Mention 

(The equal of about 4 full pages) 

• Regular Air Promotional An- 
nouncements 

(Supplementing network build- 
ups) 

• PLUS —Point of Sale Posters 

• PLUS —Dealer letters galore 

• n J TJ C — Personal contact on 

the local level 
Add WABB to your "MTJST" list 
now! Join the sponsors who are 
now receiving 1 each month their 
WABB program promotion kits 
through their friendly Branham 
man. 
AMERIC AN BROA DCASTING CO. 
Owned and Oper- 
ated by the Mobile 

Press Register 
Nationally Repre- 
sented by The 
Branham Company 



1 



111 



FM 50.000 Watts 



SPONSOR 



l|HH|||B||BQ|^H| 



' 



nings, sales manager assistant at WOR, 
New York, points out: "WOR news is 
a profitable purchase because we've 
built up a reputation for news. Be- 
cause of the hypoed buying, we've in- 
creased our news schedule." A 15-min- 
ute newscast in the daytime at WOR 
costs about $330 for time and talent, 
and 15 minutes' of a commentator like 
Gabriel Heatter about $576. 

An amazingly wide coverage can be 
obtained, sponsor found, by buying 
news time on local stations like KFYR, 
Bismarck, N. D., or WNAX, Yankton. 
S. D. In an area sparsely covered by 
newspapers, the WNAX coverage ex- 
tends to North Dakota, western Minne- 
sota, and part of Iowa and Nebraska. 
Time and talent cost for a 15-minute 
newscast three times weekly: $75. 

News listening to 1,000-watt WFDF 
in Flint, Michigan, reflects the need for 
a sponsor to investigate his market be- 
fore he buys. Since Flint is an indus- 
trial town (the home of Chevrolet and 
Buick), its inhabitants work on a 
round-the-clock shift basis. Oddly, the 
peak news listening period, it has been 
found, is 4 a.m. to 6 a.m. Time and 
talent cost for a five-minute newscast: 
$75. 

A station affiliated with a newspaper 
can often be an asset to a sponsor, be- 
cause the audience is aware that it's 
getting a bonus share of "live news" 
not taken off the wires. Four cases 
are KGNC, Amarillo, Texas, whose 
news department is headed by Wes Iz- 
zard, editor-in-chief of the Amarillo 
Nmvs-Globe; WKJG, Fort Wayne, In- 
diana, affiliated with the Fort Wayne 
Journal Gazette; WBEN, Buffalo, New 
York, affiliated with the Buffalo Eve- 
ning News; WDSU, New Orleans, La., 
affiliated with the New Orleans Item. 

A sponsor benefits most of all, SPON- 
SOR learned, if he chooses a radio sta- 
tion that has a news staff. Otherwise, 
as Oliver Gramling, assistant general 
manager of the Associated Press, 
points out, "chunks of copy are torn 
off the teletype machine, and read by 
the announcer raw. And when there's 
no re-writing done, you get no local 
news slant, no reference to the local 
weather, no individualistic news style 
that will distinguish that station, or 
that announeer. In other words, the 
sponsor loses the full value of his news 
timebuying." 

Happily, largely as a result of the 
National Association of Radio News 
Directors, an increasing number of ra- 
dio stations are building up full- 




TOP-RATED or 2nd PLACE 

quarter hours between 6 A.M. 

and 8 P.M. than any other 

BALTIMORE RADIO STATION* 

i 

Again and again we've proved it — 

WFBR is Baltimore s Best Buy for 
sales-minded advertisers! The headline 
tells its own story. For amplification, 
explanation and demonstration, ask your 
John Blair man — or in Baltimore, call 
for a WFBR salesman! 

Naturally, WFBR-built shows like Club 
1300, Morning in Maryland, It's Fun 
to Cook, Nelson Baker Show and 
others have a lot to do with that ARB 
report. Ask about them, too! 

*Monday thru Friday, Oct. -Nov. 1950 ARB Report 




ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE, MD. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



29 JANUARY 1951 



93 



w 



r more 



*Headley-Reed 

will give you full 
details of the 

many national 
advertisers selling 
on WHIM. 



1,000 WATTS 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



fledged news staffs. More of them, too. 
are employing the facilities of two, 
rather than one, news wire service. 
(Currently, Associated Press, for ex- 
ample, services 1,100 stations.) 

A list of the local stations that have 
built up competent news departments 
would fill a full issue of sponsor. A 
random handful might include Pea- 
body -Award -winner WOW, Omaha, 
Nebraska, which has a news staff of 
eight ;WGAR, Cleveland, which head- 
lines newsman Jack Dooley; KCMO. 
Kansas City, a 50,000-watter, with 
triple-threat news editors Harold Mack. 
Leon Decker and Jim Monroe; KLZ. 
Denver, which uses wire and tape-re- 
corders and four full-time news editors. 

Others are KWKH, Shreveport, La.; 
WWL, New Orleans; WTOP and 
WWDC. Washington, D. C; WFBR 
and WCAO, Baltimore; WRNL, Rich- 
mond, Va.; WDNC. Durham, N. C, 
and WPTF, Raleigh. N. C; WBT, 
Charlotte, N. C; WCBS, New York; 
WCAU. Philadelphia; KNUZ, Hous- 
ton,, Texas; and WTAR, Norfolk, Va. 

Finally, assuming that a sponsor has 
selected his time and station, what 
strategy should he use in programing? 

sponsor herewith submits the for- 
mulas employed by three veteran news 
sponsors. Although some of their 
points overlap, the tips may help new- 
comers to the field : 

(a) Peter Paul, Inc., which will 
spend over $1,000,000 this year for 15- 
minute news programs on 80 individ- 
ual stations, including the Columbia 
Pacific Network; a user of spot radio 
news since 1937: 

1. Don't start a news period from 
scratch. A news period that has been 
on the air for at least two years will 
have developed an audience. 

2. Buy news program originating on 
individual stations. They provide lo- 
cal news slants and local weather re- 
ports which can't be obtained from a 
network news program originating in 
New York. 

3. Use 15-minute news programs 
since they develop more faithful audi- 
ences than five-minute newscasts. 

4. Let the newscaster stick to report- 
ing the news and the announcer to sell- 
ing the product, and let neither mix 
their duties. 

5. Write the news script with an 
eye to the personality and particular 
style of the news broadcaster. 



*NEWS 
DIRECTORS 



At its recent convention The 
NATIONAL ASSOCIA- 
TION Of RADIO NEWS 
DIRECTORS awarded to 
WOW a plaque for . . . 

' OUTSTANDING PREPARATION 

AND PRESENTATION 

OF THE NEWS" 

• When 400 men in the 
same profession agree that 
WOW'S news presentation 
is the best, it MUST be 
good. 

Last year the WOW NEWS 
DEPARTMENT broadcast, 
to the more than 485,000 
families in WOW-LAND, 
77,237 news stories, an in- 
crease of 1,785 stories over 
the previous year. 

RIGHT NOW NEWS is 
the Hottest Advertising 
Buy in Radio . . . 




NEWS 

is the 

NATION'S 

BEST! 



RADIO 



aWa 



OMAHA 



FRANK P. FOGARTY, General Manager 
JOHN BLAIR CO., Representatives 



94 



SPONSOR 



6. If possible, buy newstime before 

9 a.m., in order to get the whole fam- 
ily home. 

(b) Esso Standard Oil Company, 

which will spend over $1,000,000 this 
ear for five-minute newscasts over 53 
rations in 18 states and Washington, 

D. C. ; user of radio news since 1935: 

1. Identify the newscaster only as 
'Your Esso Reporter," since you wish 

to sell the personality of the product 
rather than that of the announcer. 

2. Buy time on local stations rather 
an on a network basis. It's easier to 

gear the commercial copy to the de- 
mands of the local market. A winter 
lubrication appeal in Maine won't go 
with WLAC's audience in Nashville. 
Tenn. 

3. Squeeze the commercial in after 
the concluding "teaser"' in the news- 
cast, "Your local weather report will 
follow in just a moment." 

4. Select local stations that have an 
organized news bureau, a regional ra- 
dio wire, and preferably both AP and 
UP wire services. 

5. Use five-minute newscasts, four 
times a day, six times a week, at the 
periods most persons are at home — 8 
a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. Ad- 
just the time periods according to the 
market habits. Since the citizens of 
Nashville tend to go to bed earlier, 
take the 10 p.m. rather than the 11 
p.m. time slot. 

(c) Shell Oil Company, which uses 
five-minute to 15-m':.ute newscasts 
over 57 local stations; a news sponsor 
since 1944: 

1. Use local stations, because of the 
flexibility provided in handling com- 
mercials in widely differing geographi- 
cal areas. 

2. Use spot radio news in order to 
match radio coverage with the com- 
pany's own direct territories. (Shell is 
not national on the retail level. In some 
areas, it sells to distributors who mar- 
ket the products under their own 
brands.) 

3. Never let the newscaster indulge 
in commentary, for fear of irritating 
listeners whose opinions may be op- 
posed. 

4. Buy news shows that have built 
up top ratings. 

5. Use five-times a-week newscasts 
at time periods verging on 6 p.m. and 

10 p.m. to reach the biggest male au- 
dience. * * * 

29 JANUARY 1951 




He rings a bell 

with cash-register echoes 

The miniature Liberty Bell on his mantel symbolizes a 
point of view shared by millions of his listeners. That's 
one reason why his nightly analyses of the news from 
Washington establish a rapport with his audience which 
rings cash-registers for his sponsors . . . and brings in 
folding money too! 

As Mr. Joseph P. Wortz, vice-president of the Security 
Trust Company, wrote to Station WAMS, both of Wil- 
mington, Delaware: 

"We have received letters of commendation regarding 
our sponsoring of the Fulton Lewis, Jr. program and 
we feel that we have written considerable new busi- 
ness as a result of this particular program." 

The Fulton Lewis, Jr. program, currently sponsored on 
more than 300 stations, offers local advertisers a ready- 
made audience at local time cost. Since there are more 
than 500 MBS stations, there may be an opening in your 
locality. Check your Mutual outlet — or the Cooperative 
Program Department. Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, NYC 18 (or Tribune Tower, Chicago 11 ) . 



95 






if... 



California — the nation's Second 
Retail State — is your market . . . 

and . . . you recognize that 
SUCCESSFUL RADIO 
ADVERTISING demands local 
tie-in MERCHANDISING . . . 



you 



• • • 



ABSOLUTELY CANNOT 
OVERLOOK the Pacific 
Regional Network, your 
Best Salesman in 
California . . . 

because... 

the Pacific Regional Network, 
the nation's most flexible 
sales and merchandising 
radio station network . . . 

. . . offers to advertisers 

(1) network time purchase of 
any or all of 49 separate 
California AM radio stations; 

(2) outstanding programming; 
and (3) LOCAL radio sales 
promotion in all its ramifica- 
tions ... at substantial savings 
in time, effort and money. 

For details write, 
wire, or phone 



PACIFIC 

REGIONAL 

NETWORK 



6540 SUNSET BOULEVARD 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 

TED Mac MURRAY 
Sales Manager 




CLIFF GILL 
General Manager 



HI. 7406 



PITTSBURGH NEWS STRIKE 

(Continued from page 29) 

BOA Statement 

rnent Store Economist (January, 1951). 
which termed the strike's effects on 
business "unexpected" and "fantastic": 
"Without newspapers, stores used cir- 
culars, direct mail, billboards, subur- 
ban weeklies, radio and TV. . . . When 
the strike was over, the big stores 
were reported to have spent as much 
for the makeshifts as they had bud- 
geted for newspapers, at a loss of 12' < 
of sales. ... As to television, many ob- 
served that it fails to provide needed 
detail and the opportunity for com- 
parisons — the lack of retention of in- 
formation, much like radio advertis- 
ing. As one commented: 'When you 
see it in the paper, there it is in de- 
tail and you can shop from it; when 
you see it on television, where is it?' ' 

Women s Wear Daily reported on 26 
October: "The stores have resorted to 
substitute methods of promotion which 
are held to be costly and not as pro- 
ductive of results, for the cost, as are 
newspaper ads. . . . Radio advertising 
is held not to have the impact that 
newspaper ads have. . . ." 

And again, in Women's Wear Daily 
of 20 November, just as the strike end- 
ed: "All available advertising and pub- 
licity directors said they were resum- 
ing their normal newspaper promo- 
tions. . . . Several indicated they would 
immediately switch their budgets back 
to newspapers rather than continue 
with radio and other substitute media. 
... It is generally held here (in Pitts- 
burgh) that the newspaper strike 
showed that radio is not an effective 
media (sic\ for lasting impression 
either editorially or promotionally. 
. . . Circulars were deemed a most ex- 
pensive and ineffective method of pro- 
motion." 

Pittsburgh's strike was costly — to 
business, to the community at large, 
and, naturally, to the newspapers. 
But it compensated for a good portion 
of that cost by providing a gigantic 
laboratory for the proper evaluation of 
America's daily newspapers. * * * 

BAB Statement 

burgh broadcasters subscribed to one 
or more of the news services from 
which the newspapers themselves ob- 
tained the news. For more extensive 
local coverage, 25 reporters on the 
strikebound papers were hired by the 




It's 

Teleways 



^^ 



99 



for 



SUCCESSFUL 

Transcribed 

Show* 

Transcribed and ready to broadcast: 

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 

156 IV nun uit' top western musical pro- 

grams 

DANGER, DOCTOR DANFIELD 

26 half-hour exciting mysteries 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

156 15-minute shows with the King*s Men 

singing hymns of all faiths 

MOON DREAMS 

158 15-minute romantic musical programs 

BARNYARD JAMBOREE 
52 half hours of good hill-billy music 

STRANGE ADVENTURE 
260 5-minute stories of interesting adven- 
ture 

OR 

Custoiu-Built 
Transcribed Shows 

For Free Auditions and Prices Write 



TELEWAYS 



RADIO 

PRODUCTIONS, 

INC. 

8949 SUNSET BOULEVARD 

HOLLYWOOD 46, CALIF. 

Phones: 

CRestview 67238 • BRadshaw 21447 

In Canada: Distributed by S. W. CALDWELL, LTD. 
Victory Bldg., 80 Richmond St. West, Toronto 



96 



SPONSOR 



stations. The only people who did not 
know what was happening in Korea 
were those few who were too lazy to 
turn on their radios or those who be- 
longed to the very small group of un- 
derprivileged (3.9%) who did not 
own sets. Mayor David L. Lawrence 
said, "I need not point out that for 
many weeks during the fall we were 
without our three daily newspapers. 
The extra news service which radio 
provided at that time kept the citizens 
of this area informed of the happen- 
ing of local, national, and worldwide 
importance." 

The pull of radio was vividly dra- 
matized by attendance at sports events. 
Attendance during the football games 
of the Pittsburgh Steelers on 7 Octo- 
ber and 22 October were sellouts, with 
thousands turned away. Even the clash 
with the lowly Baltimore Colts pulled 
23,500. There were no thousands of 
inches of sport-page copy publicizing 
the advance sale of tickets. The club 
had to rely on its radio advertising. 
And it paid off. 

Radio is the primary mass medium 
of the land. In Pittsburgh, 96.1% of 
all homes have one or more sets in 
good operating condition. That "city 
in the dark" phrase was a figment of 
a copy writer's imagination. It was as 
substantial as the other newspaper 
propaganda. * * * 



510 MADISON 

{Continued from page 16) 

1 of people I have been associated with 
in Canadian radio stations all share 
sincere enthusiasm for your magazine. 
C. A. Brian Scharf 
Sales Manager 
CHUB 
Nanaimo, B. C. 



As an appreciative subscriber to 
SPONSOR, which is greatly looked for- 
ward to by our sales staff, we would 
like to take advantage of your very 
generous offer of free copies of the 
Jaro Hess caricatures. 

May we in closing offer our sincere 
i thanks to SPONSOR for its major part 
in making radio selling a professional 
operation. 

Michael Hopkins 

Manager 

CKLB 

Ohsaiva, Ontario 

29 JANUARY 1951 



NEW OR 

TODAY 
it 5 



EANS /\l/ 



BEAMED TO THE MASSES . . . features tops in Hill- 
billy, Race and popular DJ Shows . • . 

TOPS IN PERSONALITIES . . . nationally famous disc 

jockeys . . . Harry "Mush Mouth" O'Connor 

"Okey Dokey"* Bob Murphey • • • 

BIG COVERAGE . . . LOW COST ... 1000 watts con- 
centrated coverage in rich 100-mile New Orleans 
area ' * * 

plus FULL MERCHANDISING AND PROMOTIONAL 
SUPPORT FOR YOUR PRODUCT . . • 



OJ<! 

OJ<! 

OJ<! 
OJ<! 



•Copyright WBOK, 1950 



Mifctffc 



1000 WATTS 

800 ON YOUR DIAL 



INCORPORATED 

"NEW ORLEANS' O^X! STATION" 
Stanley W. Ray, Jr., Gen. Mgr. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY FORJOE & CO. 



ABC 



COrA^ vll L E 
IN 



ouis 




WK^LO 



Louisville, Ky. 

JOE EATON, MGR. 

Represented Nationally by 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 




A single announcement on 
KQV now has one client's 
sales staff working overtime. 
This sponsor wanted to sell 
a $225 Home Fire Extin- 
guisher system. We advised 
him to buy Jane Gibson, who 
broadcasts daily at 1 :40 PM. 
From a single sales pitch, 
Jane produced 143 leads! 
Ask Weed & Company about 
Jane Gibson for your client. 



KQV 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MBS — 5,000 Watts — 1410 



97 



We spent 
$250,352,000 
for food 
last year! 




When "soup's on" in Arkansas, 
it's a real feast. A feast for 
you, too, if your food products 
are advertised on KVLC. Ark- 
ansas women listen to KVLC. 
They buy products they hear 
advertised there. So tel! 'em 
and sell 'em over KVLC. Get 
your bite of the $250,352,000 
Arkansas food bill. Ask our 
nat'l rep or write for avail- 
abilities. 



Could you supply me with six or 
seven copies of your television diction- 
ary for sponsors. Since we are pre- 
paring to inaugurate television in Can- 
ada, your booklet would be useful to 
us. I would be interested to get also 
all other information that you are pub- 
lishing about television. 

Miss Florence Forget 
Director of Television Programs 
Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 
Montreal 



MR. SPONSOR 

Thanks for the very fine piece about 
Douglas Leigh in your 4 December is- 
sue. All of us around the office here 
enjoyed reading it. 

MlLBURN McCARTY Jr. 

Vice President 

Leigh Foods Inc. 

New York 




WHOD'S NEGRO D.j. 

I read your article on Negro disk 
jockeys and I regret that your maga- 
zine didn't even mention Mary Dee. 
She has a two-hour show daily on 
WHOD in Homestead, Pa. 

Mary Dee started with a 15-minute 
show and convinced her sponsors she 
coidd do a selling job. Mary Dee 
Movin Around from two to four p.m. 
daily are the passwords of every Pitts- 
burgher. Here are a few facts about 
her: 1. First Negro woman disk jock- 
ey in the East. 2. Writes her own 
script and sells her own time. 3. Has 
received five awards from community 
groups, churches, schools, newspapers 
and clubs. 4. She was honored with a 
testimonial dinner on 31 August with 
5.000 Pittsburgh notables present. 
Pittsburgh's Mayor said: "Mary Dee 
is a young woman who while pioneer- 
ing has not forgotten to smile and con- 
tinues to work for her race." 5. She 
gives young people an opportunity on 
her talent shows. 

Edward Toke 
WHOD 

Homestead. Pa. 



RADIO, TV MANAGEMENT AUDITS 

I hope that you will find a spot in 
the publication to announce our leav- 
ing the production field for something 
never before offered radio and televi- 
sion stations . . . management audits. 

During the past 10 years "big busi- 



Mr. Lawrence Roberts 
Kiesewetter Associates 
New York City 
Dear Larry: 

Th' big permoshun fer Kroger's 
Share th' Wealth 
'11 shore be in 
th' right place 
here in Charles- 
ton, West Vir- 
gin ny. Yessir, 
Larry, th' home 
town xvo WCHS 
is really rollin' 
when it comes 
ter bizness, an' 
thet's what you 
fellers is inter- 
ested in. Why, 
durin 1950 th' 
local postal re- 
ceipts shattered 
all records, an' 
so did th' biz- 
ness at th' of- 
fice uv th' coun- 
ty clerk. Thet 
means thet biz- 
ness is good in 
Charleston, an' 
with WCHS giv- 
in yuh more lisseners fer less money 
then effen yu'd bought all th' other 
four stations in town, it shore looks 
like a banner year fer Kroger! 
Yrs. 
Algy 

WCHS 
Charleston, W. Va. 




& 



/ 



WTAL 



5,000 Warts Full Time 




John H. Phipps, Owner 
| L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr| 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System 

National Representative 
JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 



Southeastern Representative 
HARRY E. CUMMINGS 



98 



SPONSOR 



ness" has developed methods and 
"tools" to make management audits 
which cover every phase and detail that 
pertain to the organization. After two 
years of study and research we have 
been able to adapt these methods and 
"tools" to our specialized field and an- 
nounce that we are open for consulta- 
tions with stations and networks as 
Management Auditors. 

Briefly, we apply practical and psy- 
chological methods, forms and charts 
to the study and analysis of each de- 
partment ... its operations and func- 
tions, plus an evaluation of the entire 
station personnel (from the boss man 
down) . . . their duties and activities. 
Only after a thorough and complete 
study has been made within the station 
itself and outside in the field it serves, 
do we analyze our findings and submit 
the results and recommendations. 
Cyril Von Baumann 
Von Baumann Studios 
New York 



BACK-SLAP HAPPY 

In your news note of 8 May 1950 
mention was made of a recent sponsor 



BIG and 

INDEPENDENT 




WWDC 

IN WASHINGTON 
National Reps. Forjoe and Co. 



poll showing the ranking of Peabody 

Awards to be slipping to the level of 

some other award. 

I would appreciate it very much if 

you would send me a copy of your 

complete study of awards. 

Nathalie D. Frank 
Geyer, Newell & Ganger 
New York 



• SPONSOR'S award story. "Radio is I,.,. 1,-1 .,, 
happy," appeared in the 27 March I*>50 issue. 



RADIO: GUESSWORK MEDIUM 

"Mitch's Pitch was magnificent." 
So says your excellent editorial "Ra- 
dio guesswork medium" in the 1 Janu- 



ary issue. But, why the past tense? 
Mr. Mitchell, since joining Associated 
Program Service as vice president and 
general manager, has been able to put 
into actual practice, through APS sub- 
scriber stations, those very promotion- 
al and sales ideas for which he, and his 
"Pitch!" became famous. 

You mention that the major sales 
effort (of the pitch) was at the "local 
level." This "local level" is a billion- 
and-a-half dollar advertising market; 
and it was to drive this fact home that 
Mr. Mitchell formulated his sales and 
merchandising plans. To be success- 
ful nationally, any advertising or mer- 
chandising plan should have accept- 








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NOT ONE, BUT SEVEN MAJOR INDUSTRIES 



ance from local businessmen — the peo- 
ple who sell nationally advertised 
products. Hence, the importance of 
strengthening the local picture first. 

But, where "Mitch's Pitch," based 
upon his tremendous experience in 
radio and merchandising, was offered 
through the BAB as pure planning and 
guidance, his continuing pitch for bet- 
ter selling has now been elevated to 
hard, cold practice, as applied to the 
merchandising and selling of programs 
produced from the APS Library. In 
fact, it is applicable to selling of radio 
in general, ET or "live." Such success- 
ful sales thinking while admittedly of 
principal benefit to APS subscribers, 
is sufficiently broad enough, and sure- 
ly contagious enough, to act as a 
leaven to spark the entire industry. 
And this, I might add, "is only the 
beginning." 

If anything, Mitch's pitch is a sharp- 
er, more penetrating instrument than 
previously, chiefly because it can get 
down to specifics. Appropriately 
enough, his new, monthly bulletin is 
titled "THE NEEDLE!" 

Les Biebl 
Program Director 
Associated Program Service 
New York 



Congratulations on your editorial, 
"Radio: guesswork medium." I cer- 
tainly agree 100% with its theme and 
sentiments. 

It has been my hope,, as you know, 
that when we get the BAB properly set 
up on a new and expanded basis, it 
will be able to tell a thoroughly co- 
herent and completely substantiated 
industry story for the first time that 
story has ever been told. 

This is certainly no time, from any 
point of view, to lose confidence in or 
to undervalue the effectiveness of ra- 
dio. 

Robert D. Swezey 
General Manager 
WDSU-AM-TV-FM 
New Orleans 



Both pieces you sent me are very 
valuable to us and I hasten to thank 
you. 

Nobody really knows that radio can 
sell today better than ever, at least it 
is the most value for the advertising 
dollar. 



We operate TV, and very successfu - 
ly, according to the records. Our it - 
vestment is less than other stations an 1 
our programs (both national and lc- 
cal) have a high professional standing. 
Our gross and net compare very fa- 
vorably with anyone else's. 

Yet we continue to look on radio as 
underpriced. We failed to raise rates 
during the years other media were 
costing more, so now we are unalter- 
ably opposed to any rate reductions. 
Probably our daytime radio rates 
should be increased at WSYR, as I 
have done at another station with 
equally intense TV competition. Our 
gross and net are better than ever be- 
fore. 

I agree with you that the advertiser 
and agency have not been sold prop- 
erly on radio as the best advertising 
buy today. Much has to be done in 




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other 5 stations cover the white field), 
GOLD MEDAL joins a marvelous collec- 
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OUT WDIA. 



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Mgr.. Harold Walker, Com'l. 
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Bert Ferguson, 
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JOE ADAMS 

REACHES ALL 

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this direction, as you point out. I 
doubt if most of those selling radio in 
the national field believe in radio as 
thoroughly as they should. 

We here have correctly appraised the 
relative value of TV and radio to the 
advertiser. Both media are tops and 
each has its proper place. 

I hope this word of encouragement 
from one of the old timers will stim- 
ulate you to continued efforts to get 
radio understood and properly evalu- 
ated. 

Harry C. Wilder 

President 

WSYR-AM-TV-FM 

Syracuse 



May I compliment you on your edi- 
torial in the 1 January issue. I think 
your points are well taken, and if your 
suggestions are followed it would be a 
decidedly forward step for the indus- 
try. 

W. V. Hutt 

General Manager 

KLRA 

Little Rock, Ark. 



With my new assignment to BAB, I 
assure you that I will make every ef- 
fort within the limits of funds avail- 
able to do the kind of basic research 
which I personally have for so long 
felt the industry should do. You are 
right. We ought to know the value of 
what we are selling, and the advertis- 
ers should also know the value of what 
they are buying. 

W. B. Ryan 

General Manager 

NAB 

Washington, D. C. 



I can't help but agree with your 1 
January editorial. Like most of my 
friends in the business, I'm morally 
certain that the advertising we sell is 
well worth the price we ask, and in 
many instances much more; but I find 
it very hard to project that conviction 
in the face of inaccurate and mislead- 
ing comparisons with other media, and 
even within the medium itself, as you 
suggest. 

Whether a publicity campaign is the 
answer is hard to say. Naturally, I 
can't help being advertising-conscious, 
but I also know that any advertiser 
must be able to back up his drum-beat- 
ing with accurate facts on what he's 

29 JANUARY 1951 



CLEVELAND'S tfqf STATION • WJ W CLEVELANO'S/^w^T SIGNAL* WJW • CLEVELAND'S Ctefi ST^ 

CHIEF SAYS: | 

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RINGS SALES BELL 

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BILL O'NEIL 
PRESIDENT 




CLEVELAND'S 




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5000 W. 

WJW BUILDING 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 



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JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



selling and proof of its performance. 

You hypothesize a "measurement of 
radio." It's my conviction that in 
many respects radio is too great in 
scope to be measured with much great- 
er accuracy than has already been ac- 
complished. A truly definitive mea- 
surement might be made in Ios An- 
geles, but it wouldn't hold true, en- 
tirely, in Salt Lake City ... it might 
be done in Baltimore, but the results 
couldn't truthfully be fitted over the 
Cleveland mold. 

And a definitive nation-wide survey 
of radio's entire and component im- 
pact would be astronomically expen- 
sive. Even the most eager searcher- 
after-facts would be willing to admit 
that. 

The Cleveland stations have recently 
gotten together and decided to under- 
write the cost of one survey, by the re- 
sults of which we will all abide. Ad- 
mittedly, the survey doesn't take into 
account the extra-set listening, out-of- 
home listening, listening outside the 
metropolitan area, and other potent 
factors. Admittedly, it shades to the 
advantage of some and the disadvan- 
tage of others. But it is a general 
guide, an indication of our individual 
and collective circulation in our mar- 
ket, and we regard it as the largest step 
in the right direction we can afford. 

At our own station, we are making 

as extensive an effort possible to tell 

our story to potential advertisers . . . 

the story of merchandising and promo- 

I Please turn to page 104 1 



MR. SPONSOR 

{Continued from page 10) 

pany. He rose to become vice presi- 
dent in charge of sales for Canadian 
Breweries, Ltd.. before he was trans- 
ferred to the American company in 
1048 in the capacity of vice president 
in charge of sales. Recently he was 
made executive vice president and gen- 
eral manager. 

Strangely enough. Dowie picked up 
his radio advertising know-how in 
Mexico City during his five-year stay 
there. The drug branch devoted more 
than 809? of its advertising budget to 
the medium. "I personally had to han- 
dle the radio advertising," Dowie said. 
"The few advertising agencies that ex- 
isted were small and rather ineffectual. 
The stations not only had the artists 
tied up. but composers as well. We 



«?cfn 



>M 



ro' 



55 




102 



SPONSOR 



couldn't play the same song that had 
been on another station's program. 
There were no writers available, so I 
had to do a large part of the writing 
myself. I not only had to buy the 
time, but I had to produce the show 
which included musicals and quiz pro- 
grams. But I understand things have 
changed since then." 



P.S. 



(Continued from page 121 



sociation ( Committee for Development 
of Government Data), American As- 
sociation of Public Opinion Research, 
American Newspaper Publishers Asso- 
ciation, Inc. I Bureau of Advertising), 
Magazine Advertising Bureau, Inc., 
Market Research Council, Media Re- 
search Directors Association, National 
Association of Broadcasters, and Na- 
tional Association of Magazine Pub- 
lishers, Inc. 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 75) 

Too much emphasis has been put 
on "success" stories in radio rather 
than the specific benefits that it can 
offer as a mass reasonable medium. 
True, success stories are often inter- 
esting and most helpful to national ad- 
vertisers but there are also instances 
where the story has not been one of 
success and advertisers are always 
I ready to point out stories ©f this kind 
to counteract the "beautiful" ones of 
success. 



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BUY THE 

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ESTABLI SHED 1930 



HIGHLY RATED 

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AVG. S PERIODS. WIN. 1990 

ABC STATION 



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1 think the BAB could do an excel- 
lent job with their member stations in 
getting them to present their own sta- 
tion information in a unified form list- 
ing the homes reached both by metro- 
politan market areas and urban and 
rural distribution. This information 
would allow for more rapid market 
and station analyses and comparisons 
and help in the selection of the cities 



in which radio would be most benefi- 
cial to the national advertise*. Along 
with many others, I am anxiously wait- 
ing for BAB to get into operation and 
hope that they do a job that will jus- 
tify radio's efficiency and importance. 
Paul Gaynor 
Vice President 
Buchanan & Co. 
New York 



TOOLS 



available to sponsors 



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Requests for material must be made within 30 days. 



A 140 "Radio News Is Bigger Than 
You Think," Free & Peters, Inc., New 
York — is a 20-page booklet reporting 
the results of a survey among almost 
3,000 radio families. 

AT 41 "Silver Anniversary," WRVA, 

Richmond — points out the progress 
made by station over 25-year period. 
Booklet includes information on staff, 
promotion, programing, and special 
events. 

A142 "Lourenco Marques Means 
Business," Lourenco Marques Radio, 
Johannesburg — reports present and 
probable future cost-per-thousand lis- 
teners to Lourenco Marques. 

A 143 "WMAR-TV," WMAR-TV, Bal- 
timore — is a descriptive and pictorial 
record on the station's third anniver- 
sary. The brochure contains informa- 
tion on remote operations and station 
personalities. 

A 144 "Eat at Joe's," Westinghouse 
Radio Stations, Inc., Washington, D. C. 
— gives facts and success stories on ad- 
vertisers who have used radio stations 
KDKA, KYW, WBZ, WBZA, KEX, 
WOWO, and WBZ-TV. 

A145 "Sales Don't Stop at the City- 
Limits . . . and Neither Does WWL," 
WWL, New Orleans — tells how much 
territory outside New Orleans is cov- 
ered by 50,000 watt, clear-channel 
WWL. 



A146 "An Extra Come-On For 
Your Customers," KTTV, Hollywood 
— explains some of the promotional ac- 
tivities of KTTV in a fold-out brochure. 

A 147 "A Market Study of North 
Vancouver City-District and Port 
Moody," CKNW, New Westminster, 
B. C. — describes early morning and late 
evening listening habits of the popula- 
tion of North Vancouver City. 

A 148 "Television Dictionary," 

American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, New York — includes TV defi- 
nitions in everyday language to help 
readers better understand terms used 
in describing TV and color TV in par- 
ticular. 

A149 "Help Wanted," Free & Peters, 
Inc., New York — describes seven radio 
saleswomen and their programs. The 
16-page presentation lists the advertis- 
ers who have used them successfully. 

A 150 "Guide to Layout and Re- 
duction of Art for Television," 
KMYV, Omaha — is a four-page guide 
that lists "do's and dont's" in prepar- 
ing artwork on TV. 

A151 "Report to Advertisers and 
Advertising Agencies," WOAI-TV, 

San Antonio — is a summary of answers 
received from a postcard questionnaire 
mailed to 5,080 television set owners 
in the San Antonio area. 



SPONSOR 

510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 

To obtain any of the tools listed, place check in boxes pi A] 41 
to right. 



COMPANY 



ADDRESS 



CITY & STATE 



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29 JANUARY 1951 



103 




510 MADISON 

{Continued from page 102) 

tion . . . the story of actual results . . . 
the factual story of our market and 
coverage as far as accurate facts are 
available. 

Whether an industry-wide effort with 
these same tools and directed at these 
same ends is a feasible thing. I'm not 
any more prepared to predict than you. 
It goes without saying, that if a work- 
able plan were devised to pre-measure 
the effectiveness of an advertisers pro- 
posed radio budget, I'd be as anxious 
to know about it as anyone else. Un- 
fortunately, I don't think such a mea- 
sure will ever exist for radio. Too 
many diverse and unmeasurable fac- 
tors enter into the success or failure 
of an advertising campaign to be able 
to forecast or guarantee its effective- 
ness before it starts. 

It is my personal conviction that a 
thoughtfully-planned advertisement or 
campaign, designed and prepared for 
the medium in which it's to be used, 
and placed in the most effective vehicle 
or vehicles that medium affords, stands 
the best chance of being successful. 
That formula bolds true for newspa- 
per, billboard, direct mail, consumer 
mag, trade mag, TV and all the rest, as 
well as radio. 

Radio's edge in that formula is that 
we are selling to our advertisers the 
same programs we prepare for our lis- 
teners, therefore we have a very direct 
and sincere interest in the effectiveness 
o! our advertising. The newspaper or 
magazine man is selling one thing to 
his readers, another to his advertisers. 
As far as his basic selling factor, his 
circulation, is concerned, it doesn't 
make am difference whether "X" ad 
or campaign is effective or not. It docs 
to ns. because our circulation is direct- 



ly dependent on the advertising's being 
good. 

Maybe there's a moral in this ram- 
bling account. Newspaper advertising 
gained its preferred "basic" position 
on results, not surveys. The surveys 
came later, as frosting on the cake. 
The same holds true for most of the 
other "basic" media, including radio 
for the long-time national advertisers 
who have used it successfully and con- 
sistently. 

You say the advertiser is willing to 
pay for what he gets, but doesn't know 
what he's getting in radio. If he's get- 
ting results in sales for dollars spent, 
what more does he need to justify his 
budget? And it's been proven here, 
and many other places, that he can get 
results with the formula cited above 
. . . perhaps not miracles, but solid 
sales results that are well worth the ad- 
vertising money allocated. 

I think I stand with most of the ra- 
dio men in the country when I say I'm 
read to prove it any time . . . that we 
are proving it every day ... as an in- 
dustry, have been for 25 years. And 
I think that's the answer. 

Roger L. Albright 

Sales Promotion Manager 

WJW 

Cleveland 



Thanks very much for your ad- 
vanced copy of your 1 January edi- 
torial. 

You remark, "Today nobody knows 
the true dimensions of radio." How 
true! How true! 

Least of all, apparently, we who set 
the rates and peddle time at prices that 
we know are far below the real worth 
of our product. We are controlled al- 
most completely by "tradition" in set- 
ting our rates. Any formulas that ex- 
isted in the beginning of radio to try 
to measure "total sets" — as is being 
done in TV today — or "extent of po- 
tential listening" or any other yard 
stick have long gone by the boards. 
We have set rates based on a few un- 
related factors: 



Letters appearing on this page 
are in response to the editorial en- 
titled: ""Radio: guesswork medi- 
um" (1 January issue of SPON- 
SOR). Many valid suggestions are 
made here; SPONSOR suggests 
that readers scrutinize them eare- 
fully. 



1. Rates of the radio competitors 
in the market. 

2. Estimated costs of operation at 
time of beginning broadcast ac- 
tivities. 

3. Average weekly budget expendi- 
tures already established in the 
area. 

All of the above factors are impor- 
tant but certainly they should not be 
the guiding yard stick for setting rates. 
We hope the entire industry takes 
heed of your editorial and that some- 
how in the immediate future we will 
all equip ourselves to accurately mea- 
sure our audience. 

Eugene D. Hill 

General Manager 

WORZ 

Orlando 



Read your editorial in sponsor en- 
titled "Radio: guesswork medium" 
with a great deal of interest. Person- 
ally. I think it provokes a great deal 
of thought for broadcasters, especially 
relative to rate decreases and measure- 
ment. 

It seems to me that many of us are 
taking a defeatist attitude on AM. We 
should stop apologizing for our rate 
structure. If we do decrease our rates, 
that have been justified and estab- 
lished by market and results, we are 
taking a step backwards and will les- 
sen our prestige for many years to 
come. If it is in the foreseeable future 
to accurately measure radio audiences, 
it behooves us to use such a logical 
research method now as we are only 
muddying the water by all the cut- 
throat sniping regarding rate struc- 
ture and AM and TV measurements. 

Many of us have not had any trou- 
ble getting our rates and we have used 
the true yardstick to justify them, 
which is RESULTS. If the majority 
of the country were TV now, we might 
have a different problem confronting 
us. This not being true as a whole, 
it seems to me that the over-all radio 
picture should not be discouraged to 
the point of having to go along with 
major decreases in rates. 

Here's hoping we continue to go 
forward in selling radio for what it's 
worth and not go along with the few 
who keep trying to back it up! 

Leslie L. Kennon 

Assistant Manager 

KWTO 

Springfield, Miss. 



104 



SPONSOR 







i 



r \ 



Yes, for the second consecutive year, Schuneman's Red Rooster Hour 
has walked away with the N.R.D.G.A. national grand award for the 

finest large department store FAMILY radio program in the nation. 
And, that's no "happenstance"! 

This morning show was originated and planned, just as every 
merchandising program on WDGY is originated and planned, to accomplish two 
objectives . . . service to the community . . . and sales for the advertiser. 

So, if you're "considering" a similar success story . . . with saturation of 
the nation's 9th largest market . . . penetration into more than 800,000 radio 

homes . . . and invasion of a $3,000,000,000 field in retail sales . . . then 
why not let us make you, too . . . the cock of the walk? 



OtUj 

No wonder, the Minnesota efy is on 



ej% is on I 

wclcjy 






50,000 watts 



1130 KC • MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL • REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC 




■■MH ■■■■ 



PULSE 



SHOWS 

WTAG 



with 



488 
'500 



Quarter Hour Wins 



Quarter Hour 
Broadcasting Periods 

THE PULSE, INC. 
OCT.- NOV. 1950 



500-. 






f |V«™ 



V 



488 \ 









250- 






3 -< 

>- 
c - >■ 



- SET 

— I 






.7 L 

So 



£2 






WTAG STA"B" STA"C" STA"D" STA"E" 



HOOPER 

WTAC 



SHOW! 



with 

MORE AUDIENCE 

ALL OTHERSTATIONS 
COMBINED 

HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
OCT.- NOV. 1950 



TIME 



Mon. thru Fri. 
8 a.m. -12 noon 



Mon. thru Fri. 
12 noon-6 p.m. 



Sun. thru Sat. 
6 p.m. -10:30 p.m 



Total Rated 
Time Periods 



WTAG 



43.0 



58.2 



53.2 



51.3 



STA 
"B" 



28.2 



24.3 



16.2 



£2.5 



STA 
"C" 



18.3 



5.7 



12.4 



11.1 



STA 
"D" 



6.1 



5.0 



9.2 



7.6 



STA 

"E" 



3.8 



6.3 



8.1 



6.5 






ma 



By Any measurement, WTAG dominates 



Worcester and Central New England 




WORCESTER 

580 KC 5000 Watts 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO. National Sales Representatives. 
Affiliated with the Worcester Telegram — Gazette. 




:E|JRUARY 1951 • 50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 



The Fabulous 
Columbia Workshop— p. 23 





Columbia 
Workshop 
Blazed Way 

p<iqe 23 

Air Use by 
Hearing-Aid 
Firms Booms 

page 26 

Legs That 
Sell for 
Old Gold 

pa 



How's the 
"Big Show" 
Doing? 

page 30 



Making the 
Most of TV 
Camera 

page 32 

Magazines 
on the Air 

page 34 

How to Sell 
Talent to 
Sales Force 

page 36 

Radio 
Results 

page 38 

Mr, Sponsor 
Asks 

page 42 



Will you give the Industry something 
to smile about this time, Mr. Petrillo? 



ponsor 
Index 



Editorials 



I 



page 







fJJms/v^ \um paid, ward 

1,500,000 % m tkc 

NATIONAL BARN DANCE 

broadcast from Chicago's 8th Street Theatre! 



» 



TODAY'S 

NATIONAL BARN DANCE 

ADVERTISERS 



T iu«ii»* 



Htt-0- fiUSS 



u** s '- 






"Z^n^l 



U ti 



In the eighteen years since the NATIONAL BARN 
DANCE was moved to the 8th Street Theatre 
(it was a studio broadcast for eight years before that) 
2,008,065 loyal WLS listeners have paid $1,462,750 to see 
the program broadcast from this one spot alone — 
an unequalled record in paid admittance for any radio 
program. And with age, its share of audience- 
has increased— in the last year alone, according to 
A. C. Nielsen Company, by 49%. 

It is more than just another program. The NATIONAL 

BARN DANCE is radio's oldest continuous, 

commercial program. It is a tradition — which has 

maintained — and increased — WLS leadership 

in developing loyal listeners — and customers. Its list of 

sponsors is impressive — even more so is the constancy 

of their sponsorship. It has proven and will 

continue to prove that radio is the magic touch 

that turns people into customers. 



\§0* 



U eii\H i" 11 



WLS can introduce you to new customers in the 
rich Midwest. Write WLS, or contact your John 
Blair man today for availabilities and facts 
on how Radio's magic touch can sell for you. 



And now Pequot Mills, Inc., who began 
Vi hour sponsorship of the NATIONAL BARN DANCE late 
last year — another advertiser destined 
to turn people into customers! 



CLEAR 



890 KILOCYCLES • 50.000 WATTS • ABC AFFILIATE • REPRESENTED BY I0HN BLAIR & CO 




>&o*r 



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i^p ^ /s °*s 



'55/ 



WHO'S NIBBLING AT PEARSON? — Surprisingly (in view of Drew Pearson's fracas with 
Senator Joseph McCarthy) one of several firms making sponsorship inquiries is in 
heavy industry, usually most controversy-shy category among advertisers. Among 
nibblers, clothing manufacturer F. Jacobson & Sons flirted with, then abandoned 
idea of alternate-week ABC sponsorship. 

CHECKING THE RATING SERVICES — Blueprint for tests to determine rating services 
doing best jobs included in final report of industry committee initiated last 
summer by Stanley Breyer, KJBS, San Francisco. As proposed, project would re- 
quire sponsorship by industry organization like BAB or BAM at cost of $150,000 to 
$200,000. Would include analysis of full techniques used by Pulse, Nielsen, 
Hooper etc. in reaching findings; might, for example, monitor Hooper phone calls 
to check interviewing methods. 

TV SPONSORS UP 2200% IN TWO YEARS — Rorabaugh Report shows that total of na- 
tional advertisers on TV increased from 238 in June 1949 to 4,832 this past fall. 
Network accounts most active since January 1950 include: 130 food accounts; 29 
automotive; 23 alcoholic beverage; 19 non-alcoholic beverage. 

DOES YOUR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WATCH TELEVISION? — Many account executives, 
other key agency men, fail to keep up with TV programing. That's impression 
SPONSOR researchers have been gathering. Said national food firm account man: 
"I just have time to see our own show." With lightning-pace of newest medium, 
alertness and study will pay extra dividends. Increasing number of tools are 
available, including trade papers and clinics. 



NEWSPR INT SHO RTAGE MEANS MO RE M ONEY FOR SPOT RADIO/TV— Developing short- 
ages of newsprint may mean more money for spot radio/TV budgets. Larger newspapers 
in post-war years, increasing consumption by Great Britain, are among reasons for 
paper shortage. There's grey market already with price at $230 a ton. (Normal 
contract price: $106). 

PBS: $750,000 IN RED — Cost of starting even a daytime network emphasized by suspen- 
sion of Progressive Broadcasting System after less than 3 months' operations. 
Larry Finley, PBS head and respected e.t. specialist, hoped to carry on with new 
funds as this issue went to press. Total dropped to date: $750,000; most for Holly- 
wood programing, large chunk for cross-country station relations tour. 



SPONSOR. Volume 5. No. 4. 12 February 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 12 February 1951 

$75,000 TOTAL EARMARKED FOR TWO TOP NAB EXECS — When Judge Justin Miller 
steps up to chairman of board his $50,000 annual salary will step down. Board 
action permits maximum of $75,000 to chairman and new president-general manager. 
Since president (to be chosen by eight -maa committee) is expected to get between 
$30-40,000 Chairman Miller is anticipating cut. Names mentioned as president- 
general manager possibilities include Ed Kobak, Paul Morency, Gene Thomas. Strong 
NAB elements would like to draft Bob Swezey. Practical broadcaster is sought. 
Selection committee has working list of 40 candidates. 

RADIO PICKING UP IN TV HOMES — In 10 of 13 Pulse TV cities January 1951 radio 
listening was at all-time high in TV homes. City by city, 12 noon to 12 midnight, 
viewing and listening statistics in TV homes for week of 2-8 January were: Bir- 
mingham, TV 25.2-radio 17.5; New York, TV 32.9-radio 15.2; Dayton, TV 30.6-radio 
15.9; Columbus, TV 33.6-radio 15.4; Syracuse, TV 32.3-radio 16.7; Cleveland, TV 
35.6-radio 15.3; Boston, TV 29.0-radio 18.2; Cincinnati, TV 34.9-radio 16.7; 
Philadelphia, TV 30.2-radio 13.4; San Francisco, TV 27.4-radio 17.1; St. Louis, TV 
31.3-radio 18.1; Chicago, TV 33.2-radio 16.4; Los Angeles, TV 30.8-radio 17.5; 
Washington, TV 28.6-radio 11.9. 

HOW MUCH IS ADJACENCY WORTH? — Colgate's high-flying "Our Miss Brooks," (CBS, 
6:30 pm Sundays) competing with NBC's "Big Show," is zooming in ratings. 17-23 
December Nielsen has it in 9th place with 5,698,000 homes. Previous rating showed 
35th place. Jack Benny, in 2nd place with 7,855,000 homes, immediately follows. 
On Monday nights "My Friend Irma" does well at 10 pm immediately following top- 
ranking "Lux Radio Theater." Nielsen rates "Irma" 8th with 5,942,000 homes . 

DON LEE'S NET PARTICIPATIONS — Advertisers like Fels, Best Foods, Hills Bros., 
Pequot Mills, Sierra Candy like novel twist Don Lee inaugurated mid-October for 
participations over entire net via afternoon Jack Kirkwood Show. Don Lee sells 
one-minute commercials worked in by cast at base rate of $275 per. Sellout is 30 
participations weekly. 

RADIO IS GE TTING BIGGER — Among numerous stations whose biggest year was 1950 
were WJR (1950 billing, $3,519,151—1949 billing, $3,274,670) and WGAR (billing 
between $2,000,000 and $1,750,000 in 1950). Stations' managements both expect at 
least 10% increase in 1951. 

ARE TV STATIONS PUBLIC-SERVICE MINDED? — Lengths to which some TV stations go to 
provide useful service seen in WFIL-TV, Philadelphia "University of the Air." 
Class is in session each weekday from 11:10 am to 12 noon with topnotch professors 
conducting and compact curriculum and reading lists available to viewers. KTTV, 
Los Angeles, devotes 20% of total time to educational broadcasts. Judge Justin 
Miller waging fight to convince FCC that educational institutions should be grant- 
ed licenses to operate TV stations "on the merits." FCC Commissioner Frieda Hen- 
nock advocates allocation of 25% of TV frequencies to educational institutions. 



SPONSOR 



Gimme a gross of 

SUPER CORONAS .DEAR ! 



## 




I oronas or Cadillacs . . . our wealthy Red 
River Valley hayseeds have the dough to buy 
almost anything they want. They're one of 
the Nation's top income groups. And they 
prefer WDAY so heavily that they have made 
it the top NBC station, Hooperwise, in the en- 
tire nation ! 

Despite competition by the other three major 
networks, all of tvhich have studios in Fargo, 
WDAY consistently gets a far greater Share 
of the Fargo-Moorhead Audience than all 
other stations combined ! 

WDAY has even greater popularity in rural 
areas. A new 22-county survey reveals that 
78.6% of the farm families within about 90 
miles of Fargo prefer WDAY, as against 
4.4% for the next station! 

Yes, urban and rural, WDAY is the over- 
whelming favorite in the Red River Valley. 
Write for all the facts, today! 




FARGO, N. D. 



NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 

Exclusive National Representatives 




12 FEBRUARY 1951 




rtl\ 



wil 




DIGEST FOR 12 FEBRUARY 195 



VOLUME 5 NUMBER 4 



ARTICLES 



I' hf fabulous Columbia Workshop 

Sponsors know advertising impact is entertainment impact. Here's now 

the Workshop blazed way in developing the art of radio program-making »«* 



How to sell a titan who can't hear 

Beltone's successful venture into network radio last fall aroused other 
hearing-aid manufacturers, started advertising revolution 



26 



Legs ami the girl 

Old Gold Dancing Pack TV commercials have created a mystery: Who's 

the girl on top of those shapely legs? This picture series gives clues «»© 



How's the "Big Show'* tloing? 

Blessed by the critics, NBC's new star-packed extravaganza appeals most 

to big-city sophisticates. Over-all rating is still weak, but growing »" 



Getting the most out of camera ami props? 

TV cameras can produce endless variety of tricks; ingenious use of these 

special effects cuts costs, hypoes sales punch S£ 



Magazines on the air 

Stepped-up TV activity by Life, increased use of radio by SEP, prove that 

giants in the periodical field know hew to make use of competitive media w* 



Does gour star click with gour salesmen? 

Jack Berch, Prudential m.c, has sold himself — and radio — to the sales 

force. His story may suggest an approach for other firms OO 



SPONSOR INDEX: JULY-DECEMBER 1950 49 



COMING 



The fabulous Colttmbia Workshop: part II 

More about the history of the Workshop, with an audit of net results 

and a plan for establishing an industry-supported TV Workshop »b rCb. 



The storg of Firestone 

Sponsor of the oldest coest-to-coast network radio show, this tire and 

rubber company started using air in 1928, now has successful simulcast <*W rCb. 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

NEW AND RENEW 

510 MADISON 

MR. SPONSOR: DANIEL B. SCULLY 

P. S. 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUNDUP 

QUERIES 

TOOLS (BROCHURES) AVAILABLE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



6 
11 
16 
18 
21 
42 
44 
46 
79 
80 




COVER: On 18 March 1948, four network ex- 
ecutives (Frank Mullen, then of NBC, not 
shown) signed a contract with the AFM and 
James C. Petrillo. This year, traditional smiles 
for camera may come harder. Musicians' de- 
mands include: hike for TV musicians to 20% 
over radio scale; virtual ban against showing 
movies on TV. ( L. to r.) Mark Woods, vice- 
chairman of ABC; Robert D. Swezey, then 
executive v. p. of Mutual, now g.m. of WDSU, 
WDSU-TV, New Orleans; Petrillo; Joseph H. 
Ream, executive v. p. of CBS. 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editor: Erik H. Arctander 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Kay Brown (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast 
Manager), George Weiss (Southern Rep- 
resentative), John A. Kovchok (Production 
Manager), Edna Yergin, Douglas Graham 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villanti 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Pulished biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices : 510 Madison Ave., New York 22, 
\ J Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
360 V Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 6-1556. 
West Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Offlse: 3110 Elm 
Ave, Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue. New York 22, N. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



it's easy, 



WHEN YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



For every Radio 
Family in Shreveport 



Ihreveport is the second city in Louisiana and 
WKH is way ahead of all other competition here, 
n Weekday Evenings, for example, Hoopers show 
sat KWKH actually gets 89.7% a * many listeners 
all other Shreveport stations combined! 



: 



t Shreveport alone is no true measure of KWKH. 

e city itself has 33,280 radio families, whereas 
WKH's 1949 BMB Daytime Audience is 303,230 
milies (and 227,701 of these are "average daily 
teners"!) 

;t us or The Branham Company give you all the 
cts about our rich tri-state area and the job that 
OC^KH know-how can do for you. 



SO, 000 Watts • CBS 



f 

KWKH HAS JUNE 

ACTUAL "BMB AUDIENCE" 

FAMILIES, OUTSIDE! 



"V 



M 



f 



f 



f 



ir 



KWKH 



Texas 



^ 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company AflfAWCAC 

Representatives ■*& 

Henry Clay, General Manager 




Dixie's most progressive 
independent radio voice. . . . 



You don't miss the 
BIG, buying audience 
when you buy WPAL. 
Specialized programming, 
beamed to the Negro Market 
and the Eurai Area— 
a Great, Big Audience 
Segment untouched by 
other stations! 
A look at our max! 




Charleston, South Carolina 



contact: John E. Pearson Co., 
or Dora Dodson Agency 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



The agency was about two years old, had about 35 accounts in 
the shop. One month there had been a heady $10,000 profit; an- 
other month a headachy S11,000 deficit. Billings were within binocu- 
lar distance of $2,000,000. But try as he could the founder-owner 
could not himself make a living. Carefully he studied the confiden- 
tial data provided by the American Association of Advertising Agen- 
cies. He had the right number of employes for his volume. His items 
for rent, art, radio research, and so on were correct. 

Then came the grim choice. He could continue on a risk basis 
with the possibility of bankruptcy in six months. Or he could halt 
while the salvage potential was high. With the honorable intention 
of avoiding insolvency's handy exit, he chose the way of orderly 
planned withdrawal. He would thus be out all he had originally put 
up, all he had borrowed, all the salary he might have earned at the 
agency he left to go on his own, and all that he should now commit 
himself to pay off out of future salary. 



Here, you will agree, is decency in business. Unhappily, once he 
was no longer the agency, once he had surrendered his own bar- 
gaining position, a majority of his clients began showing this gen- 
tleman no appreciation whatever for his honorable course. Instead 
"hard-headed" treasurers began to chisel their own obligations to 
the agency. Accounts that had never challenged a charge in two 
years, now did so. One dug back eight months for a transaction to 
complain about as basis for subtracting $5,000 from the book value 
of its own obligation. Other accounts went suddenly "tough" just 
to prove how alert they were, claimed failure to approve copy that 
had run, or wrong insertion, or wrong key number. All of which 
considerably lessened the salvage and increased the agency guy's 
personal burdens. It was as if the "hard-headed" pack had chanted, 
"Fee, Fie, Foe, Fum, We smell the blood of an ad-mun!" 

Not pretty, you say? So say we. 



In the book "This Fascinating Radio Business," written by a cer- 
tain fascinating writer, there is a photograph of a Denver police 
magistrate holding morning traffic court. Quite clearly displayed in 
the photograph are a radio microphone at the judge's elbow and a 
large bottle of castor oil with serving spoon. It was the quaint habit 
of this broadcasting judge to dole out, on occasion, a dose of castor 
oil to traffic offenders who would stand still for such Mussolini-like 
treatment in clear violation of the United States Constitution which 
forbids cruel and inhuman punishments. 

Denver did not invent but may have produced the ultimate carica- 
ture in courtroom broadcasting. Such police pickups were once fa- 
miliar in some 20-odd cities including, as this memory recalls, Cin- 
cinnati. Miami. Atlanta. Omaha. St. Louis. In about half a dozen cases 



Please turn to i><ige 72) 



SPONSOR 



\ 




YANKEE Coverage is ^OCftl, too! 



Any Yankee station anywhere in 
New England is as home-town as any 
local enterprise or utility. It is an im- 
portant cog in community affairs, and 
it provides a quick and friendly means 
of introduction to everyone in town. 

Decidedly, the better way to sell 
New England is to make it a local 
sales job by taking advantage of this 
Yankee acceptance and popularity in 
each market. 



Here is a network audience built 
up over the years, firmly established 
and without rival, because no other 
New England regional network covers 
so great an area or combines so much 
effective local coverage of important 
markets. 

The Yankee Network's 29 home- 
town stations offer you the most effec- 
tive means of building and maintaining 
sales volume in New England. 



/iccefrtaace it THE YANKEE NETWORK'S *?ouad<ztto*t 

The Yankee Network, Inc. 

Member of the Mutual Broadcasting System 

21 BROOKLINE AVENUE, BOSTON 15, MASS. Represented Nationally by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 

, 12 FEBRUARY 1951 7 



/*v2 ^ -b^ 



^ ^ 



n ^ nif 





Hows youi 



TOP R\I)[(). TV STARS WILL FNTKKTAIN NFBA CO! RTESY OF CIIS-HPL 



For tlic second straight year, headline 
personalities from CBS radio and tele- 
vision will stage a huge variety show for 
members of tin- National Food Brokers' 
Association and their friends at the 
annual banquel which climaxes their 
national convention. Tins year's banquet 
will ho held at tin- Palmer House, Chi- 
cago, Februarj 1'). 

"The Housewives' Protective League," 
participating program broadcast locall> 
by cbs stations in ten leading national 
markets, will again pick up the tab for 
this big-name production, in association 
with CBS and Radio Salos. a ens division. 



The CBS-HPL show is being repeated by 
popular demand. Spectators and press 
alike termed last year's show a high spot 
of the Mis \ convention. 

Local lift. Direetors. anil the markets 
covered by each, include the following: 
Galen Drake. WCBS, New York City; 
John Trent. WCAU, Philadelphia: Mark 
Evans, wtop, Washington, and wrva, 
Richmond; Ulen Gray, weeo. Min- 
neapolis; Paul Gibson (The Paul Gibson 
Show). WBBM, Chicago; Lee Adams, 
kmox, St. Louis; Paul West, kiro, Seattle; 
Lewis Martin, kcbs, San Francisco; and 
Philip Norman, knx, Los Angeles. 




lain of demand? 



Customers, like generals, originate orders. And in selling just as in a soldier's 
chain of command, orders eonie through channels. A successful sales effort 
emhraces not only your customers, but your retailers, all your middlemen and 
your own salesmen— your whole chain of demand. If you are one of the 
hundreds of advertisers who have been selling on "The Housewives' Protective 
League," your chain of demand will pass anyone's inspection. Because 
the HPL is radio's most sales-effective participating program ... right through 
each link to you. If you aren't already on the HPL, let the HPL Director 
in your area show you how he hacks up liis on-the-air action with hard-hitting 
merchandising services. .. how he pounds the local dealer-retailer beat 
selling your product ... helps kindle sales enthusiasm with in-person appearances 
at manufacturer, wholesaler and dealer meetings. .. puts out a steady 
barrage of bulletins, postcards and brochures to retailers. .. makes available a 
wide variety of point-of-sale ammunition (such as counter cards, posters, 
streamers and stickers). To put these merchandising weapons — and the HPL's 
own tremendous sales power— to work, just call the HPL Director nearest you. 

THE HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 

"The Program that Sponsors the Product'' 

la:. MADISON AVE., NEW YORK CITY • COLUMBIA SO., HOLLYWOOD 




if WW THE ONLY STATION 
WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



in the ORBCO 



GXXXffl 





BROADCAST MEASUREMEN 
BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSH 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's effici 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area 
reaches more radio families than any other Portlj 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys t 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the populati 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and Soil 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
[From 1949 BMB Survey) 



Nin«ty-one miles north of Portland is Chehalis, major agricultural com- 
munity of southwestern Washington and an important factor in KGW's 
Comprehensive Coverage of the Oregon Market. Chehalis lies directly 
within the range of KGW's north-south directional signal and is com- 
pletely dominated by the station's "beamed broadcasting" This was proven 
by a recent Tour-Test, conducted with the cooperation of the Oregon 
State Motor Association and witnessed by Dennis Hamilton, prominent 
Chehalis turkey grower. He is shown above with "Miss KGW". This rich, 
diversified economy is yours to tap through KGW, the only Portland 
station to offer Comprehensive Coverage of the Oregon Market. 





DAYTIME 
KGW 
Station B 
Station C 
Station D 

NIGHTTIME 

KGW 

Station B 
Station C 
Station D 



350,i 
33", 
295, 
192,1 



367,; 
350,1 
307,! 
205/ 



This chart, compiled from 
cial, half-milivolt contour mj 
filed with the FCC in Washin, 
ton, DC, or from field intent 
surveys, tells the story of KCW 
COMPREHENSIVE COVH 
AGE of the fastest-growing mi 
ket in the nat ion. 



10 



PORTLAND, OREGON 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & 

SPONSOR 



iVeir and r 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



2. New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Consolidated Grocers 
Corp (Reid-Murdoch 
div) 


Weiss & Geller 


CBS 


178 


Doubleday & Co Inc 


Huber Hoge 


NBC 


49 


Culf Oil Corp 


Young & It ill Mr .mi 


NBC 


116 


State Farm Mutual Auto- 
mobile Insurance Co 


Need ham, Louis & 
Brorby 


MBS 




Sterling Drug Inc 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC 


216 


Sterling Drug Inc 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


CBS 


150 


U. S. Army & U. S. Air 
Force Recruiting Serv- 
ice 


Grant 


ABC 


285 


U. S. Army & U. S. Air 
Force Recruiting Serv- 


Grant 


CBS 


181 


ice 









Arthur (Godfrey Time; all days 10-10:15 am; 
6 Feb; 52 wks 

Edwin C. Hill; Sun 11:15-30 am; 1 Apr; 13 

wks 
Counter-Spy; Th 9:30-10 pm; 1 Feb; 52 wks 
Cecil Brown; Sat 7:55-8 pm ; 24 Feb; 52 wks 

News of Tomorrow; Mil. 10:30-45 pni ; 2 

Apr; 52 wks 
Bill Shadel and the News; Sun 3-3:15 pm; 4 

Feb; 20 wks 
Let's Co With Ralph Flanagan; M 10-10:30 

pm; 22 Jan; 52 wks 

Harold Peary Show; W 9-9:30 pm; 21, 28 
Feb; The Line-Up; Th 10-10:30 pm; 1, 8, 
15, 22, 29 Mar 



3 2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


NO. OF NET STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 




H|T Cities Service Co 

i 


Ellington & Co 


NBC 93 


Band of America; M 9:30-10 pm; 22 Jan; 
wks 


52 



3. New National Spot Radio Rusiness 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Bar-Dol Products 

Corp 
Ben Mm Products Inc 



Lubricants 
Ben Hur coffee 



Curtis Publishing Co Saturday Evening 
Post 



Garrett & Co Inc 
Park & Tilford 



Virginia Dare 

wine 
Tintex 



Walsh (Montreal) 

Mogge-Privett (L.A.) 

BBDO (N.Y.) 

It ni In mil & Ryan 

(N.Y.) 
Storm & Klein (N.Y.) 



26 Eastern Canadia 

stns 
30 ABC Pac stns 

5 mkts 

Scattered mkts 

60 stns; 30 mkts 



Anncmts; 15 Mar 

News; M, W, F 10:30-40 

pm; 22 Jan; 52 wks 
Anncmts; 31 Jan; 13 wks 

Anncmts; 12 Feb; 8 wks 

Panic; 20 Feb; 10-12 wks 



i. 



4. National Rroadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John C. Ballard 
Claude Barrere 



Charles C. Bevis Jr 
Otto Brandt 
James II Connolly 
Harrison M. Dunham 
Wilbur S. Edwards 
(M. M. Fleischl 
Paul R. Fry 

1 Frederick E. Johnson 
, E. Harold Keown 
! Tony Moe 

Eugene R. Myers 
J Leonard Reeg 



Niimii Stations, Amarillo, natl sis mgr 
Independent sis rep for radio, tv package 

prog, N.Y. 
NBC, N.Y., asst to vp o&o stns 
ABC, N.Y., dir tv stns 
ABC, N.Y., dir radio stns 
KTTV, L.A., gen mgr 
WEEI, Boston, asst mgr 
WMCA, N.Y., acct exec 
Inland Broadcasting Co (KBON, KBON-FM, 

Omaha, KOLN, Lincoln), vp 
J. Walter Thompson, N.Y., copywriter 
Frederic W Ziv Co, Okla., acct exec 
WCCO, Mnpls., sis prom mgr 

WTAM, Cleve., sis 

ABC, N.Y., natl dir radio prog 



KFDA, Amarillo, gen mrg 

Transcription Sales Inc, N.Y., eastern div mgr (add- 
ed affiliation) 
KOA, Denver, mgr 
Same, vp tv stn relations 
Same, vp radio stn relations 
Same, gen mgr, board of dir 
KNX, Hlywd., stn dir 
Same, local sis mgr 
Same, pres 

Donald Cooke Inc, N.Y., acct exec 

WHBS, WHBS-FM, Huntsvillc, Ala., mgr 

KNX, Hlywd., and CBS Pacific net, dir sis prom 

(eff 15 Feb) 
Same, sis mgr 
Same, vp radio 



pro:; 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot) ; 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 







Claude Barrere 
Harrison Dunham 
Robert B. Brown 
Paul R. Fry 
Tony Moe 



(4) 
(4) 
(5) 
(4) 
(4) 



New and renetc 12 February 1951 



I. National Broadcast Sales Executives (continued) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Samuel Salzman 
Zonabelle Samson 
Lindsey H. Spight 
Robert M. Stocking 
Harry L. Stone 
Alexander Stronach Jr 
Harvey St rut hers 
Kalph Taylor 

Mort Weinbach 
Lloyd E. Yoder 



Allied Record Mfg Co, Hlywd., plant supt 

Leon Livingston, S.F., tiniebuyer 

Blair, S.F., vp, mgr 

B. T. Babbitt Co, N.Y., asst adv mgr 

WSM, WSM-TV, Nashville, vp 

ABC, N.Y., nail dir tv prog 

CBS Radio Sales-TV, N.Y., acct exec 

KN\. Hlywd., and CBS Pacific net, dir sis 

prom 
CBS, N.Y., talent, prog negotiator 
KOA, Denver, mgr 



Same, vp 






Forjoe & Co, S.F., 


mgr 




Blair-TV, S.F., vp, 


mgr 




Donald Cooke Inc, 


N.Y., 


acct exec 


KPHO, KPHO-TV, 


Phoe 


nix, gen 



Same, vp tv prop 

WEEI, Boston, asst pen mgr 

KTSL-TV, L.A., dir sis prom 

ABC, N.Y., prop dept bus mgl 
KNBC, S.F., mgr 



5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John A. Blum 
Robert B. Brown 
Herbert M. Cleaves 

Harold J. Cotton 
John F. Des Reis 

Benjamin F. Few 
Gerald Light 

C. E. O'Connor Jr 
Keith Porter 

Frederic N. Schwartz 

W. A. Swan 

L. D. Thompson 
Zach Toms 

Edwin WeisI Jr 
Peter M. Zaums 



Lever Brothers Co, N.Y., asst to pres 

Same, co dir 

Same, sis, adv mgr 

Same, merch dir 

Same, sis vp 



R. H. Mary & Co Inc, N.Y., exec 

Bristol-Myers Co, N.Y., vp 

General Foods Corp, N.Y., assoc sis mgr, 

Jell-O div 
Pabst Sales Co, Chi., sis prom mgr 
Ronson Art Metal Works Inc, Newark, gen 

sis mgr 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co, N.Y., sr vp, dir 
Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp, N.Y., 

avst to vp 
Diamond Match Co, N.Y., spec asst to pres 
Lever Brothers Inc (Harriet Hubbard Ayer Same, pres 

div), N.Y., sis mgr 
Bristol-Myers Co (Bristol Laboratories Inc), Bristol-Myers Co, N.Y., co dir 

S> racuse, pres 
Pabst Sales Co, Chi., asst gen sis mgr Same, gen sis mgr 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co, N.Y., purchas- Same, co dir 

ing dept head 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co, N.Y., sec, co Same, vp 

dir 
Tele-King Corp, N.Y., adv mgr Air King Products Co, Bklyn., adv. sis pron 

Pabst Sales Co, Chi., sales superv Same, sr sis superv (Chi. metropolitan di\ ) 



Same, pres 

Same, sis prom mgr 

Same, vp 



6. \ew Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



American Safety Razor Corp. Bklyn. 
Hover International Laboratories Inc, Chi. 
D. P. Bushnell & Co, Pasadena 
Carey Salt Co. Hutchinson, Kans. 

< & \Y Frozen Foods, S.F. 

Carotene Products Co, Litchfield, III. 

Cinomie Inc. N.Y. 

Coffee Time Products of America Inc, Host or 

Corn Belt Hatcheries, Joliet, 111. 

Crystal Cream & Butter Co, Sacramento 

Dejur-Amsco Corp. L.I.C.. N.Y. 

Marie Designer Inc, L.A. 

Erskine Mfg Corp. Erskine, Mnn. 

F. W. Ev anger, Wheeling, 111. 

Five Star Mfg Co, East Grand Forks, Minn. 

Hollywood Rogue Sportswear Corp. Hlywd. 

International Golf Products, Chi. 

Lee foods Division, K. C, Mo. 

Libby, McNeill & Libby, Chi. 

I.o- Angeles Brewing Co, L.A. 

Mosler Safe Co. N.Y. 

Ohio Match Co. Wadsworth, Ohio 

Reed Products Co. St. L. 

Regina Furniture Co. Bklyn. 
Reisa Dairy. Sikeston, Mo. 

Stcuer Laboratories Inc, Pittsb. 
Terre Haute Brewing Co, Tcrrc Haute 

Texas Nurseries. W innsboro 

J. C. Van Holteii & Son Inc. Milwaukee 
Wcih.rby-Kayser Shoe Co, L.A. 



Silver Star razors and blades 
H-A hair arranger 
Binoculars 

Salt packager 

Frozen foods 

Milri.ii milk compounds 

Perfumes 

Carbonated beverage 

Hatcheries 

Dairy products 

Movie cameras 

Contour chair lounges 

Champion Kcrger rotary snow plow 

Kennel food 

Freeman head bolt engine heater 

Rogue sbirts 

Miracle adjustable golf clubs 

Foodstuffs 

Pineapple products 

Eastside beer 

Safes 

Matches 

Inergel tablets 

Household furniture 

Dairy products 

Ammo-vcHs amnion iated dentifrice 

Beer and ale 

Nursery stock 

Pickles 

Men's and women's shoe store chain 



McCann-Erickson, N.Y. 

George H. Hart man, Chi. 

J. Walter Thompson. L.A. 

R. J. Potts-Calkins & Holden Inc, 

K. C, Mo. 
Ley & Livingston, S.F. 
Henri, Hurst & McDonald. Chi. 
Lawrence Boles Hicks Inc, N.Y. 
Harry Paul & Assoc, Boston 

Guild. It., „ & Bonfigli, S.F. 

Hoefer, Dietcrich & Brown Inc, S.F. 

Grey. N.Y. 

Walter McCreery Inc. Beverly Hills 

Barney Lav in. Fargo 

Kaufman & Vssoc, Chi. 

Lav in. South Fargo, N. D. 

Walter McCreery Inc, Hlywd. 

Edgar Walter Fischer. Chi. 

R. J. Potts-Calkins & Holden Inc, 

K. C, Mo. 
Foote, Cone & Belding, Chi. (eff 1 

Apr) 
Warwick & Legler, N.Y. 
Stockton. West. Burkhart, Cine. 
Young & Rubicani, N.Y. 
Dorrance-Waddell Co, N.Y. 
William Wilbur, N.Y. 
Harold Kirseh Co, St. L. 
Sussman & Adler, Bittsb. 
Biow Co, N.Y. 

J. F. Gelders Co, Oklahoma City 
Jim Baker Assoc, Milwaukee 
Yambert, Prochnow, M, II. < I, and 

Macaulay Inc, L.A. 





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Numliers afliT names 
refer to eategory of 
listing in New and 
Renew 

Harvey Struthers (4) 
Lindsey H. Spight(4) 
Leonard Reeg (4) 
B. F. Few (5) 

Alex. Stronach (4) 




WTIC's 50,000 Watts represented nationally by Weed"& Co. • Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres.— Gen. Mgr., Walter Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr.— Sales Mgr. 
12 FEBRUARY 1951 13 



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Eoses are ?ed 

Violets are Mue 
Listening is up -- 

And how are you? 

More people love Mutual these days than ever before— with a love that is 
measurable even unto decimal points. Compared with one year ago (when 
TV was just beginning its most alluring gains in public favor) precisely 
,9.48% more radio families are now attuned to the average of all regu- 
larly sponsored programs on Mutual. No other network can make any such 
happy statement — because none but Mutual has scored a plus. Source: 
the latest Nielsen average audience data (first December reports, '49 -'50). 



Hound more hearts would you. entwine ? 
Say you'll he ©up Valentine ! 



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People are faithful in Quebec 
— especially in their listening 

habits. 

For instance, the latest listen- 
ership figures just released by 
the B.B.M. disclose the follow- 
ing revealing fact: 295,540 
French Canadian families listen 
to CKAC regularly at night, 
311,100 listen regularly by 
day!* These circulation -figures 
are greater than that of any daily 
newspaper or other independent 
radio station in the entire Prov- 
ince ! 

Yes, CKAC reaches the heart 
of French Canada — covering all 
counties in Quebec, blanketing 
close to 70% of the total num- 
ber of radio homes in the Prov- 
ince. It's no wonder that CKAC 
gets Tesults- — -at a very modest 
cost per listener. 

*On 6-7 times per week listenership basis. 

CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Yourvg Jr. • New York, Chicago 

William Wright - Toronto 



Madison 



TIMEBUYER CONFESSIONS 

I want to congratulate you on the 
excellent strides you've made with 
sponsor. You certainly have succeed- 
ed in finding a different way to pre- 
sent the problems of broadcasting. 

I read the article you had in your 
4 December issue, "Confessions of a 
New York timebuyer." This must have 
been an answer to an editor's dream, 
judging by the amount of controversy 
if started. However, I'm wondering if 
this was a service or a disservice to ra- 
dio advertising. The young man was 
certainly not typical of anything but a 
slipshod, lazy timebuyer. It's easy to 
understand why he spent less than two 
years in that end of the business. From 
my observation, this article has tended 
to undermine the confidence of some 
advertisers and sponsors in the services 
they get from an advertising agency. 
Was this your intention? 

Such a result is unfortunate because 
there are a lot of sincere people buy- 
ing radio time who have conscientious- 
ly tried to use every bit of data avail- 
able to do a sound, constructive buying 
job. It's a shame to have them black- 
listed and smeared because some smart 
aleck wants to boast about how he "got 
by," how he did an inexcusable job 
because he was too "uneducated'' 
and/or too lazy to do a fair, conscien- 
tious job. Should we discredit every- 
one because of one blackguard? Are 
all physicians and surgeons to be 
smeared because some guy boasts he's 
a quack? 

Harlow P. Roberts 
Executive Vice President 
Goodkind. Joice & Morgan. Inc. 
Chicago 



CRAUER ARTICLE 

Congratulations on a fine article 
about Ben Grauer in the 1 January 
issue, "My twenty years with spon- 
sors. 

I la\ c long felt that too many times 
commercial copy (whether agency or 
local ) becomes stereotyped to a point 
where it is impossible to do justice for 
the sponsor. In the case of local copy, 
you have an opportunity to make the 
siiaiM'stions without too large an outiay 



of cash for telephones or telegrams. 
On agency copy, it is an entirely dif- 
ferent thing. I agree with Ben, though, 
when he states that in the majority of 
the cases a lot of thought has been 
put into copy to "punch" certain 
phrases or words and the announcer 
shouldn't lose sight of this fact. I sin- 
cerely hope that many of the agency 
people read this article and will grasp 
what Mr. Grauer is trying to suggest. 
Keep up the good work. Yours is a 
magazine that gets read, reread, and 
constantly referred to by not only the 
undersigned, but also the sales staff 
of this station. 

Raymond G. Ulbrich 

Station Manager 

WDM] 

Marquette. Mich. 



JOHNSONS WAX REBUTTAL 

I note a squib in your 20 November 
issue (Applause, p. 84) crediting us 
with having guts and also for admit- 
ting we had made a mistake in think- 
ing we could do a full advertising job 
without radio. 

It's nice to be told that you have 
guts. We are willing to admit that, but 
we have never admitted to making any 
mistake in the choice of advertising 
media during the past year. Sales for 
the year just concluded have been the 
largest in our history. 

William N. Connolly 
Advertising Director 
S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. 
Racine. Wis. 



WLW PRESIDENT COMMENTS 

Your editorial on the NBC rate re- 
duction, I thought, was very fine. I 
enjoyed reading it and believe you 
could not be more right. 

R. E. Dunville 
President 
WLW 
Cincinnati 



GROCERIES ON THE AIR 

Swell story on "Grocery stores on 
the air!" Can use a couple of copies 
of the story as soon as you can ship 
them out. Thanks for a job well done. 

Burt Levine 

Commercial Manager 

WPWA 

Chester, Pa. 



16 



SPONSOR 




Joe L Smith, Jr., Incorporated 



Represented nationally by WEED 
12 FEBRUARY 1951 



& CO. 



j 

17 



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You'd like the statistics on 

this Beauty it's tru? 

hut here are some, 

more vital to you. 

To Sell Northwestern Ohio 

there's ONE BEST BUY. 

It's Radio Station WSPD 

and here is why. 

For 28 years WSPD has been 

growing bigger 

until now the State Area 

BMB shows 90'/, is 

our figure. 

So get Results in this market 
if your client is needy. 
Buy time that is proven . . . 
buy spots on WSP (ee)D. 



IHKIPIP toledo > ohid 

5000 WATTS. N.S.C. /& 








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Spur 



Daniel B. Scully 

Advertising manager 
Nedicks, Inc., N. Y. 



A nickel cup of coffee today is something to shout about. 

That's exactly what Dan Scully, advertising manager of Nedicks. 
is doing for the company's 90 snack-stand stores I serving more than 
1 .000.000 people each week I . 

Actually, with an ad budget approaching $750,000. Dan is direct- 
ing the advertising for two separate operations: the stores and the 
wholesale division. About four-fifths of the $250,000 devoted to store 
advertising goes to radio. 

"We use eight radio stations in the Eastern area, four in New 
York City," says the 27-year-old manager who has been steering the 
company's advertising for the last year. "All of our radio work is 
confined to the disk jockev participation type of show aired between 
6 and 9 a.m.'" 

Informality keynotes the company's commercials. Dan gives the 
announcers a factual hook about Nedicks. The rest is up to the 
announcer who ad libs all plugs. The disk jockey has plenty to talk 
about, too what with Nedicks' five-cent cup of coffee and 12-cent 
breakfast. "We find that announcers do twice as good a job for us 
when they make the pitch in their own style.*' Dan explained. 

On each of the six mornings a week when the company airs its 
commercials, it has a Nedicks" breakfast sent up to the audience and 
station personnel. Part of the firm's air promotional activity is a 
Miss Nedicks contest that includes radio interviews for women em- 
ployees; also, visits by disk jockeys to Nedicks stores in the area. 

Nedicks' wholesales division is relatively new, was begun about a 
year ago. Its $500,000 ad budget is divided between radio, televi- 
sion, points-of-sale material, and newspaper. Products are a six- 
ounce can of orange drink concentrate, and small and large bottles 
of the finished drink; they are sold through regular retail outlets. 

Dan is taking in his stride the company's average expansion of 
one store a month. He has been in advertising since his college days 
before the war when he worked for the Leo Burnett Agency in Chi- 
cago. During the war he served three years as a navy flier: after- 
wards, worked in the merchandising and advertising departments oi 
the Los Angeles Examiner. He free-lanced in advertising for six 
months before joining Nedicks as advertising manager. 



18 



SPONSOR 










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******-*, 





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sponsored successfully by 
two big advertisers... 

always one of the leaders. 

To see another good buy, 
turn the page. 



_____ ________ 





New developments on SPONSOR stories 



See: "Mail orders by the millions" 

Issue: 22 May 1950, p. 28 

Subject: Successful radio/TV mail offers 



In "Mail orders by the millions," 22 May 1950, SPONSOR describi d 
the successful RCW Enterprises set-up. Since then mail-order busi- 
ness has been hurt by fly-by-nighters. Net result has been a tight- 
ening of station regulations to protect the public. 

In addition to current inquiries being made by Postal official-, 
stations themselves have taken the matter into hand. WFIL-TV in 
Philadelphia requires that every product advertised for mail order be 
backed by a certificate of approval from a recognized testing labora- 
tory or by reputation of an established merchandising firm. 

WFIX, New York, now requires information from the mail-order 
advertiser that includes: bank reference; two trade references who 
have had dealings with the advertiser in the past six months: and 
trade names being used by the advertiser. The station also requires 
that the advertiser have a showroom or retail outlet in the vicinity, 
or deposit $100 or more to satisfy listener claims should they arise. 



See: "How B & W climbed to 23 billion 

cigareUes" 

ISSUe: Two parts beginning 6 November 

1950, p. 21 

Subject: ^' r strategy of Brown & Williamson 



No change is expected in ,B & W's use of the air. 

Radio strategy described by SPONSOR in its two-part story. '"How 
B & W climbed to 23 billion cigarettes," 6 November 1950 and 20 
November 1950. is given by the company as chief reason for its 
Kools' 22.6% gain during 1950. This in face of a general slipping 
in leadership by the Big Three: Camel. Lucky Strike, and Chester- 
field. 

B & W's Raleighs, advertised solely by radio, steadied off with a 
7.1%, having gained 133% during the previous year. 



»ee: "Mohawk uses a new broom" 

ISSUe: 11 September 1950 

Subject: Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc. on TV 



Starting 12 March. Mohawk Carpet Mills. Inc. will supplement its 
broadcast of the Roberta Quinlan Show (NBC-TV) with radio. 

Through radio representative George Boiling. Mohawk has lined 
up some 27 radio stations for its special versions of the network tele- 
vision program. MCA already has a backlog of several months tran- 
scriptions stored away for use on the stations: they'll soon have 
enough for the three-times-a-week. 13-week schedule mapped out. 

Mohawk's plan is to put radio versions of the Roberta Quinlan 
Show into many markets still unserviced by TV. They will also drop 
their TV show on stations where time slots for kines are not to their 
liking, substitute radio transcriptions. Radio stations involved are 
merchandising the show heavily to Mohawk distributors, hope to 
prove radios power in comparison to television. 




COVERAGE 

Sure... We've Got It 

BUT... 

Like the Gamecock's 
Spurs... It's the 

PENETRATION 
WSPA*™ 



In This 
Prosperous 






$tf 



Jt\0* 




fcflN. 



BMB Report No. 2 Shows 
WSPA With The Largest 
Audience Of Any Station 
In The Area! 

AND... This Hooper 
Report Shows How WSPA 
Dominates This Area! 



HOOPER RATING- Winter 1949 

8:00 AM •- 12:00 N 63.2 

12:00 N -• 6:00 PM 53.6 

(Monday thru Friday) 
6:00 PM - 10:00 PM . . . 67.6 

(Sunday thru Saturday) 



GIVE YOUR SALES 
A POTENT PERMANENT HYPO 




Represented By: 

John Blair & Co. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 
Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



The No. 1 CBS Station For 
The Spartanburg-Greenville 
Market ? 



5,000 Watts -- 
950 On Your Dial 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



21 








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SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA 



HOLLYWOOD 




1937: PUTTING BEAT OF HUMAN HEART ON AIR TYPICAL OF WORKSHOP'S EXPERIMENTS; SHOW WAS POE'S "TELLTALE HEART" 

The Minions Columbia Workshop 



PART ONE 



OF A TWO-PART STORY 



From 1936 to 1947 the Workshop threw traditions 
overboard and sparked program progress 



over-all 



If the new or limited-expe- 
rience advertiser approach- 
ing either radio or television has one 
obviously dangerous attitude, it lies in 
his disposition to concentrate all his 
energies, enthusiasm and interest upon 
"the deal" (choice of network, time, 
costs, circulation data, dealer ties, etc.) 
and to overlook, or minimize, or take 
for granted, or leave to others, the far 
more important decision of "the 
show.*' And yet again and again it 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



proves out that, in the old Shakespear- 
ian dictum, "the play's the thing."' Ad- 
vertising impact is entertainment im- 
pact. For this reason the astute spon- 
sor sooner or later waxes studious 
about program history, program prob- 
lems, program know-how. Curiously 
enough no detailed analysis has. until 
now, been provided sponsors as to the 
one series of programs which more 
than any other series distilled a great 
amount of information and experience 



on script and studio ways and means. 
We refer, of course, to the famous 
Columbia Workshop. 

The Workshop series taught radio a 
great deal. In many direct and in- 
direct ways it stimulated advertisers, 
agencies, writers, directors, critics. It 
fed a vitalizing stream of new ideas, 
brains, blood, and personalities into 
the medium. It jarred the lazv and 
opened the eyes of business men. As 
J. Stirling Getchell influenced the art 



23 




THE COLUMBIA WORKSHOP ATTRACTED BIG NAMES. YOUNG MR. ORSON WELLES WAS FIRST HEARD IN SHAKESPEARE'S "HAMLET" 




Irving Reis was a founding father of the Columbia 
Workshop. An engineer who turned writer, Reis was 
a student of program content. He gave the Work- 
shop a year and a half of his pioneering spirit. It 
was Reis who brought to the air sueh stories as Archi- 
bald MaeLeish's "Fall of the City," sueh stars as Sir 
Cedrie llardwicke. and sueh authors as T. S. Eliot. 



of "ad-making," so did the Columbia 
Workshop add drive, bounce and chal- 
lenge to the art of "program-making." 
Take the radio classic, My Client 
Curley. It was experimental novelty 
when the Workshop initiated it, high- 
powered commercial humor when re- 
peated several times under sponsor- 
ship. The Ghost oj Benjamin Siveet 
was years ahead of the parade when 
produced on the Workshop in 1938 
and has since been followed by many 
another farce exploiting the fun in 
"disembodied" characters. The im- 
portant, if seldom mentioned, dra- 
matic cue music of radio, which con- 
tributes a great deal to story-telling 
technique, owes a monumental debt of 
encouragement to the Workshop. So, 
too, with sound effects. These were 
'"discovered" and "produced," both as 
to realistic and fanciful application. 
The Workshop influence may be found 
in direct spiritual descent in many a 
phonograph album for children today. 
The range and variety of literary sub- 
ject matter was much broadened and 
the Workshop often broke rigid limits 
needlessly imposed on the medium by 
narrow minds. The Workshop intro- 
duced to radio such unexpected, but 
worthwhile, authors as Shakespeare, 
Euripedes. Lord Dunsany, Oscar 



24 



SPONSOR 





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WORKSHOP PRODUCTIONS PIONEERED IN THE USE OF SOUND EFFECTS. SOUND CREW SIMULATES A CONSTRUCTION JOB 



Wilde, Irwin Shaw, William Saroyan, 
Ernest Hemingway, Stephen Vincent 
Benet. John Galsworthy, Hillaire Bel- 
loc, T. S. Eliot, Arthur Koher. John 
M. Synge and Archibald MacLeish. 

That the Workshop can be profit- 
ably studied today for bread-and-but- 
ter lessons useful to television seems 
clear. At the very least it can irrigate, 
ventilate, and fertilize the imagina- 
tions of the worried TVers who well 
know they are not playing with an 
Erector set. 

Today we see that television pro- 
grams are "developed" through a vast 
catch-as-catch-can system consisting of 
no system at all. The TV talent mar- 
ket is certainly jumping and the prowl 
for ideas, stunts, forgotten theatrical 
fads is unending. Script editors in- 
terminably dig in obscure writings 
seeking possible TV payoffs. Large, 
small, and hole-in-wall makers of com- 
mercial movies complicate the compe- 
tition as everybody packages every- 
thing and everybody dashes off in all 
directions. 

The talent scout, by whatever name 
he goes, has come into his own today 
but he is himself a conspirator plot- 
ting higher overhead for the sponsor. 
At his best the scout is an alert broker 
[Please turn to page 60) 




Natives (from Harlem nightclubs?) filled studio when producer wanted jungle sounds 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



25 







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y 




GABRIEL HEATTER BROUGHT BELTONE SUCH STRONG RESPONSE THAT HIS MBS COVERAGE JUMPED FROM 125 TO 300 STATIONS 



How to sell a man who can't hear 



When Beltone sunk lion's share of big budget into radio, 
it started a revolution in hearing-aid advertising 




... i 

Tteo Officials €i tittle 
Kvltimo'S Iff f'rof/rcfiit 



Fay Posen, wife of Beltone president 
Sam Posen, and her dynamic brother, 
David Barnow, share responsibility for 
the hearing aid company's million and 
a half dollar ad effort. Energetic Fay 
Posen helped her husband launch the 
firm in 1940 and then ran the growing 
company by herself when Sam Posen 
went into the Army in 1942. In addi- 
tion to this active business career she 
has been able to raise two sons, Larry 
and Mike. Her brother, 37-ycar-old 
David Barnow, was a successful insur- 
ance official before he joined Beltone 
in 1943 as general sales manager. His 
friendly approach has been a key fac- 
tor in building strong ties with Bel- 
tone's loyal distributors. 



. 



26 



At first blush, a hearing-aid 
promotion campaign based 
on selling via the ear, 
sounds like the logic of Gracie Allen or 
My Friend Irma. Closer analysis dis- 
closes an astute flanking movement by 
Beltone Hearing Aid Company, Sono- 
tone Corporation and Acousticon — all 
three are now using network radio. 
Strategy behind the new advertising 
moves: most inquiries for hearing aid 
instruments come in from friends or 
r< latives of the afflicted who can listen 
to the radio easily. This is because the 
hard of hearing are often far too shy 

SPONSOR 




deaf 

JUItt5wlJI • • • 



itener gets booklet above. 

Heatter ftirttisftec! so many 
that Beltone needs salesmen (see right) 



& i " m Z2&r. 




5£^= 




BELTONE URGENTLY NEEDS MORE SALESMEN IMMEDIATELY! 



ENORMOUSLY INCREASED QUANTITIES OF FRESH, NtW LEADS 

. . . leads from the Gabriel Heatter-Beltone network program . . . 
leads from national magazines . . . leads from regional radio . . . leads 
from newspapers . . . leads from television . . . leads from direct mail 
. . . these fresh, new inquiries pouring in daily, add up to tens of 
thousands of quality leads every month . . . yes, more than Beltone's 
present sales organization can possibly handle. 

IF YOU ARE A SALESMAN WHO COULD MAKE MORE SALES 
IF YOU HAD MORE LEADS . . . 

. . if you want to make more money — BKi money . . . and if you 
have good personal and business references, own your own car and 
are Imndable . . . then write, wire, or phone today and we'll let you 
know whether there is an opening in your home town or in other 
cities in which you may be interested. Get your applies) ion in 
quickly as the best openings will be the first to go. 

Addr«ut- 
RECRUITING DIRECTOR 

BELTONE HEARING ADD COMPANY 

BELTONE BUILDING 

1450 W. 19th St., Chicago 8, III. 

PHONE: TAylor 9-4182 



about their difficulties to make the first 
move. Many of them, however, do 
listen to the radio and make inquiries 
directly. 

It was careful research on this point 
which helped the Olian Advertising 
Agency, Chicago, show its client, Bel- 
tone, that network radio was a worth- 
while venture, with the result that Bel- 
tone began sponsoring Gabriel Heat- 
ter last fall and a new advertising 
trend was born in the hearing-aid in- 
dustry. 

Until recently, hearing-aid manufac- 
turers had no interest in large-scale ra- 
dio campaigns. This year, because of 
Beltone, the flow is in the opposite di- 
rection. The box score so far is this: 

1. Beltone, reported to have the 
largest sales, took its big step 20 Sep- 
tember 1950, buying the Gabriel Heat- 
ter show once a week on Wednesdays 
over MBS, 7:30-7:45 p.m. 

(The potency of the medium was 
seen immediately when enough leads 
came in to keep its 1.000 full-time 
salesmen busy.) 

2. On 6 January, Sonotone started 
Galen Drake on a new Saturday after- 
noon series over CBS. 2:30-2:45 p.m. 



3. Acousticon bought a month-long 
saturation campaign over MBS, using 

14 separate programs extending from 

15 January to 12 February. 

The Zenith Radio Corporation hear- 
ing-aid division, the other firm among 
the top four in the industry, is still out 
of network radio following the spot 
radio policy of the parent company. 
This hearing-aid manufacturer con- 
fines its efforts to market-by-market use 
of the medium. 

The extent of the shift into radio bv 



these companies may be gauged by the 
fact that Beltone has raised the radio 
share of its ad budget from five per 
cent to 45%; and that Acousticon is 
bringing radio from a similarly small 
figure perhaps to 75% of its ad bud- 
get; purchase of the Galen Drake show 
is taking about 18% of the Sonotone 
budget. 

Broadcast advertising is being em- 
ployed by the hearing-aid firms to meet 
a promotion problem not found in 
{Please turn to page 66) 



o 30 

2 



40 




YEARS 




HEARING DECLINES WITH AGE 

An important factor in program choice '. 



r 



— Frequency band — 
mportant for speech 



1% 



FREQ.32 64 128 256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192 

Hearing-aid firms choose programs like Gabriel Heatter which appeal to oldsters 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



27 



j.aEW aMWM HW' W * 




fl* 






There's more than an eye-arresting pair 
of legs propping up the Old Gold TV com- 
mercials each Tuesday night I NBC-TV) 
and Thursday night I ABC-T\ I . 

In the interest of journalistic zeal (and 
the 97.4% of advertising executives who 
ponder such matters as are represented on 
these pages) sponsor reports more fully. 

We've asked Miss X* to tell us about 
herself; she does it charmingly in the 
captions. (Her face is never shown in 
pictures Old Gold releases to TV fans in 
order to heighten the interest of the 
public.) 

*So sorry, seems we've misplaced her name— ami telephone 
number. 



2. What a relief — just sitting! I can't understand wJlk. 
Iho do. k l.eeps showing me every shoe in the shook .. 







'THIS JOB GIVES ME THAT BOXED-IN FEELING, BUT I HAVE LOTS OF FUN BEING AN ANIMATED BILLBOARD WITH SEX APFEAL" 



Pictures by Conrad Bigei 




3! The men whistle at him on the way home. J. "A dancer has to tread carefully, especially coming 
ell he loves to be the center of attraction" out of the shower. There's a big evening ahead" 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



5. "Some of my friends say I have a lovely profile, 
but I can't see it. Truthfully, what do you think?" 



29 



How's the 
lig Show" 




Ratings are still low, appeal 

is to big eities. But, said 
one sponsor, "We love it." 



fflBfjf' 



! Three months ago, NBC launched an experi- 



ment in bigness. The network was trailblazing 
in two directions at once: (1) By launching 
the longest, most talent-loaded comedy show in recent radio 
history; (2) By starting, at the same time, Operation Tan- 
dem with its new rotating participation basis for network 
sponsorship. 

In the period since then, ad men have watched closely 
for the tell-tale signs of program acceptance or failure. And 
the lunch table debate has flowed hot and heavy on occasion 
about the dangers of splitting sponsorship. To help answer 
some of the programing and commercial questions raised 
by the Big Show, sponsor spoke to advertisers who had 
bought into it; to some of those who considered buying but 
didn't; and to network and independent programing exec- 
utives. Here, then, is a quick report on how the Big Show 
is doing: 

1. The size of the audience as indicated by ratings is 
low for a broadcast of this magnitude. Nielsen gave it a 
4.7 on 5 November and then showed a steady increase to 
8.5 for 17 December, 1950, the most recent figure. Tren- 
dex, which is weighted in the direction of big-city pref- 
erences by virtue of its measurements in 20 large cities 
only, gave the Big Show a higher rating for 5 November 



30 




ISif) Show features expensive talent. A rece.it broadcast presented (left 



to 3 December, namely a 9.3 average for the first half 
hour: 9.8 for the second 30 minutes. 

2. The sophisticated level of the entertainment has ap- 
parently pulled better in large cities than smaller areas. It 
is much easier for a show with a rural appeal to attract city 
listeners than it is for this kind of entertainment to find 
small town and rural audiences. 

3. RCA, Whitehall Pharmacal. and Liggett & Myers have 
been participating in Tandem on an almost continuous 
basis, while Ford and Buick have had brief schedules on 
the three remaining availabilities. Including RCA, NBC's 
parent company, this means that Tandem has been 50% 
sold out during a good part of its run. NBC feels this is a 
fair record considering advertiser apathy towards night- 
time network radio. 

4. Cost-per-thousand listeners is $1.44 as compared with 
$2.58 for the average evening program, according to NBC. 

5. There is optimism at NBC that word of mouth and 
extensive magazine publicity will keep the Big Show rating 
moving upward until a healthy audience is achieved. Thir- 
teen weeks is often too brief a period for fair appraisal, 
say network officials. (And the experience of other now- 
successful shows bears them out.) 

From an advertising standpoint, the position of the Big 

SPONSOR 







i [ Dean Martin, Bob Hope, Meredith Willson, Satchmo Armstrong, Frankie Laine, Tallulah Bankhead, Deborah Kerr. Tallulah, Willson are regulars 






Show as the front wheel in Operation Tandem highlights 
a new concept in radio sales. To make nighttime radio 
more attractive to advertisers, participating sponsorship 
in the Tandem is available on five different nights each 
week at a weekly cost of about $30,000. In addition to 
the Big Show, the programs include the Boston Pops Or- 
chestra (the NBC Symphony was used earlier), Screen 
Directors Playhouse. Duffy's Tavern, and the Man Called 
X, a mystery show. 

Few programs have ever had a more publicized debut. 
And few public reactions have so jolted radio observers. 
"They don't come any bigger than this one and it rates 
Nielsen's best," one radio trade publication said in its 
review of the opening. But Nielsen could not give it his 
best. A 4.7 was the poor first rating. On a comparative 
basis, Nielsen shows that NBC is still unsuccessful in its 
latest move to dislodge Jack Benny, key target of the huge 
effort. He has been holding his own at a handsome 20 
rating, giving him second place among top network radio 
shows. Trendex (a phone coincidental survey in 20 major 
cities which, unlike Nielsen, is not projectible to the en- 
tire country) shows a slight falling off for Benny between 
5 November and 3 December and a better rating for the 
Big Show. CBS' Our Miss Brooks, 6:30-7 p.m.. corralled 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



Nielsen ratings of 12.6, 12.8, and 11.8 for 5 and 19 No- 
vember and 3 December as compared with 4.7, 6.8, and 7.2 
for the Big Show during the same period. Again, Trendex 
showed a marked difference by giving Our Miss Brooks 
12, 6.5, and 9.4. The Big Show had an average rating of 
9.5. 

The source of the Big Show audience is not clear but 
indications are that it is coming from television viewers 
who are turning off their sets to hear radio. Nielsen TV 
rating for this period is steady, while the Trendex shows 
a decline in viewing at the 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. period from 
19 November to 3 December. This runs counter to a 
seasonal trend when TV viewing should be rising. An- 
other likely source of the audience are those who are turn- 
ing on radios because of the show. A third and undeter- 
mined factor is that listeners on independent radio stations 
may be switching to the Big Show. 

An important statistic awaited along Radio Row is the 
Big Show Nielsen breakdown between city and small town- 
rural listening. As SPONSOR went to press, these figures 
were still in the works at Nielsen's Chicago headquarters. 
The data would throw more light on the question of how 
effectively Tallu goes over in the hinterlands. 
(Please turn to page 73) 



31 




iivttiaMfj ii§€* most out ©/ your 

Camera and props ? 



Illusions created by ingenious use of 

speeial effects cut cost, add drama 



T 



vision 



Four tricks of the trtttle 

1. "Plainclothesman" (DTN) has camera act, smoke 

2. Thread moves model car in Tydol's live commercials 
11. Actor falls harmlessly to mattress few feet below 
4. "Space Cadet" (ABC-TV) uses futuristic costumes 



A television camera, ingeni- 
7 ously employed, can produce 
more tricks than a magi- 
cian's silk topper, and tele- 
props, shrewdly manipulated, 
can outdo the cunning of a bogus 
seance medium. Yet. paradoxically. 
with all this wealth of magic at their 
command, many TV programs fail to 
exploit these special effects to fullest 
advantage. 

That's unfortunate, because clever 
use of the TV camera and props can 
mean extra dollars and cents to the 
alert advertiser — especially to those 
who get the screaming-meemies when- 
ever they think of the current rise in 
video's time and talent costs. Actually. 
(lie deft employment of TV special ef- 
fects benefits the sponsor in at least 
four ways: 

1. By whittling down sharply costs 
for unnecessary scenery. 

2. By serving as an inexpensive sub- 
stitute for costlv film inserts. 

3. By infusing extra showmanship 
into a TV program. 

4. And. perhaps most important, 
-i ecial effects can convert the selling 
punch in a TV commercial from a 
weak jab into a genuine haymaker. 

1 he fact that programs have failed 
heretofore to exploit fully potential 
camera and prop devices, is the fault 
mainly of the speed with which tele- 
vision has moved. Some of the gim- 
micks are mi new that only the techni- 
cians in a few TV stations are yet 
aware of them. Other tricks are jeal- 
onslv guarded by the Rube Goldbergs 
who invented them. Still other de- 
\ ices, simple yet economical, have es- 
caped the general attention of the spon- 
sor merely because they sound so com- 
plex when explained in the gobbled}'- 



gook lingo of the TV cameraman, pro- 
ducer, or technical engineer. 

After conducting a survey among 
top experts in the field, sponsor is 
proud to present what is probably the 
first extensive report on current TV 
special effects. It may help the ha- 
rassed adman determine what he can 
or cannot do to enhance his video pro- 
duction. For convenience, special ef- 
fects described have been grouped un- 
der descriptive headings. 

I. Superimposition 

One important camera trick that 
many sponsors neglect to exploit suf- 
ficiently is "superimposition." To 
quote from sponsor's own TV Dic- 
tionary for Sponsors, this simply 
means: "The overlapping of an image 
produced by one camera with the 
image from another camera. Both pic- 
tures being visible, but appearing final- 
ly as one picture." 

Superimposing can be an asset to a 
sponsor in a variety of ways. It can 
heighten the drama of a commercial. 
as in Admirals Lights Out show 
( NBC-TV ) . Here, when the demon- 
strator opens the door of an Admiral 
refrigerator to reveal its dual tempera- 
ture, the image of a little boy dressed 
as an elf is superimposed right inside 
the machine. This live elf hops about, 
explaining that Admiral's dual tem- 
perature will keep the housewife's let- 
tuce crisp and moist. I The ell's named 
"d.t.") 

In the words of Peter Finney, as- 
sistant account executive at Erwin, 
Wasey & Company. "That way, we get 
the action of a film, yet the sense of 
reality of a live demonstrator, blended 
into a cute symbol." 

Superimposing can be used in the 



32 



SPONSOR 







S ii pi' r i m pos i i i «» 1 1 : 



lusion of underwater interview was created by the use of two cameras, one on CBS' Dorothy Doan, other on fish tank. See inset 



interests of flexibility and saving time, 
as in the final commercial of Old 
Gold's Stop the Music (ABC-TV). In 
the show's opening commercials, the 
audience sees Old Gold's dancing cig- 
arette package and match box. ( The 
identity of the dancers inside is never 
revealed, despite thousands of requests. 
"It hypoes the viewers curiosity," says 
Larry Holcomb, formerly in charge of 
radio/TV productions for Lennen & 
Mitchell, now in charge of the New 
York radio/TV office of Tatham-Laird, 
Inc., Chicago.) However, though the 
final commercial is so brief that it 
only permits announcer Dennis James 
time to make a short sales pitch, the 
1". Lorillard Company felt that the 
dancing cigarette package should at 
least put in an appearance. 

Consequently, the Lennen & Mitch- 
ell staff decided to superimpose the 
dancing package in a corner of the 
screen, like the little Esky trademark 
or. the cover of Esquire Magazine. 
This was done by flashing James' 
image on the screen with one camera. 
He looks up. Then camera two im- 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



poses the image of the dancing pack 
in an upper corner of the screen. The 
pack does a couple of steps, while 
James winds up his 20-second sales 
message: "Old Gold cigarettes . . . 
for a treat instead of a treatment. So 
long . . . and I'll be seeing you!" 

Superimposing can also add consid- 
erable showmanship to a program. On 
the Vanity Fair show (CBS-TV) spon- 
sored by the Coro Jewelry Company, 
for example, m.c. Dorothy Doan was 
scheduled to interview an expert on 
tropical fish. It was inevitable that she 
dreamed up the idea of slipping into a 
mermaid's tail and interviewing him 
"underwater." While Miss Doan and 
her guest casually gabbed in the open 
air in front of one camera, a second 
camera superimposed the image of a 
tank full of tropical fish over the first 
image, creating the underwater illu- 
sion. 

Finally, superimposing serves to re- 
inforce and reemphasize a sales mes- 
sage tremendously. This is best illus- 
trated in the commercials of the Gar- 
{Please turn to page 52) 




Pro jt*<"< ion: slide makes inexpensive background 



33 



over-all- 



What makes a competitor 
a good customer? 

Broadcasters know the answer. 

Two giants in the periodical field. 
Life and Saturday Evening Post, are 
making significant use of the air this 
season. Life, which topped all printed 
media in 1950 advertising revenue with 
$80,365,507 and took full-page news- 
paper space to tell the advertising 
trade about it, is spending about 
$30,000 weekly in television. 

Saturday Evening Post (second only 
to Life in black-and-white revenue) al- 
locates the largest part of its advertis- 
ing budget to promotion, on the air. 
Like any manufacturer seeking mass 
acceptance for his product, these pub- 
lications are using radio and TV to 
boost circulation and build greater 
prestige. These gains, in turn, give the 
periodicals a more convincing argu- 
ment in lining up national advertisers 
to fill their pages. 

sponsor's appraisal of the coopera- 
tion between the rival media discloses 
this pattern: 

1. Stepped up television activity. 
Life is sponsoring Kukla, Fran and 
Ollie in 50 markets on Thursday 
nights, plus a 27-market announcement 
schedule; the Post is expanding the 
Tex and Jinx New York Closeup from 
one to five markets. 

2. Radio announcement schedules. 
Curtis is increasing its market coverage 
for the Post announcements, while 
other magazines are using radio an- 
nouncements to stimulate newsstand 
sales in specific areas. 

3. Sponsorship of special events 
(such as football broadcasts) by Look. 

4. College station use: Neivsiveek is 
buying time on 10 such outlets to boost 
circulation among university students. 

5. Programing tie-ins with networks 
and other sponsors: Macfadden, for 
example, arranges sponsorship of its 
My True Story on Mutual by William- 
son Candy Company. 

Curtis Circulation Company, through 
Batten, Barton Durstine & Osborn, 
uses radio and TV to move the Satur- 
day Evening Post off newsstands in a 
hurry. Weeklies like the Post or Life 
cannot remain on dealers' racks long. 
Like other national advertisers, Cur- 
tis takes the long view. ("It has plenty 
of cash to do it."' one competitor re- 
marked enviously.) 

Direct sales are never the sole tests 
of a specific Post effort. The way Cur- 
tis uses radio for outright institu- 
tional purposes was illustrated by its 




Sutlli'tlflfi I r<Misn«; Post uses Tex and Jinx TV show to amplify visual impact of covers, b. 



Manes on the ai 



sponsorship of a daytime show for 
several years. The Philadelphia pub- 
lishing house wanted more housewives 
to become acquainted with the maga- 
zine so it sponsored a 15-minute pro- 
gram, The Listening Post, over ABC 
from 1944 to 1948. The show, which 



dramatized articles from the magazine, 
began as a twice a week venture, in- 
creased to three times a week. Its aban- 
donment in 1948, Post officials explain, 
meant, merely, that this particular edu- 
cational job had been accomplished 
and that it was time to go after the 



£>ifp bought "Kukla, Fran and Ollie" Thursday nights to "tease" public with pictorial features 





>tic bits in Post announcements, new every week, make radio a powerful circulation booster 



is major raclio/TV advertiser among slicks 
with weekly teaser announcements and TV show 



next target, mass audiences. 

The most recent move of the Post 
on radio has been to step up its an- 
nouncement schedule from eight mar- 
kets to 11. Some 30 announcements 
are carried Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays in New York. Chicago, 



San Francisco, Philadelphia, Kansas 
City, Detroit, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Indian- 
apolis. Buffalo, Denver and Portland. 
The 52 campaigns a year are han- 
dled at a hectic tempo by Ollie Presby, 
BBDO account executive and his assis- 
tant, Kevin Kennedy. Announcements 



Look sponsored football broadcasts such as L.S.U.-Texas game to promote sport features 




for each issue are started five weeks 
ahead when the agency and the Curtis 
promotion officials discuss the articles 
that will make the best promotional 
material. Once the editorial matter is 
selected, the agency's copy group pre- 
pares the commercials; these are 
< becked by the client at the next week- 
ly meeting. Then, three weeks before 
the magazine issue date, the one-min- 
ute transcriptions are cut. The tech- 
nique is to combine small bits of dra- 
matic action with a hard-hitting com- 
mercial. The drama is designed to 
have a strong curiosity-arousing, teaser 
effect. 

There is no doubt that this skillful 
use of the medium has paid off. Com- 
ments Curtis' circulation manager Don 
Van Metre, "Radio has been a very 
effective medium for Curtis." And Post 
circulation is now at an all time high 
of 4,036,246. 

This February, the Post is also 
stretching out on television. The Tex 
and Jinx New York Closeup is now 
carried over WBNS, Columbus; WXEL, 
Cleveland; KTLA, Los Angeles; and 
WAAM, Baltimore, in addition to 
WNBT, New York, where the maga- 
zine originally bought the show last 
October. This 25-minute program on 
film is presented at 6:30 p.m. Wednes- 
days in New York, but in later and 
more favorable times in other cities. 
Airing the WNBT program over other 
NBC-TV facilities at the original New 
York time was out because of the diffi- 
culty in finding availabilities. Conse- 
quently, the decision was made to put 
the show on film and buy the best 
available time for it. Closeup fol- 
lows Don McNeill in Baltimore, Pabst's 
boxing in Cleveland, and Fireside 
Theatre in Los Angeles. 

Van Metre, keeping his fingers 
crossed, is calling this expansion a 
"test move." But the program and the 
medium are uniquely fitted to maga- 
zine promotion. First, the format of 
the program is a presentation of news 
and current developments from an en- 
tertaining feature angle; thus it should 
attract the same audience that would 
be interested in the Post's articles. 

Visual impact, the standard phrase 
of the TV time salesman, should have 
particular application here. The Post 
spends thousands to achieve visual im- 
pact at the newsstands with its «over 
illustrations. And Tex McCrary de- 
livers at least one commercial by hold- 
ing the cover of the magazine up to 
(Please turn to page 69) 









<* ■> 



A 



'SR 



If 



J4i> 



■*± 



WISELY, PRUDENTIAL MERCHANDISES BERCH TO KEY MEN IN SALES FORCE: DISTRICT MANAGERS IN CHARGE OF AGENTS 



Does vour star click 

1/ 



with pr salesmen 



s 



Jack Bereh, Prudential m.e., sold himself— and radio— to eompany's 

field foree. His story may suggest an apnroaeli for other firms 



rh( 



re are two important 
ways you can merchandise 
a radio show. First, to your potential 
audience. Second, to your own sales 
lone. But this second, and equally im- 
portant, kind of merchandising is fre- 
quentl) forgotten or followed through 
in lip-sei \ ice fashion only. 

A rare exception is the Prudential 
Life Insurance Compan) o! America's 
Jach Berch Show (NBC, II :30-ll:45 
a.m. EST). Low-cosl to begin with 
(talent budget weekl) is $3,500), this 
program makes each dollar yield extra 
values beeau-i' il has clicked with the 
company's sales force. 



3G 



It wasn't an elaborate merchandis- 
ing scheme complete with four-color 
posters, dancing-girls, and organized 
indoctrination which accomplished this 
for Prudential. For all these things, 
substitute the faith of Prudential top 
brass in their radio stars ability to sell 
himself on a face-to-face basis — and the 
star's sincerit) (a much over-used word 
hul justified here). 

These are ill" three basic things 
Berch's face-to-face merchandising did 
lor the companj thai pays him pri- 
marilj to sing and sell over the air; 
thej are things any sponsoring corn- 
pan) can accomplish — given the right 



approach and the right star. 

1. Berch sold radio as a medium to 
hundreds of agents personally, to thou- 
sands of others indirectly through per- 
sonal contact with district office man- 
agers; thus he functioned in an im- 
portant morale-building capacity by 
making the salesmen feel the company 
was giving tin in the best in advertis- 
ing support. 

2. He enlisted the cooperation of 
agents in promoting audience for the 
Prudential show. 

3. He helped show agents how to 
use radio as an aid in selling. 

Granted that none of these by-prod- 

SPONSOR 




,rch learned about selling insurance first hand by making rounds with men Close cooperation of agency, company, Berch helped sell star to salesmen 



uct accomplishments can ever rank 
with programing excellence, cos! per 
listener, or other over-all strategic con- 
siderations, consider the ways in 
which these three points are impor- 
tant to the company with a large sales 
force. Mainly, it's a matter of mass 
psychology. 

To put it in the words of Arthur 
Miller's "Death of a Salesman." an in- 
surance agent travels his debit ( route ) 
on "a smile and a shoeshine."' Like 
any other salesman, his smile dims or 
brightens with the confidence he has 
in himself and his companv. That's 
why merchandising radio advertising 
to him is of such importance. Give a 
salesman the feeling that his company's 
advertising is of real sales promotion 
value, and you start him out chipper. 
Let him get the idea that money spent 
on advertising is waste, on the other 
hand, and he'll soon be wondering why 
that money can't show up on his pay 
check in the form of increased com- 



missions. 

By creating enthusiasm for the pow- 
ei of radio, Berch has done the morale- 
boosting job. And out of salesmen's 
enthusiasm for radio comes willingness 
to use it fully (as mentioned in points 
2 and 3 above I . 

Just how did Berch go about his in- 
tramural merchandising? What are 
the lessons to be learned by other com- 
panies selling goods or services of any 
kind? For some of the answers, you 
have to meet Jack Berch. 

Berch is as much a salesman as a 
singer. His attitude is that of an em- 
ployee of the Prudential, not that of a 
performer on hire to an agency and 
indirectly drawing pay checks from the 
sponsor. He .considers the Prudential 
show a full-lime job and works at it 
that way. from 9 to 5 daily. His atti- 
tude, therefore, suggests several impor- 
tant criteria for selection of a perform- 
er where a company feels that reach- 
ing out to its own salesman is impor- 



tant. I 1 I Will the performer help 
make his program a lasting and vital 
part of the firm's advertising plans b) 
working at real intramural merchan- 
dising? (2| Is the performer's per- 
sonality a thing of tinsel and glitter. 
hi can he step from behind the micro- 
phone and make friends face to face? 
Jack Berch makes friends with Pru- 
dential agents easily because he puts 
over the idea that he knows a sales- 
man's problems, that he has been a 
salesman, and that he wants to help 
them do a job. The fact thai he has 
been a door-to-door salesman himself 
comes under the category of fortuitous 
circumstance; but that's not the divid- 
ing line between who can make or who 
cannot make a good intramural mer- 
chandiser. Any singer, master of cere- 
monies, or comedian can establish rap- 
port with a sales force no matter what 
his background, il he's willing, and if 
he's got the person-to-person touch. 
{Please turn to page 75) 




>ads Berch pulls in his fan mail are passed on to agents in all districts Agents, in turn, help Berch by distributing blotters promoting his show 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



37 



PIANO ACCORDIONS 




SALAMI 




SPONSOR: Rosenman's, Ltd. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A one-time announcement 
for $5.50 promoted the sale of two piano accordions. The 
store ran the commercial at 1:12 p.m. and within minutes 
after the announcement, two women phoned Rosenman's 
and said they'd be in to purchase the accordions. They 
came to the store soon after and made their purchase. 
That meant two piano accordions sold for $425 as the 
result of a single $5.50 air advertisement. 

CKX, Brandon, Manitoba PROGRAM: Announcement 


SPONSOR: S. F. Sausage Factory AGENCY: Gelsi-Medeo 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This sausage factory want 
ed to test audience reaction so they ran a little contest on '• 
the Italian-American Hour. No big prizes — just $120 in 1 
cash. Using three announcements a week, the company 
pulled over 15,000 replies. With each entry contestants 
were required to send in two salami labels. At a dollar 
per salami, the advertiser drew $30,000 worth of sales 
from program contestants alone. 

KROW, Oakland PROGRAM: Italian-American Hour j 




V 




STOVES 




| 


RADIO 
RESULTS 


SPONSOR: Cook Furniture Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The company used just one 
announcement at a cost of $10 to advertise the sale of 
stoves. The announcement was broadcast on Friday after- 
noon. By the following week, Cook's had sold all the 
stoves advertised for a gross of $750. The sponsor is 
gratified at the swift response to his air advertising and 
adds that he has personal statements from his customers 
that purchased as a result of his single announcement. 

WLAW, Lawrence PROGRAM: Announcement 






CHRISTMAS CARDS 




1 PHOTO SUPPLIES 






SPONSOR: Patton Photo Supply ACENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This advertiser entered ra- 
dio with a Sunday to Friday, late-evening 10-minute news- 
cast. During the month of December they spent $550 for 
their news sponsorship. The store reports a 20% increase 
over their December business of last year (1949). The 
actual dollar increase attributed to their radio sponsor- 
ship is estimated at $4,000. // the business upswing con- 
tinues, Patton s radio advertising will be expanded. 

WOOD, Grand Rapids PROGRAM: Newscast 


SPONSOR: Bible Book Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Two hundred and fifty 
"talking" Christmas cards failed to move off the shelves. 
The cards had a plastic ribbon which said Merry Christ- 
mas when a fingernail was run down the ribbon. One 
$4.50 announcement late Sunday night included a dem- 
onstration by the announcer. The result: all 250 cards 
retailing at 25c each were sold the following day and cus- 
tomers requested more. No other media were used. 

WABB, Mobile PROGRAM: Announcement 




PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 




GAS RANGES 




SPONSOR: McMahan's AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: McMalvans wanted addi- 
tional store traffic and decided on a one-program plug 
for specially priced phonograph records. The commer- 
cial copy on the McMahan's Dude Ranch Party read: 
"Go to McMahan's TODAY for this special, offer." One- 
time cost for the show is $22.40. The immediate nesult 
of the one-day offer: 949 records sold. And, after the 
one day special, a noticeable increase in floor traffic. 

KFXM, San Bernardino PROGRAM: McMahan's Dude 

Ranch Party 


SPONSOR: Eastern Electric Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This 18-year-old Norfolk 
firm was ordering gas ranges in lots of two and three — 
then they undertook sponsorship of a 15-minute woman's 
show, Conversation Time. Supplementary announcements 
were also scattered throughout the day's broadcasting 
schedule. The total first month expenditure for program 
and participations cost $250. Now firm's orders for 
ranges have increased by the carload. 

WGH, Newport News, Va. PROGRAM: Conversation Time; 

Participations 










I' 



greatest 



i-^— ■ 



, 



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. 



the players arc diplomats at Lake Success, 
G.I.'s in Korea, generals in the Kremlin 



and civilian defen 



be workers 



hers in New ) ork 



the authors are Senators on Capitol Hill, 
correspondents in Hong Kong and reporters 
fling copy with Pravda, the London Times, 
the Emporia (hand Gazette. 

the producers have addresses in II ashington, 
in Peiping, in Moscow, in Paris. 



the greatest drama of all time unfolds in 
minute-by-minute installments . . . and only radio reports 
each epoch-making development as it happens. The people of 
Imerica look first to radio newscasts to follow the most 

important events of all lime. ..the news of the I950's. 

If you are looking for the mosl valuable franchise in ach ertising, 
start planning now for a schedule of SPOT NEWSCASTS 
in your major marketing areas. \ good place 
to begin is on one or more of the nation s 



leading stations represented \>\ 



NBC Spot Sales 



NEW YORK CHICAGO CLEVELAND BAIN FRANCISCO HON t w <>ol> 



I \\ NBC \, u York 

\\ M \0 Chicago 

WTAM Cleveland 

w .^ v Schenectady— 

WU1 Ubanj I...N 

\\H<; Washington 

M>\ Denver 

■ -I KNBC San Fran. [SCO 




ALONE . . . HE'D BE SENSATIONAL! 






I 



AND REGKI 




ALONE . . . SHED BE TERRIFIC! 




" 1 



k\i 



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U » »' 




,j^^ 



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v»o R° sE 



0\RECT\O^ 







70™ 



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'/KBarf 





^3 





Mr. Sponsor asks*.* 



Are television broadcasters and sponsors fulfilling 
their public-service responsibilities? 



D. Malcolm Cox 



Vice president in charge of sales promotion 
Pepsi-Cola Company, New York 




Mr. Mickelson 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Cox 

If someone would 
come up with a 
realistic defini- 
tion of the word 
" responsibility, " 
the question 
could be an easy 
one to answer. 
But '"responsibil- 
ity" has become 
one of those 
cliches which is 
losing its meaning through overuse. It 
has become something like a mirror. 
What you see in it depends on who's 
looking at it. 

To answer the question bluntlj 
though, my reply is "yes." Television 
broadcasters and sponsors are realistic 
in considering their public-service re- 
sponsibilities. But those responsibili- 
ties extend far beyond providing class- 
room instruction, adult education, or 
even serious music or the proceedings 
of the UN. 

Television really won't be discharg- 
ing its responsibilities fully unless and 
until it builds the broadest possible 
circulation, acquires the maximum 
\ iewing consistent with the public in- 
terest, and places itself on a sound 
financial basis. At its current tender 
age, it is hardly mature enough to have 
accomplished all these objectives. But 
it is working on this broader concept 
o! public responsibility as well as the 
narrower one. 

The track record, unless you are 
looking for ueaknoscs with a high- 
powered microscope, is pretty good. 
An English playwright called Shakes- 



peare would be frightened out of his 
grave if he knew how many persons 
had seen his plays within the last 12 
months. So would Richard Brinsley 
Sheridan, Oscar Wilde, Charles Dick- 
ens, and a great number of others. Just 
two or three years ago, it would have 
been completely incredible to assume 
that several hundred thousand persons 
would be viewing the deliberations of 
the United Nations as they took place; 
or that several million persons would 
watch the President of the United 
States as he addressed the nation con- 
cerning a national emergency. 

This facet of television is pretty well 
known to the public, but it is only the 
beginning of what the industry can do 
when it conquers its technical and 
financial problems. Progress in the 
last 12 months alone has been, to put 
it quite mildly, fantastic. 

This is not meant to imply that the 
record is completely unblemished. Per- 
formance records of individual stations 
and networks are uneven. We who are 
in the business certainly can't claim in- 
fallibility. There must be ideas and 
techniques we haven't yet discovered. 
I am sure we sometimes discourage 
easily when we collide with the frus- 
trations involved in cable allocations, 
station acceptances, and high costs. 
And I suspect we haven't gone far 
enough in exploring the possibilities 
for sponsor-broadcaster cooperation in 
public affairs shows. 

That is one step we can take imme- 
diately to speed our progress. Broad- 
casters and sponsors working jointh 
can perform public services we could 
never approach independently. And 
this is an extraordinarily opportune 
time for sponsors to consider serioush 
the public-service area. 

So the answer to the question is 



"yes." Yes, we realize our responsi- 
bilities. Furthermore, I am sure we 
are making progress toward fully dis- 
charging them. 

Sic Mickelson 

Director of Public Affairs 

CBS 

New York 



The answer to 
your question is 
a categoric "yes." 
Not only are tele- 
casters realis- 
tic in consider- 
ing their respon- 



Mr. Witting 



9&^^A sibility, but man) 

r-^U ol them arc prov- 

'.^B ing extremely 

resourceful in 
adapting their 
new medium to developing opportuni- 
ties for public service in many fields. 
In fact, we at Du Mont carry on a 
continuing project in program research 
just as assiduously as our counterparts 
in our manufacturing divisions carry 
on their research in electronics. 

For a new medium scarcely three 
years old as a commercial operation, 
I think TV has a record that we in the 
industry can be proud of. What me- 
dium, for example, has done a more 
effective job of acquainting millions 
with the nature of the men who have 
made Communism a worldwide men- 
ace than TV networks which turned 
their cameras on UN sessions during 
the last few months, to let Americans 
hear and see these men in action? 
Every reader of these lines knows how 
Malik and Vishinsky stacked up in 
public esteem, and they have this 
knowledge directly as a result of see- 
ing and hearing these men. Soviet 



42 



SPONSOR 



lies about democracy, about capital- 
ism, about the Western way of life, are 
being utilized by the Russians to di- 
vide the world, and Du Mont, in co- 
operation with Freedom House, has 
broadcast a weekly program acquaint- 
ing Americans with the stories told 
about them. So, too, every network 
carries at least one program that 
serves as a forum for outstanding na- 
tional leaders who discuss problems 
of national and world importance. I 
think that it is highly significant that 
on many of these programs personali- 
ties of national stature make news 
worthy of Page One of the country's 
newspapers next day. Here at Du 
Mont we try to add an extra dimen- 
sion to news in such projects; for ex- 
ample, George Putnam's recent flight 
to Great Britain and Germany for man- 
on-the-street interviews with London- 
ers and Germans. 

All telecasters are acutely interested 
in educational TV and in finding the 
way to utilize this medium for an ef- 
fective service in this important field. 
Du Mont has always been quick to 
explore suggestions and ideas from any 
responsible educational or public au- 
thority, and the hearings before the 
FCC, as well as the recent monitoring 
of New York programs for the Na- 
tional Educational Broadcasters, give 
evidence of network and affiliate devo- 
tion to the use of our facilities in the 
public service. 

The important and realistic as- 
pect of the whole question is a recog- 
nition that public authorities and lead- 
ers in such important fields as educa- 
tion have only started to utilize TV 
for public service, and there is acute 
need for closer coordination between 
the telecasters and established public 
service organizations. To cite two ef- 
forts being made in education right 
now, I might mention the Johns Hop- 
kins Science Review, which Baltimore 
station WAAM and Du Mont are mak- 
ing available to our affiliates — and the 
project which WFIL-TV of Philadel- 
phia has just arranged with 19 col- 
leges and universities in that area, will 
undoubtedly be emulated in many 
other regions before this year is out. 

No one realizes better than telecast- 
ers themselves that all these efforts in 
these many fields do not represent the 
ultimate in TV's public service, but 
they do indicate that the industry is 
conscious of its responsibility and is 

(Please turn to page 78) 
12 FEBRUARY 1951 







95th MARKET IN 
THE UNITED STATES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, capital city 
of Alabama, is the hub of one of the na- 
tion's top markets; the South's most pro- 
gressive industrial and agricultural center. 

TRADING AREA POPULATION 
OF OVER 600,000 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, whose city 
population alone totals 107,000, dominates 
the rich surrounding trading area of 1 1 ex- 
panding counties. 

$133,890,000 
CITY RETAIL SALES 

• Mighty MONTGOMERY, had city 
retail sales in 1950 that were $5,000,000 
above those of the previous year; proof 
that this market is the "fastest growing 
area in the South." 



Write, Wire or Phone for Availabilities! 



NBC 

WSFA 

Represented by 
Headley-Reed Co. 



MUTUAL 

WJJJ 

Represented by 
Weed & Co. 



MONTGOMERY 
/NETWORK 
STATIONS 
ASSOCIATION 



CBS 

wcov 

Represented by 
The Taylor Co. 

ABC 

WAPX 

Represented by 
The Walker Co. 



43 



r 



■N 



Of course . . . 
I'm listening to 

UJRI1L 




In Richmond, Virginia 
the important 
BUYING AUDIENCE 
has the WRNL 
LISTENING HABIT! 

You'll get a BIGGER SHARE of the 
Outstanding Richmond Market in 
1951 . . . with WRNL. WRNL 
gives you complete coverage in this 
Industrially Progressive, Economi- 
cally Sound, Agriculturally Rich 
tradinq area. WRNL has been on 
910 KC at 5000 watts for more 
than 10 years ... so the impor- 
tant Buying Audience has the Lis- 
tening Habit! Ready Buying Power 
plus WRNL equals More Sales 
then Ever. 

Remember . . . 
THERE'S MORE 
SELL ... ON 




5000 WATTS 910 KC 

Day & Night 

NON-DIRECTIONAL 

(daytime) 
ABC AFFILIATE \ 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports ot 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed 



Radio pulls 10,000 customers for 15-year sponsor 

Wieboldt Stores. Inc., constitute a 
group of six department stores in Chi- 



cago and suburbs. They're firm be- 
lievers in broadcast advertising as this 
fact indicates: for 15 consecutive years 
they've sponsored the Your Neighbor 
program on NBC's WMAQ. making 
the show the oldest daily program un- 
der the same sponsorship in Chicago. 
(And, for 13 of the 15 years this 8 
a.m. half-hour daily time-temperature- 
record program has featured Miss June 
Marlowe, also something of a record. I 

Recently, the company planned an 
official opening for an expanded and 
modernized store in suburban Oak 
Park and decided to bank on radio/TV 
celebrities to attract customers. The 
format was to include a day-long se- 
ries of personal appearances of popu- 
lar shows, interviews, and live remote 
broadcasts at the store — all climaxed 
l>\ a gala celebrity show in the evening. 
The expenditure: a reported $4,000. 
This is what Wieboldt got for their 
money. 

Play or Pay program, m.c.'d by 
\\ BBM's Tommy Bartlett; Double 
Quiz, featuring Jim Lowe and singer 
Billy Leach, followed immediately af- 
ter Bartlett. Other personalities mak- 
ing appearances included singer Bill 
Lawrence; Fran Allison of kukla. Fran 
& OHie; the star of the Sky King pro- 
gram and Belli- Chapel, vocalist on the 



Dave Garroway show (NBC-TV). 

The one-dav promotion exceeded the 
hopes of Wieboldts radio-enthusiastic 
executives including sales manager 
William T. White. !t was estimated the 




CBS' Bill Lawrence upped sales in radio section 

crowd in the new store throughout the 
da) exceeded 40.000. This is more 
than half of the 1950 population of 
the Oak Park-River Forest suburban 
community, where the store's located. 
From the time the store opened at 
noon until closing after 9:30 p.m., 
these 40.000 people jammed the aisles, 
making purchases and being enter- 
tained. Three thousand people mobbed 
the radio/TV section of the store to 
hear singer Bill Lawrence: Tomim 
Bartlett halted traffic in another corner 
of the store with his quiz show: Jim 
Conway of Meet the Missus held the 
super market crowd at Wieboldt's and 
NBC-TV's Fran Allison was kept busy 
autographing record volumes. * * + 



EDWARD PETRY & CO.. INC.. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




Tommy Bartlett, WBBM star, entertains part of huge crowd that attended opening of new store 



14 



SPONSOR 



High school talent wins gootlwill and sales on W'C.IV 



By taping and broadcasting activi- 
ties at 50 high schools in Virginia and 
North Carolina, the Pyrofax Gas Divi- 
sion of the Union Carbide & Carbon 
Corporation is building consumer loy- 
alty to their product — bottled gas for 
farm use. 

They're doing it with their WCAV, 
Norfolk, show called Today in School 
aired Monday to Friday, 9:30-10 a.m. 
The morning half hour may consist of 
a high school band performance, glee 
club, or dramatic show. Whatever the 
show, it is all student-written, pro- 
duced, and announced. 

Pyrofax is sponsoring 60 out of 100 
of these Today in School broadcasts 
I 20 weeks, five times weekly). The re- 
maining 40 programs are sponsored by 
other local companies. 

In addition, William and Mary Col- 
lege in Williamsburg evinced interest 

Unplanned W Sit promotion 
sends poetry sales soaring 

Most publishers will agree that the 
appeal of poetry books is limited to a 
specialized reading public. They rare- 
ly or never approach the sales figures 
of the "who-dun-its," or historical nov- 
els. But, in Atlanta, a book called 
"Poems with Power" is enjoying un- 
usual success thanks to WSB radio pro- 
motion — unplanned promotion at that. 

Dudley McCaskill of WSB was look- 
ing for something with continuity and 
human interest to wind up his daily 
7:15-45 a.m. program of news and mu- 
sic called Merry-Go-Round. While pon- 
dering his problem, he ran across the 
book, "Poems with Power," published 
by Abingdon-Cokesbury Press. Next 
day, as a trial run, he used one of the 
verses to close the program. An ava- 
lanche of complimentary phone calls 
followed. 

McCaskill worked his way steadily 
through the book, reading one verse 
each day. An average of 150 to 175 
letters per month came in. Since much 
of the mail consisted of requests for 
the source of the verse, regular credit 
was given on the air each day for book, 
publisher, and compiler, James Mudge. 

The publishers report that sales of 
"Poem with Power" have rocketed. 

He is still reading it and the un- 
planned promotion continues success- 
fully, with fan mail comments and 
sales of the book showing an above- 
average and continued rise. * * * 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



in the shows before the) went on the 
air. So much so, that tbe college grant- 
ed $1,500 in funds to let William and 
Mary faculty members travel to differ- 
ent bigh schools, help supervise shows. 
The result is a four- way dividend in 
sales and goodwill: satisfied sponsors 
and WCAV executives; pleased high 
school students with an interesting ex- 
tra-curricular activity, and William 
and Mary faculty members who have 
a chance to look over and screen prom- 
ising high school youngsters who ma) 
soon be entering the college. * * * 

1951 radio outlooh good: 
Goodwill Stations- Patt 

Outlook at the Goodwill Stations in 
1951 is for further business increases 
of 10-15% over 1950 sales. This pre- 
diction is made by Goodwill President 
John F. Patt (stations are WJR, De- 
troit; WGAR, Cleveland; KMPC. Hol- 
lywood I . 

At a recent two-day meeting in 
New York of Goodwill Station execu- 
tives. Patt revealed that the three Good- 
will Stations showed a business in- 
crease over each preceding month. 




Goodwill Stations and Edw. Petry execs confer 

This, in spite of additional TV and 
AM competition. Key to their success: 
community service plus heavy local 
selling added to their national business. 

Patt mentioned that WJR, for the 
first time in 24 years, grossed $3,519.- 
151, an increase of a quarter-million 
dollars over 1949. 

Standing left to right in the picture 
are Franklin Mitchell, WJR program 
director; Worth Kramer, WJR vice 
president and general manager: Ar- 
thur McPhillips, WJR sales service di- 
rector, and Carl George, WGAR vice 
president and general manager. Presi- 
dent John F. Patt is seated at the head 
of the table immediately in front of 
Worth Kramer. To Patt's left is Ed- 
ward Petry. president of rep firm. *** 




^r 



Tulsa Stores 
Lead in Sales 

KANSAS CITY, Jan. 12— (JP) 
Department store sales in the first 
week this year made big gains over 
the same period in 1950 in the tenth 
federal reserve district. 



Tulsa led with a 66 per cent 
rise according to the federal 
bank's weekly report. The gain 
for the entire district was 38 per 
cent. 

All states in the district also 
i showed an increase in percentage of 
sales for the four weeks ending Jan- 
uary 6 compared with the same 
period a year ago. Wichita topped 
this period with a 27 per cent gain, 
compared with a district average of 
plus 18. 

Here is the percentage of in- 
orease for the week ending January 
6: Colorado 35, Kansas 42, Missouri 
32, Nebraska 33 and Oklahoma 50; 
Denver 33, Wichita 53, Kansas City 
(Mo.) 32, St. Joseph 19, Oklahoma 
City 38 and Tulsa 66 



The above article reprinted trom the 
Jan. 12 Tulsa Tribune again demon- 
strates why the Tulsa Market Area, in 
northeastern Oklahoma, is Oklahoma's 
No. 1 Market. 

Only KVOO blankets this market, in 

addition to bonus coverage of rich 

counties in Missouri, Kansas and 

Arkansas. 

Edward Petry 8C Co. Inc. 

National Representatives 



NBC AFFILIATE 
50,000 Watts 




BLANKETS OKLAHOMA'S 
NO. 1 MARKET 



45 



wanted: 




for the 
hottest spots 
in Denver! 

How'd you like to have 
4 "live" salesmen selling your 
account's product in 4 gigantic 
super markets 10 times a day, 
six days a week! Food, soap 
or drink time buyers, check 
KTLN right NOW! 

Mrs. M. P. Ratliff, first winner 
of KILN'S every hour, on the hour 
lucky number tontest, receives $100 
prize money from Burt Bales, 
King "Soopers" store manager. 




Wire, phone or urite for 
availabilities: Radio Reps., Inc., 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles. 
San Francisco or John Buchanan 



KTLN 

1000 WATTS 

DENVER'S 

only independent! 
Non-directional station 



r? 



if 



/TIN 

V 



rtLTTO 



Mil 




Reader inquiries below were answered recent- 
ly by SPONSOR'S Research Dept. Answer* 
are provided by phone or mail. Call MU. 
8-2772; write 510 Madison Ave., New York 22. N. Y. 



Q. Have you ever done a §tory on The Greatest Story Ever Told? 

Network researcher, New York 

A. sponsor did a full-length story on the ABC program. It was 
called "Sans advertising," ran in the May 1947 issue. A "p.s." 
appeared on page 14 of the February 1948 issue, and an edito- 
rial in the April 1948 magazine. 

Q. Who owns the picture "Lightning That Talks"? 

European radio network, Luxembourg 

A. The film is the property of the All-Radio Presentation Com- 
mittee, Inc.; bookings are handled by the BAB, 270 Park Ave- 
nue, New York. 

Q. Has SPONSOR ever done any articles on the Progressive or 
Liberty Broadcasting Systems? Advertising agency, New York 

A. "Play ball: 1950" in the 10 April 1950 issue describes the 
Liberty Broadcasting System. A "p.s." on Liberty appeared in 
the 14 August sponsor. In 9 October, Sponsor Report mention 
was made of both these small-station network systems. 

Q. Can you give us the names of several advertising agencies out- 
side of New York that handle advertising beamed to the Ameri- 
can Negro? Radio station manager, Rosenburg, Tex. 

A. Gardner Advertising Company, 915 Olive St., St. L., Mo.; 
Henri, Hurst & McDonald, Inc., 121 West Wacker Drive, Chi- 
cago; Ralph H. Jones Company, Carew Tower, Cincinnati; 
Joseph Katz Company, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore. 

Q. We'd like some details on the telecast of the All-Star football 
game from Chicago last August. Advertising agency, New York 

A. The program was co-sponsored by General Mills, Inc., and 
the Wilson Sporting Goods Company and was a DuMont telecast 
over WGN-TV in Chicago. 

Q. In which issues of SPONSOR is there mention made of Fritz 
Snyder? Advertising agency, New York 

A. Mr. Snyder, now with the Biow Company as a special field 
representative of their TV program department, was mentioned 
in "What makes Bulova tick?" in the 28 March 1949 issue. He 
also received editorial mention in Applause, 9 October 1950. 

Q. What do you have on radio success stories in the appliance and 
paint lines? Broadcasting association, New York 

A. See the 10 April 1950 sponsor, "It happens every spring." 
Also our Radio Results sections in the 10 April; 8 May; 3 July; 
31 July; 23 October issues (1950) and the 15 January 1951 
Radio Results page. 

Q. Who produces the film commercials for Mott's Apple Juice, 
Birds Eye and Ajax Cleanser? Advertising agency, New York 

A. Mott's Apple Juice and Birds Eye commercials are pro- 
duced by Young & Rubicam. Agency for Ajax Cleanser is 
Ted Bates. 



\G 



SPONSOR 





Now in its sixth season, the U.S. Steel Hour— radio's 
most honored show— is bringing to America's radio audience 
another great year of THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR. 
Coming up this season are such outstanding productions 
as Good-bye, Mr. Chips; Come Back, Little Sheba; 
and a special hour-and-a-half adaptation of Hamlet. 
These programs of superb drama— with stars of stage, 
screen and radio — are heard Sunday evenings 
at 8:30 p.m. (EST; on the NBC network. 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



47 



K8&* 



Half ofttie Married People 

in ifie KFAB Area are Women 




By Harry Burke 

Qeneral Manager 



Yes — half of the married people are women — BUT, 81% of all the radio listening is by women, 
both daytime and nighttime. Furthermore, women are the motivating force behind 92% of ALL 
purchases. 

This is one of the biggest reasons why radio is the best advertising medium today. The people you 
must sell, to make profitable sales, are women. They are the ones you can reach easiest, most often 
and at least expense. 

In KFAB's great "Midwest Empire", according to recent reports from Hooper and Conlan, more women 
listen to KFAB than any other radio station. 

It is non-sense that "half of the married people are women" — BUT, nonsense-that-makes-sense be- 
cause women are your largest group of listeners and your best prospects. 

KFAB offers you this year's audience at this year's price. Let us submit program ideas and availabilities to 
help you sell more women. 



V v \ \ \ \ I I I / / / / 



/ / 

/ 




Represented by FREE & PETERS INC. 



48 



General Manager, HARRY BURKE 

SPONSOR 



intlex 




I 




Second huh'- vol. 4 



JULY THROUGH 
DECEMBER 1950 

Issued every six months 



Automotive end Lubricants 

Local auto dealer reports unusual radio suc- 
cess 

Automobile activities in radio/TV forecast .... 

Shell shows how to keep dealers happy 

Ford dealer buys vacation program 

Gulf Oil promotes products through safety 

campaign _ 

Radio/TV outdraw newspapers in Amoco test 
Chevrolet sponsors Notre Dame games _. 

Atlantic Refining's football sponsorship 

Chevrolet's unique spot commercials 

How Ford dealer grossed $83,821 in 24 hours 



Broadcast Advertising Problems antl 
Developments 



Candy strong on TV 



17 July 



3 July 


P- 


35 


17 July 


P- 


29 


14 Aug. 


P- 


22 


28 Aug. 


P- 


45 


II Sept. 


P- 


44 


11 Sept. 


P- 


45 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


25 Sept. 


P. 


32 


6 Nov. 


P- 


41 


4 Dec. 


P- 


42 



What's happening to radio networks in TV 

era? 17 July 

Merchandising is like fingerprint- ..... 28 Aug. 

Ml quiet on the TV union front 28 Aug. 

How TV union problems differ from radio's. ... 28 Aug. 

Sponsor's view of World War II 11 Sept. 

What should advertisers do about radio/TV 
budgets in face of defense-imposed 
scarcities? 25 Sept. 

Ad strategy to meet Korean situation 9 Oct. 

What can sponsors do about incidents like 

Jean Muir's? . _ — 23 Oct. 

Why sponsors are cold to nighttime network 

radio : - - — 6 Nov. 

Network's reply to sponsors' appraisal of night- 
time radio *. 20 Nov. 

[ndustry-wide audience promotion advocated 

to sell radio - — - 4 Dec. 

Will radio rates increase in non-TV markets? 4 Dec. 

Clothing 

Novel quiz show sells for Richmond clothing 
concern 

Sanson Hosiery Mills' one-shot TV success .... 

Furs on the air _ _ 

Cowboys sell clothes in radio 

Brassiere sales get a lift via TV 

Robert Hall continues strong air promotion 
Frank B. Sawdon. Robert Hall Clothes, profile 
Miles Shoe Stores' transcribed commercials .... 

Robert Hall's transcribed commercials 

Clothing stores on the air 

Selling "unmentionables'" on the air 

Commercials ami Sales Aitls 

Announcer's importance in radio sales pitch ... 

Mail orders thrive via TV 

Singing commercials, trends, costs, who makes 

them, who uses them 

TV station breaks sell for Horton's Ice Cream 
Low pressure commercials sell tours over 

WABF, New York 

Sales theme during World War II 

Brassiere sales commercials on TV . 

Sponsors like spot radio — 

Inside story of an animated commercial 

TV pitchman in the parlor 

Department store's camouflaged commercials 

Inside story of a film commercial _ _ 

Transcribing a commercial — 

Confections and Soft Drinks 

W. S. Brown, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, profile 
Soft drinks on the air 



p. 79 
p. 21 



28 
42 
32 



p. 38 

p. 42 

p. 38 

p. L'l 

p. 21 



28 

36 



3 July 


P- 


35 


31 JuK 


P- 


16 


31 Julv 


P- 


32 


11 Sept. 


P- 


21 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


23 Oct. 


P- 


18 


6 Nov. 


P- 


16 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


P- 


32 


4 Dec. 


P- 


34 


lids 






3 July 


P- 


34 


17 July 


P- 


22 


17 July 


P- 


43 


31 July 


P- 


40 


1 1 \ug. 


P- 


39 


11 Sept. 


P- 


32 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


25 Sept. 


P- 


30 


9 Oct. 


P- 


28 


9 Oct. 


P- 


34 


9 Oct. 


P- 


47 


23 Oct. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


p. 


26 


titles 

3 July 


P- 


14 


3 July 


P- 


19 



Horton's [ce I ream T\ station breaks 31 July 

Cisco Kid sells Coca-Cola 11 Sept. 

Developments in soft drinks industry 20 Nov. 

Contests and Offers 

Telephone quiz shows growing 3 July- 
Type of sponsors using telephone shows 17 July 
Syndicated telephone shows available 17 July 

Use of premiums on radio and TV 17 July 

What's doing on contest front? 17 July 

Telephone shows guarantee low-cost audience 31 July 



Drugs and Cosmetics 

G. J. Abrams, Block Drug Company, profile 17 



July 

July 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



Vlka-Seltzer sales soared with barn dance 

broadcasts 31 
Rhodes Pharmacal Company signs Gabriel 

Heatter 28 

Drug stores on the air 28 

St. Joseph Aspirin likes Westerns 11 

Basil L. Emery, Chesebrough Mfg. Co., profile 25 

How Bristol-Myers rides the trends 9 
Peoples Drug Stores in Washington go all out 

with radio 23 

Bristol-Myers using TV heavily ... 23 

Hadacol's sales prescription is advertising .... 23 

Selling laxatives and deodorants on the air _. 4 

W. A. Wright, Jules Montenier, Inc., profile. ... 18 

Hailacol packs 'em in 18 

Farm Radio 

Influence of bain dances on rural and city au- 
diences 31 July 

Murphy Products (feed) a 20-year barn dance 

sponsor 31 July 

Doughboy knows the farmer 28 Aug. 

Farm director, a potent salesman 9 Oct. 

Food and Beverages 

Borden's new emphasis: spot advertising _ 3 July 

Giant markets and chains showing interest in 

radio/TV .__ 17 July 

Coffee (inns must advertise to protect against 

competing brands 17 July 

Growing use of radio and TV resulting in 

increased volume for bread and cake 

companies — ~ — 17 July 

John I. Moone, Snow Crop Marketers, Inc., 

profile — - 31 July 

Ralston Purina Company, Grand Ole Opry 

success 31 July 

Nabisco dog biscuit sales impact achieved 

with radio 31 July 

Taylor-Reed's TV success in selling Cocoa 

Marsh . 11 Sept. 

Breakfast food cereals do well with cowboy 

shows 11 Sept. 

Victor Coffee began going places with radio 11 Sept. 

Bakers on the air 25 Sept. 

Food market's TV sales formula in Baltimore 25 Sept. 
Lee Mack Marshall, Continental Baking Co., 

profile 9 Oct. 

Chiquita Banana goes to TV cooking school .. 9 Oct. 
Hormel's triple-threat girl- 9 Oct. 

Grocery stores on the air _ 23 Oct. 

Worcester Baking Company keeps ahead with 

radio 6 Nov. 

Woman's hands sell food products on TV 6 Nov. 

R. G. Partridge. United Fruit Company, pro- 

,,!,. .... 20 Nov. 

Douglas Leigh. Leigh Foods. Inc.. profile 4 Dec. 



p. 30 

p. 40 

p. 22 

p. 18 



p. 22 
p.108 
p.108 
p.] 14 
p.116 
p. 26 



p. 20 



19 

17 
30 
22 
16 
32 



p. 18 

p. 24 

p. 40 

p. 34 

p. 8 

p. 24 



p. 19 

p. 22 

p. 24 

p. 30 



p. 26 
p. 30 
p. 30 

p. 30 
p. 12 
p. 20 
p. 23 
p. 18 

p. 21 

p. 24 
p. 23 
p. 42 

p. 16 

p. 20 
p. 26 

p. L'l 

p. 28 
p. 40 

p. 10 
p. 10 



BINDERS are available to accommodate six-month supply of issues indexed. Cost is $4.00 per binder. 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



49 



Milk sales zoom via WTMA and Cisco Kid 4 Dec. 

More about grocery store advertising 18 Dec. 

Margarine opportunity in radio/TV 18 Dec. 

CBS-WFBL sell for 55 food stores 18 Dec. 

insurance and Finance 

Seattle bank uses radio news with good results 28 Aug. 

I, \o\. 

20 Nov. 



Banks on the air 

Why Metropolitan Life expanded radio budget 



p. 43 

p. 16 

p. 30 

p. 42 



p. 17 
p. 26 
p. 28 



20 
lo 
30 
32 

40 

11 



Miscellaneous Products antl Services 

How to sell a candidate 3 July p. 16 

Beer and wine companies using air media 

extensively 17 July p. 31 

Quaker rug TV experience 14 Aug. p. 17 

Radio advertising and home demonstrations 

boost TV set sales _ 14 Aug. p. 26 

Storage business boosted by radio 28 Aug. p. 45 

60% of Mohawk Carpet budget going to TV 11 Sept. p. 28 

Houses sell like hot cakes via WSRS, Cleve- 
land _. - 11 Sept. p. 44 

Miller Brewing Company, uses football formu- 
la for sales _ 25 Sept. 

Arthur Murray, profile 23 Oct. 

Kosher wines selling to booming mass market 23 Oct. 

Books on Radio/TV for ad managers 6 Nov. 

Oil burners, hot sales item on WFBR, Balti- 
more 6 Nov. 

Radio sells homes in volume in Eureka, Calif. 20 Nov. 

Programing 

Telephone gimmicks abound on the air 3 July p. 22 

Dummy is MC on clothing firm quiz show.... 3 July p. 35 

Bobby Benson Western-type show expands... 17 July p. 22 

Syndicated telephone shows available 17 July p. 108 

Radio barn dances, successful sales formula 31 Jul) p. 19 

Nearly every station has telephone show 31 July p. 26 

KOME'S novel participation show 31 July p. 40 

Liberty's baseball broadcasts 14 Aug. p. 17 

Moppets hypo adult viewing — 14 Aug. p. 24 

The Negro d.j. strikes it rich 14 Aug. p. 28 

Cowboy club corrals national capital kiddies 14 Aug. p. 38 

Tips to news sponsor 28 Aug. p. 17 

Beecham recordings sell baking products 11 Sept. p. 18 

How cowboys rate as radio salesmen 11 Sept. p. 21 

Football takes to the air in 1950 ..... 25 Sept. p. 20 

When to simulcast 25 Sept. p. 26 

TV revives Wild-West fever . 25 Sept. p. 28 

Chiquita Banana's daytime TV chores 9 Oct. p. 20 

Radio mysteries rate high in listenership 9 Oct. p. 23 

Network musical show clicks for Hormel 9 Oct. p. 26 

Program trends key to Bristol-Myers radio 

success 9 Oct. p. 32 

TV mystery shows strong program fare 23 Oct. p. 32 

Taped TV shows lowering program costs 6 Nov. p. 38 

Nelwork co-op programs 20 Nov. p. 30 

Advantages of network-built package shows 20 Nov. p. 40 

Local shows do great job for national sponsors 18 Dec. p. 21 

TV writer: key to program costs 18 Dec. p. 32 

Publicitg and Promotion 

Stimulating summer selling 3 July p. 16 

Balloon promotion pays off 3 July p. 34 

Station directs selling campaign to staff 3 July p. 34 

Tucson station plugs summer selling campaign 3 July 

I BS launches biggest fall promotion „ 14 Aug. 

Merchandising is like fingerprints - - 28 Aug. 

Wli.ii stations do to help sponsors sell products 11 Sept. 
30,000 grocers, druggists take part in CBS 

promotion 20 Nov. 

Research 

Sindlinger's share-of-audience measurement _ 3 July 

More detailed data on TV coverage sought .... 3 July 

Hofstra T\ study lalks dollars and cents _. 17 July 
AH HI, Lazarsfelii, Dim & HracLtreet studies 

show radio power 17 July 

Radio and TV research, techniques used ... 17 .Tidy 
Let's piii all media under same microscope .... 31 July 
What media learn up bc-l with T\ '. .—. 31 July 
Ohio State stud) discloses influence of mop- 
pets in TV viewing 14 Aug. p. 24 
Radio is getting bigger, recent studies show 14 Aug. p. 30 
Radio gaining in non-TV areas, according to 

WNAX study 11 Sept. p. 30 

Getting the mosl oul ol HMH 25 Sept. p. 34 



p. 35 

p. 38 

p. 21 

p. 26 

p. 44 



p. 24 

p. 30 

p. 48 

p. 52 
p.Ul 

p. 21 

p. .-Id 



The research muddle 23 Oct. p. 28 

Herbert True checks TV sponsor identification 

in Chicago 6 Nov. p. 29 

Who's looking where? 4 Dec. p. 18 

Advertest's looking vs. listening study 4 Dec. p. 29 

Retail 

Clothing company in Richmond uses unique 

TV formula for sales 3 July p. 35 

Giant markets, chains using more radio/TV 17 July p. 30 

Drug stores on the air, roundup 28 Aug. p. 30 

Buffalo store scores sales success on WEBR 28 Aug. p. 44 

Food market's TV sales formula in Baltimore 25 Sept. p. 42 
Department store buys time to keep customers 

away 9 Oct. p. 46 

Department store's camouflaged commercials 9 Oct. p. 47 

Grocery stores on the air, roundup _. 23 Oct. p. 21 

Clothing stores on the air, roundup 20 Nov. p. 32 

Grocery store advertising pays off _ 18 Dec. p. 16 

CBS-WFBL sell for 55 food stores _... 18 Dec. p. 42 

Soaps, Cleansers, Toilet Goods 

P&G, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, and Lever Bros. 

riding high 17 July p. 31 

Robert Brenner, B. T. Babbitt Company, pro- 
file 28 Aug. p. 16 

Sidney Weil, American Safety Razor Corp., 

profile 11 Sept 

Pears soap scores with radio 11 Sept 

How Duz does its commercials 

Pal Blade strategy clicks on radio 

Television 

More detailed data on TV coverage sought .... 
What part of budget should be allotted TV? 
TV sales punch illustrated in Hofstra study _ 

TV status in fall 1950 

One-shot TV success 

Vidicam cuts film cost _ 

Moppets influence adult nighttime viewing 

Taylor-Reed succeeds in TV debut 

60% of Mohawk budget going to TV 

TV sells brassieres 

TV revives Wild-West fever 

Daytime TV pioneering by Chiquita Banana 

Pitchman in the parlor 

Inside story of film commercial 

T\ mysteries rated high 

Taped TV shows, a program cost factor 

Woman's hands sell foods on TV 

Will color catch on? 

Timebuging 

Outlook for time availabilities for inde- 
pendents 

What agencies would tell clients, if they dared 

Are radio/TV subjected to tougher scrutiny in 
selection of media?..... 

What sponsors think of agencies 

How sectional agency can help national ac- 
count 

Ad strategy to meet Korean situation 

Why sponsors are cold to nighttime network 

Network co-op shows for spot buyers 

Confessions of a New York timebuyer 

What to sell in wartime 

Glamour boys of bigtime advertising 

What are the true conditions in timebuying? 

Tobacco 

Big radio/TV activity seen for cigarette com- 
panies 17 July p. 31 

Millions more call for Philip Morris ~ . 31 July p. 16 

Uexander Harris, Ronson Art Metal Works, 

profile 14 Aug. p. 14 

R. J. Reynolds football plans .. 25 Aug. p. 20 

I low Brown & Williamson climbed to 25 bil- 
lion cigarettes 6 Nov. p. 21 

Brown & Williamson formula gives brands 

special appeal 20 Nov. p. 24 

Transcriptions 

National advertisers' use of transcriptions 17 July p. 55 

Library and program transcription services 17 July p. 56 

Transcriptions offer low-cost, top-talent shows 4 Dec. p. 21 



11 Sept. 


P- 


16 


11 Sept. 


P- 


18 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


4 Dec. 


P- 


24 


3 July 


P- 


30 


3 July 


P- 


32 


17 July 


P- 


48 


17 July 


P- 


87 


31 July 


P- 


16 


31 July 


P- 


40 


14 Aug. 


P- 


24 


11 Sept. 


P- 


18 


11 Sept. 


P- 


28 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


25 Sept. 


P- 


28 


9 Oct. 


P- 


20 


9 Oct. 


P- 


34 


23 Oct. 


P- 


26 


23 Oct. 


P- 


32 


6 Nov. 


P- 


38 


6 Nov. 


P- 


40 


20 Nov. 


P- 


35 



31 July 


P- 


38 


14 Aug. 


P- 


19 


14 Aug. 


P- 


36 


28 Aug. 


P- 


26 


11 Sept. 


P. 


42 


9 Oct. 


P- 


42 


6 Nov. 


P- 


24 


20 Nov. 


P- 


30 


4 Dec. 


P- 


26 


18 Dec. 


P- 


26 


18 Dec. 


P- 


28 


18 Dec. 


P- 


34 




:#] 





Conducted by B 



and Benson, Inc. in WCCO 



Siarg 



S 5 °-' 00 °/° BMB Day-Night 



Area, Fall 1950 




EXTRA 



, H«B m TIMES 
STENERS DUN AM 

NORTHWEST STATION 



■at a cosMofonly 43 cents 



Nugrhout 112 Northwest 
,; where 91 fi 79n " wesc 



per thousand! 



<»ff&cr than it was f n .+ f 
Seven days a w?e k WcCO°^ ea, ' S aRO '> is ** in ever, 

than 6 times more listeners than T' th ° USand of WCC O a T l 'T Cost ^- 
vtl 189 stati °« S heard in i K 43 ce "^ delivery 2%?" *F* fa °' lIy 

> wccoa, a .w hat , mo ^; c s KV hat ' s :: ^^SS: 

°ie«k on the next station. 



CAMERA AND PROPS 

I Continual from / 

roway At Large show i NBC-TV i spon- 
sored l>\ Congoleum-Nairn, Inc. The 
pitch used to sell Nairn Inlaid Lino- 
leum is that double certification is pro- 
\ ided- a guarantee from the manufac- 
turer and dealer both. A neat dodge. 
therefore, was to produce a double 
image of Garroway by superimposi- 
t ion. One of the Garroways, natural- 
ly, represented the manufacturer; one 
the dealer. In loth roles. Garroway 



brandished a guarantee. 

'"Right from the outset, we decided 
to take advantage of both the audio 
and visual impact of TV on the Gar- 
roway show." says Charles Wolfe, au- 
thor of a forthcoming book on tele- 
vision advertising, and director of ra- 
dio/TV commercials at McCann-Erick- 
son. "Our agency research department 
proved our theories correct." 

(This strategy fitted in nicely with 
Garroway's program, which is famous 
for its gimmicks, anyway. In one com- 
mercial. Garrowav is supposed to sell 



Recipe for TV results 
in Central Ohio . . . 




Edwina lanes is a nationally-known home economist. Televiewers like her 
easy style of step-by-step food preparation and demonstrations . . . inter- 
spersed with friendly tips and helpful information for the homemaker. 



STUDIO "K" Mrs. Zones' Kitchen 

How big can a kitchen get? This one is a popular 
part of thousands of TV homes . . . and a profit- 
able place to demonstrate food products, appli- 
ances, and other items for homemakers. 

Mrs. Zanes' Kitchen shows a phenomenal mail 
count — month after month — for advertisers on 
this well-known participation program. For ex- 
ample, a recent offer brought in over°00 requests 
for a recipe pamphlet. For other specific mail 
counts and details about Studio K, phone your 
Blair TV representative or write. 



r^1WBNS-TV 



CBS-TV Network- 
andWBNS-AM 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 
Channel 10 
Affiliated with Columbus Dispatch 
Sales Office: 33 North High Street 



the indented lines in Congo Wall that 
make it look like tile. But the lines 
cannot be seen clearly via the camera. 
Garroway solves this by asking the 
stageman to lower a boom mike beside 
the Congo Wall. The camera takes a 
closeup of Garroway's hand; simul- 
taneously he rubs his fingernails across 
the product, so that the audience can 
actually hear the clicks of the indenta- 
tions. The sound and image combined 
strikinglj make the point.) 

2. Lettiny the camera act 

One interesting thing a program pro- 
ducer can do is to let the camera act 
for him on occasion. This is cleverly 
illustrated by Harvester Cigar's sus- 
pense show. The Plainclothesman 
I DTN ) , in which the camera plays the 
title role throughout each program. As 
the gumshoe lieutenant, the versatile 
camera eats lemon meringue pie, gets 
into fist fights, blinks its eyes, and ex- 
ercises an insatiable craving for Har- 
vester Cigars. Of course, an actor 
i ken Lynch I does help the camera 
out. but his hands are the only mem- 
bers of his body visible to the view- 
ing audience. Crouched under the' 
lens. Lynch, a script in one hand, a 
cigar in the other, helps give the illu- 
sion that the camera is an animate 
being. When Lynch lights up a cigar 
and simultaneously speaks, a stagehand 
puffs like mad on a cigar joined by a 
piece of rubber tubing to a holder just 
beneath the lens, and lo, smoke eddies 
forth, apparently from the camera's 
lips. 

This dramatic plug for the product 
extends through the show into the com- 
mercial. Then Jack Orrison, who plays 
Sergeant Brady in the show, is seen 
exuding satisfaction as he puffs a Har- 
vester Cigar into the face of the audi- 
ence. Moreover, he shows how cozily 
the stogey fits into his vest pocket. 

The show's director-producer, 45- 
year-old Bill Marceau, gained his stage- 
craft experience as a special effects 
man for MGM ( The Wizard of Oz, 
Beau Geste) and Broadway actor (The 
Searching Wind. The Assassin). "At 
first." he says, "we got letters from 
televiewers asking: 'Why don't you 
show the face of the Plainclothesman?' 
Now they write: T felt that / was the 
Plainclothesman last night.' At this 
stage, we can make the camera do al- 
most anything — except make love. And 
maybe, some day, we'll get around to 
that." 



52 



SPONSOR 



steady as she goes in San Francisco" 




PULSE reports 
San Francisco 
Bay area tele- 
viewing "steady 
as she goes"- 




(OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER, 1950) 

KRON-TV carried more once-a-week and 
multi-weekly programs with largest 
share of audience than the other two 
San Francisco stations combined . . . 

HOW'S THAT FOR 




PROOF 



PUTS MORE 
EYES ON 

SPOTS 



Represented nationally by FREE& PETERS, INC. . . . New York, Chicago, 
Detroit, Atlanta, Fort Worth, Hollywood. KRON-TV offices and studios 
in the San Francisco Chronicle Bldg., 5th and Mission Sts., San Francisco 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



53 



3. Background projection 

Visual variety and economy are 
fused in a number of camera tricks 
that TV producers have devised. One 
of the most commonly used devices is 
the background-projection shot. This 
technique calls for (a) a still shot from 
a slide projector or (b) an action shot 
from a movie, to be projected on the 
rear of a translucent screen. Thus, you 
get inexpensive background for a stu- 
dio set. 

The Firestone Hour (NBC-TV) is an 
adroit user of still shots for rear pro- 
jection. Recently, an opera singer sang 
before the stained glass windows and 
altar of a magnificent church — almost 
all composed of an enlarged photo- 
graphic slide. 

And numerous sponsors have used 
movie rear-projection shots to infuse 
realism into their TV productions. 
The emphasis seems to be on film ac- 
tion of flowing water. For its com- 
mercial on the Colgate Comedy Hour 
(NBC-TV), Halo Shampoo reveals a 
flowing sea in front of which sits a 
beautiful nymph on a rock, her Haloed 
hair glistening in the spray. Sweet- 
heart Soap's One Man's Family (NBC- 
TV) has depicted a boy and a girl in 



a stationary motor boat speeding 
through a filmed briny blue. And in 
order to frame its "Harbor Lights" 
ballad vividly on the Hit Parade 
(NBC-TV), Lucky Strike had its cam- 
eraman, Bernie Haber, take movie 
shots from the Staten Island Ferry off 
New York City; the consequent projec- 
tion film was so realistic that viewers 
could almost taste the salt in the water. 
Not to be neglected is the trick of 
merely picking up the natural setting 
provided in or around a TV studio. 
Nothing could be more inexpensive. 
Smart cameramen for the Bob and 
Kay (WENR-TV, Chicago) constantly 
focus their cameras on the Chicago 
skyline, which is easy, because the 
studio is located on the 42nd floor of 
a Chicago skyscraper. In Manhattan, 
Hit Parade co-producers Dan Louns- 
bery and Ted Fetter have staged dances 
in the gracious lobby and loge of their 
studio, the ex-Broadway Center Thea- 
tre. In fact, for one Hit Parade num- 
ber, "All My Love," the producers had 
the singer pose as a lovesick actress 
leaving the theatre from the 48th Street 
stagedoor entrance; when street noises 
drowned out her singing, they hid a 
pencil mike in the bouquet of roses 



BUYS NEWS 



One of the West's finest food brands, 
Dennison uses KJR Noon News — 
their only spot program buy in 
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REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY AVERY-KNOOEL, INC. 
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held by the Stagedoor Johnny who 
waited for her. 

4. Roller drum 

The roller drum is another dramatic 
action device; it's a drum on which 
charcoal drawings can be placed and 
which can be revolved quickly to pre- 
sent a swift, bizarre image which is 
then superimposed on the screen by a 
second camera. For the Ford Motor 
Company's Toast of the Town (CBS- 
TV), producer Mario Lewis wanted to 
create a ghostly effect while James Mel- 
ton sang "Riders in the Sky." Draw- 
ings of phantom riders placed on the 
roller drum did the trick. 

5. Prisms 

Several weird camera gimmicks have 
been refined by 45-year-old Albert W. 
Protzman, NBC-TV technical produc- 
tion director, who for many years was 
head sound technician at Twentieth- 
Century-Fox {Steamboat Round the 
Bend, Judge Priest). One of his spe- 
cialties is the dove inversion prism. 
When this prism is fitted over the cam- 
era lens, images are turned upside 
down. Thus, when the script calls for 
a girl to stare into a pool of water, her 
reflection can be flashed on the screen. 

A variation of this is the use of the 
multiple-faceted prism. This device 
(costing approximately $500) creates 
a wonderful montage effect; with the 
turn of a crank, it can also produce a 
rotation of images. Thus the Crossley 
commercial on NBC-TV reveals four 
refrigerators spinning around a central 
refrigerator; and the Firestone Hour 
commercial is a glittering montage dis- 
play of tires and toys. 

C. Vibration devices 

The illusion of the speaking tire has 
been achieved by the B. F. Goodrich 
Company for the commercial on Ce- 
lebrity Time (CBS-TV). Here the de- 
vice employed is the oscilloscope, a ma- 
chine similar to one used in Walt Dis- 
ney's Fantasia. It produces a wavy 
line on the screen, the waver depend- 
ing upon the kinds of sounds fed to 
the machine. (In Fantasia, the audi- 
ence saw the wobbly gyrations made 
by the sounds of oboes, harps, and 
trumpets.) In Celebrity Time, the ma- 
chine creates a wavy line which is su- 
perimposed on the tread of a Goodrich 
tire. The vibrating tire tread, in close- 
up, seems to be boasting of its own 
merits. 

"A couple of jokers complained that 
a talking tire wouldn't sound like that," 



54 



SPONSOR 




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The hand of time has wrought great change since 
the day Abraham Lincoln spoke on the battlefield 
at Gettysburg. Yet, in America his words remain 
as alive today as the instant they passed his lips. 
It remains our task to keep them alive, for they are 
the message of a free America. And standing ready 



to speed this message on its way to all of the 
corners of a troubled world is radio — the powerful, 
articulate voice of the nation. WJR takes pride 
in pledging the strength of its men, women, and 
broadcasting equipment to lend an ever increasing 
volume to this great American voice of freedom! 



Radio — A mericas Greatest 
Public Service Medium 




WJR 

THE GOODWILL STATION, Inc. 

FISHER BLDG., DETROIT 



FREE SPEECH MIKE 



CBS 
50,000 
WATTS 



Call or write your 
nearest Petry Office 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



55 



One Of The Five 

FASTEST GROWING 

T V MARKETS 

in the United States 




EVERY DAY 
DURING 1950 

An Average of 

152 FAMILIES 

Were Added To The 

WOW-TV AUDIENCE 

It Almost Doubled 
the Last Quarter 
of 1950 




2$™ 



I 



: 60 ^ 



■toS: 



7// 



FOR AVAILABILITIES CALL ANY 
BIAIR-TV OFFICE OR WEBSTER 3400 

OMAHA, NEBRASKA 



says Bob Sammon, in charge of engi- 
neer operations at CBS-TV Studios. 
"But we had them there. How exacth 
does a tire talk like?" 

A similar gimmick that has been re- 
fined at CBS-TV studios is the elec- 
tronic ripple. By turning a knob on 
this $200 device, the engineer is able 
to produce a ripply undulation on the 
screen which can be made to fluctuate 
at an increasing faster or slower pace. 
It's particiularly valuable for flashback 
scenes in psychological dramas. ("How- 
well I remember the night of 1892 
when my dear old grandmother crept 
stealthily up behind me. a stiletto in 
her hand and a curious smile on her 
face.") It probably had its most ex- 
citing demonstration, though, in the 
Ford Theatre s production of Alice in 
Wonderland, when Alice was rippled 
into more shapes than an accordion. 

7. Mirrors 

Mirrors can be used in a TV pro- 
gram either to gain an eerie effect, as 
in a Coney Island Fun Palace, or to 
save costs on the use of extra cameras. 
Here are examples of both: Hugh Rog- 
ers, executive producer of Batten, Bar- 
ton, Durstine & Osborn, TV produc- 
tions, wanted to get an unusual ef- 
fect for the rendition of that goofy 
novelty tune, "The Thing," on the Hit 
Parade. Snooky Lanson, the singer, 
winds up in Hell (with a boom! boom! 
boom! ). and the devils, after dancing 
around him in flames, are supposed to 
peer down into the mysterious box. The 
problem was to capture their down- 
ward stares. This was ultimately done 
!>\ having a mirror in the bottom of 
the box reflect their evil faces, and then 
focus the camera on the mirror image. 
The result was wonderfully macabre. 

A different problem was faced by 
NBC's Protzman when he was doing a 
scene in Ballantine's Believe It or Not 
show. His problem was to shoot a pic- 
ture of a trapped racketeer who was 
staring from a second-story window 
down at a cop on the street. Since he 
didn't want to waste time and expense 
lifting the camera up to the window. 
Protzman solved the puzzle by employ- 
ing a pair of mirrors. One minor, 
placed near the window, reflected the 
cop's image down to a second mirror 
on the ground which, in turn, reflected 
an image into the camera lens. Result: 
a picture which showed the cop as he 
would look from the window, taken 
without moving the camera an inch 
from the ground. 



8. Trick props 

Sponsors could learn much from the 
cost-cutting prop tricks of Charles 
(Chuck) Holden, 44-year-old produc- 
tion manager for ABC-TV, former 
Broadway actor-stage manager {Porgie 
and Bess, Kiss the Boys Goodbye) and 
ex-radio scriptwriter (Crime Photogra- 
pher). As a producer of 55 TV shows 
weekly and head of a staff of 200, he 
has learned that simplification of props 
can be a great money-saver. Consider 
these samples of his wizardry: 

1. For the Kellogg Company's 
Space Cadet, the prop department was 
considering the use of expensive bas- 
ketball bladders — to represent orbits 
for a camera "trip to the moon." In- 
stead, for one-tenth of the cost, Holden 
used Christmas crepe-paper balls. 

2. For the Buck Rogers Show, a 
cheap flame gun was devised: two bat- 
teries, a lighter coil, and magician's 
flash powder. Heat from the coil 
shoots the flame out miraculoush . 

3. For the commercial on the Faith 
Baldwin Theatre of Romance, a girl 
skiing while she was clad in a Maiden 
Form brassiere had to be shown dis- 
creetly. This was done (to the satis- 
faction of all prudes I when Holden 
and the William H. Weintraub agency 
had her remain stationary on skis, with 
a fan blowing at her hair one way, and 
a camera "cloud loop" moving clouds 
in the other direction. 

4. For Old Gold's Stop the Music, 
Bert Parks wanted flowers to shoot up 
from the ground magically whenever 
he sprinkled it with a watering can. 
Holden had the flowers attached to a 
series of mouse traps. From off-cam- 
era a stagehand would spring the traps 
with a long pole and as each mouse 
trap was sprung a flower would leap 
up to vertical position. 

5. For Chance of a Lifetime, experts 
said it would cost $1,000 to construct 
an electrical turntable that would stop 
at certain numbers. But for $150, 
Holden fashioned a very capable one 

-with an ordinary carpenter's nail 
stopping each revolution of the drum. 

6. For Stop the Music, a chorus line 
was supposed to be framed ingenious- 
ly while the girls danced to the ballad 
"Dancing on the Ceiling." A chande- 
lier was built to hang upside down 
from the floor. By using the dove in- 
version prism, the camera gave the il- 
lusion that the girls were dancing from 
the ceiling, their skirts, however, prop- 



56 



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57 



erlv disobeying Newton's Law of 

Gra\ ity . 

7. For a scene when a man was sup- 
posed to hurl knives at a women. Hol- 
den had a stagehand hidden behind 
the wall. Each time the man motioned 
to throw a knife, the stagehand would 
pull a trigger on a mousetrap, releasing 
a knife which would spring through 
a rubber slot from behind the girl, 
and seemingly pinion her to the wall. 
The knife-thrower, of course, didn't 
hurl a single knife. 

In evolving props. Holden adopts a 



beguilingly easy formula: "I se lal 
the quickest, ibl the cheapest, (c) the 
most fool-proof gimmick you can 
dream up. Test and retest. If there's 
the slightest possibilitx it wont work. 
invent another one.' 

Simple props can often be more ef- 
fective than animated films to enhance 
a commercial. For example, the Tide- 
water Associated Oil Company com- 
mercial employs miniature cars and a 
model gas station for its Tydol gaso- 
line and Veedol oil sales pitch. A 
stasjehand can direct the tins autos 




BROADCAST MUSIC,INC. 

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where he will, merely by pulling an in- 
visible thin black thread tied to the 
car's front axle. A "shadow box" de- 
signed by Lennen & Mitchell's Clark 
Agnew flashes lights off and on to give 
the miniature Veedol sign a starkly 
dramatic appearance. 

Says Nicholas I Nick I Keesely, vice 
president in charge of the radio/TV 
department at Lennen & Mitchell: 
"Miniature props offer you more flexi- 
lility than the 'frozen' films in this 
case. We can vary each Tidewater 
vignette and plug any seasonal item we 
want. Besides, the cost is extremelv 
reasonable." 

Admiral Corporation has used so 
simply graphic a device as that of 
spreading groceries across the floor 
and panning the camera across — just to 
illustrate how many items an Admiral 
refrigerator can hold. It has. however, 
aiso used involved Rube Goldbergian 
props invented b\ the fertile brain of 
Charles Luchsinger. co-owner of Car- 
loon Teletales. Inc.. a new New York 
TV special effects firm. When Admiral 
asked for a replica of its 24-story elec- 
tric display on Michigan Avenue in 
Chicago. Luchsinger (for $200 plus 
cost of materials ) promptly devised a 
production with flares and rockets. It 
was almost as spectacular as an atom 
bomb exploding. 

Of course, even the most ingenious 
TV effect I live as compared to film I 
can come a cropper, with embarrassing 
results. The most famous case is the 
American Safety Razor Corporation 
commercial on the Show Goes On 
I CBS-TV). Usually, m.c. Robert Q. 
Lewis hands an A.S.R. cigarette lighter 
to a guest. "I'll pay $50 to your favor- 
ite charity if this lighter doesn't work 
the first time you try it," wagers Lewis. 
The orchestra drums roll majestically : 
the camera cuts to a closeup of the 
hand holding the lighter; and, with a 
dramatic flourish, the flame pops up. 

One time, though, to Lewis' befud- 
dlement and horror, the lighter did not 
work. He turned a pistachio green and 
bleakly submitted the check to the 
guest's charity . 

"It turned out."" says Charles Wolfe. 
McCann-Erickson radio/TV commer- 
cial director, "that some wag on the set 
had drained the lighter fluid from the 
lighter. The sponsor was somewhat per- 
turbed at first. But the episode gained 
so much publicity for the lighter that, 
in the end, everybody was happy." 

Summing tip . . . 

If the sponsor wants to get the best 



58 



SPONSOR 



use out of his TV special effects, he 
would do well to listen to these general 
theories expressed by the experts to 

SPONSOR; 

1. Try to select a producer who has 
had either theatrical or movie experi- 
ence and who isn't afraid to experi- 
ment. 

2. Use long shots sparingly only to 
establish a scene. Goseups obviously 
are better suited to a small screen and 
a parlor audience. 

3. Use a simple prop gimmick in 
preference to a trick one. The compli- 
cated one may blow up in your face. 

4. Experiment with lighting effects. 
Several experts claim the present hot 
studio lights are too bright. Blue and 
purple filters may provide a better 
image definition and eliminate the 
"flat lighting" impression. 

5. Experiment with scenic effects to 
gain economy. Only recently. 2 Feb- 
ruary. Caldwell Laboratories, New 
York, introduced its revolutionary 
Scenescope for telecasting Trapped on 
WOR-TV. 

This electronic-optical camera adds 
a third dimension to stage scenery. An 
actor walking across a bare stage can 
be made to appear surrounded on both 
sides, front and back, by live persons 
and live scenery. Invented over a pe- 
riod of 10 years by Frank Caldwell, at 
\ a cost of $100,000. the Scenescope will 
be leased out to sponsors at a charge 
of $200 and up, depending on the 
amount of "scenery" demanded. 

6. Try to use 35 mm. film shots 
rather than 16 mm. shots for rear pro- 
jection. You'll get more detail on the 
screen. 

7. Avoid excessive camera cutbacks, 
just for the sake of keeping all the 
equipment busy. Similarly, don't use 
too many split screens and reverse 
images, just to be tricky. Hollywood, 
too. passed through this phase. 

8. If possible, hire a special ef- 
fects man, who can devote his time to 
enhancing both your program and 
your commercial. 

So speedily is the special effects de- 
partment of TV advancing, sponsor 
found in its survey, that the field seems 
to be well ahead of the programing. 



writing, and talent divisions 



and 



ahead of advertisers who aren't using 
camera and props to the full. 

The sponsor need not be a magician 
to make his TV production a profitable 
one. He need only steep himself in the 
tricks of the new medium, then apply 
(hem discriminately. * * * 




Psk The 
Man 

Who Knows 




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MR 
ATLANTA 



NATIONAL REP. 

JOHN BLAIR 

IN SOUTH EAST 

CHAS C COLEMAN 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



59 



COLUMBIA WORKSHOP 

i Continued from page 25 I 

of other people's offerings: at his worst 
he is marred by prejudice, blind spots, 
lapses in appraisal. Although New 
York is full of scouts, and promoters, 
and packagers, subway-rush network 
program departments, newcomers com- 
plain, almost universally, of the torture 
of trying to be seen or heard. Would- 
be crashers of television sit puzzled 
bour on puzzled hour while the em- 
ployed staffers of the new industry 
burst madly through doors too frantic 
to stop even for a greeting. Plainly. 
TV in New York is, just now, one de- 
mented, labyrinthic rat race. 

So back to the Columbia Workshop. 
Here was a show that made a point of 
being receptive to new ideas and new 
people. Its supreme usefulness was 
openness lieeause the \\ orkshop was 
exempt from the weekly ratings strug- 
gle. Fear of a bad rating, or no rat- 
ing, the ignominious L.T. (Less Than 
1 ' ( I . made cowards of program- 
makers generally but couldn't touch 
the Workshop which had no format, 
was never twice the same, eagerly wel- 
comed the unknown and the untried. 



The Workshop was sponsored by one 
organization and that organization 
reaped the kudos but it is possible 
that, in time to come, a Workshop for 
TV program experimenting might be 
co-operatively financed. 

Certainly all of radio benefitted 
from the Columbia Workshop which 
broke new ground, posted new roads 
of program know-how. widened show- 
manship horizons. Innumerable stu- 
dio devices taken for granted todav 
were pioneered by Workshoppers. 
New mines of entertainment "raw ma- 
terial" were staked out. Hence it is 
timely at this point in video to turn 
hack the pages and reread the lessons. 
I he workshop's history, and antece- 
dent influences, coincided with the 
emerging technical maturity of radio 
which in its time sweated out program 
problems remarkably similar to pro- 
gram problems today in video. 

One thing should be made clear 
straight off. Here is no paean to "artsy- 
craftsy" poseur stuff. Some of that 
was perpetrated on and by the Work- 
shop, and raised sponsor eyebrows 15 
years ago as it would raise them again 
today if repeated. 

Equally the Workshop story must be 



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put firmly in the context of its own 
times and these carefully distinguished 
from the facts of television life in 
1951. Just as a starter, we recall that 
when the Columbia Workshop was 
launched on 18 July, 1936, depression 
wage scales prevailed. Unions were 
then few and weak. Hours of rehear- 
sal were long and unchallenged. Writ- 
ers were eager and cheap. Directors 
drooled for love of prestige and pub- 
licity. The total weekly budget for the 
1936 Workshop would hardlv pav, in 
1951. for the camera crew alone. 
Nonetheless, after due allowance for 
the differences in era and economics, 
it is still worth studying the radio 
model. 

The story proper begins with Wil- 
liam B. Lewis, now with the Kenyon 
& Eckhardt agency but formerly pro- 
gram vice president of CBS. He sums 
up this way: "I doubt that any other 
one radio venture came within a hun- 
dred city blocks of doing so much as 
did the Columbia Workshop. It de- 
veloped writers, adaptors, conductors, 
actors, directors: it. pioneered entirely 
new techniques in sound effects and 
musical scores: it gave CBS a reputa- 
tion for progress and inventiveness 
that drew new talent like a magnet." 

Lewis was the administrator who 
authorized the Columbia Workshop 
and okayed the budget. The actual 
founding father of the Workshop was 
an engineer-turned-writer and eager 
beaver named Irving Reis. Reis had 
written a number of scripts and at- 
tracted some attention, notably from 
the New York Post's highbrow critic. 
Aaron Stein, who sugared up Reis the 
way a- kid sugars up cornflakes. Reis 
had also been to Europe and been fired 
by British and German radio experi- 
ments. All of which was a far cry 
from his first job at CBS. He had been 
taken on originally as standby log 
engineer at master controls under an 
old Federal regulation (relic of the 
Titanic disaster of 1912) which re- 
quired constant 600 metre watch for 
distress signals at sea. At this lonely 
vigil Reis did not succumb to the typi- 
cal bored engineer's ear which hears 
only SOS's or line breakdowns. In- 
stead he absorbed the words and mu- 
sic, the jokes and payoffs and became, 
in the process, a student of program 
content. 

Neither Lewis nor Reis foresaw the 
impact of the Workshop upon the audi- 
ence, the trade, advertising, and the 
personal destinies of Reis. Certainly 



60 



SPONSOR 



main at CBS that summer shrugged 
off the Workshop as "just one more 
summer sustainer" which would he 
gone with the butterflies. Variety, 
usualh alert, waited three weeks be- 
fore reviewing the series and then mis- 
spelled Reis as Reece. Old hands at 
the Variety shop supposed that the 
Workshop was just a new name for 
the Columbia Dramatic Guild. 

It needs to be emphasized that Reis 
and his Workshop were products of a 
special kind of organization. CBS. 
where economy and make-do and im- 
provisation were the order of the day, 
CBS being far far below charmed and 
charming NBC. The very page \u>\>. 
secretaries, and executives at CBS 
might act on the side. Engineers left 
their dials, dashed to the mike for a 
few lines of dialogue. The CBS sound 
effects department, consisting of Harry 
Swann, also threw in 12 dialects for the 
one weekly paycheck. The original 
CBS program chief. Julius Seebach. 
would come to the office with a few 
sen hidings on the back of a card and 
with these for synopsis would dictate 
to a secretary a complete radio script, 
right off the top of his head. CBS was 
like that. 

A born innovator at the time was 
Charley Tazewell who shared the pro- 
gram department bull-pen with Char- 
ley Speer (now teamed with Lam 
Menkin in TV writing) Georgia Back- 
us. \ olanda Langworthy. and other 
worthies all of whom influenced the 
youthful Reis. When Tazewell's adap- 
tation of Poe's Telltale Heart was 
broadcast, remote from the Poe Cot- 
tage in the Bronx, Tazewell employed 
a magnified stethoscope effect to simu- 
late the hysterical beat of a human 
brain teetering on the brink of mad- 
ness. Reis was the excited engineer 
at the dials that night. 

In constant rebellion against stodgv 
radio brass. Tazewell hated to be told. 
"But you cant do that on the air!"' 
He defied official creed against extend- 
ed soliloquies and dames in tubs when 
lie opened DeMaupassant's The Neck- 
lace with a six-minute monologue by 
a girl taking a bath. Gnome-like lover 
of the fanciful that he was. Tazewell 
once took a terrible revenge upon a 
radio script editor who had declared, 
in that vague way typical of the spe- 
cies, that Tazewell's script wouldn't 
"play.*' Agreeing to do a rewrite. 
Tazewell had the manuscript retvped. 
altering the margin sizes, jazzing up 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



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61 



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I the punctuation, and adding other vis- 
ual changes. But absolutely no word 
cf the dialogue was touched. The 
script editor tumbled into the ignoim 
of pronouncing the "re-written" script 
50% improved, and just what he 
wanted ! 

In this atmosphere of make-do and 
horseplay, Reis became obsessed with 
program techniques and began batting 
out scripts on his own time. There 
would be those later who would say 
that Reis was just a glory-seeker and 
not a great mind or artist at all. Suf- 
fice here to remark that the things he 
hi ought to fruition others had only 
talked of doing. Out of envy came 
slur. Reis was too much the symbol 
of the other fellow's disappointed 
hopes when he stood there behind the 
plateglass window in his shirtsleeves 
and suspenders and by a crook of his 
forefinger commanded the muses. 
"Dilettante stuff." the green-eyed chaps 
scoffed. "Just an engineer who went to 
Europe and got bitten by the avant- 
garde.'' The unkindest cut of all was 
this — "taint commercial. 

Reis did indeed consider radio an 
art. His whole thesis, as he gradually 
formulated it and fed it. spoonful at 
a time, to his contemporaries amount- 
ed to an argument that like all great 
modern industries radio broadcasting 
ought to make regular financial pro- 
vision for "test laboratory" activity. 
It was. Reis contended, a condition of 
growth. This lab would deal in enter- 
tainment elements instead of chemical 
elements. ( Reis had once been a bac- 
teriologist's assistant.) 

One of his 1936 memoranda to man- 
agement reads interestingly today. He 
enumerated five objectives for the 
Workshop: 

1. To act as a proving ground for 
experiments in radio techniques in the 
hope of evolving new and better forms 
of radio presentation; 

2. To encourage new writers, ac- 
tors, artists to regard radio as a me- 
dium of expression; 

3. To acquaint the radio audience 
with radio's importance as a cultural 
force; to demonstrate radio's great 
contributions to allied arts and sci- 
ences; to illustrate, entertainingly, the 
complex technical and artistic organi- 
zation behind the scenes; to demon- 
strate radio's great importance in the 
held ol communication: 

4. To present outstanding plays and 
stories written for other media which 

lend themselves to radio treatment: 



5. To present, consistently, broad- 
casts which encourage listeners to im- 
prove and understand their radio re- 
ceivers. 

I This fifth objective is clearly his- 
toric in that it reflects a now-forgotten 
concern for static and reception. Back 
in 1936 radio executives were regular- 
ly given hearing tests. > 

Because of its 17-hour daily sched- 
ule of broadcasts, the radio industry 
always was hard up for new materi- 
als. The Broadway stage then pro- 
duced perhaps 100 plays a year. Hol- 
lywood with its stupendous facilities, 
and no sponsors to please, strained to 
turn out around 600 movies annually. 
But radio any day and every day had 
to rack up tens of thousands of pro- 
gram units. Sheer pressure of the im- 
mediate job of getting on and off the 
air on time denied most broadcasters 
any real chance to stand off and study 
their medium. They hardly dared use 
even an occasional fresh voice or a 
>oung writer. It was naive to think 
of a Workshop as possible when staffed 



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62 



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by the spare-time of technicians whose 
bread and butter lay elsewhere. 

Even the most devoted rooters for 
the Reis project couldn't quite manage 
a white lie after the inaugural pro- 
gram on 18 July, 1936. The favored 
euphemism was '"unfortunate." Im- 
memoriallv first broadcasts of new ra- 
dio series were apt to be "unfortunate" 
so young Mr. Reis neither made nor 
escaped history except that he was 
supposed to be "different." 

It was in two parts, that first Work- 
shop. In the first. A Comedy of Dan- 
ger by Richard Hughes, the actors 
stood in a chalked circle close to the 
microphone, reading from manuscript 
and under instruction to refrain from 
all gesture or movement. Then, in the 
following piece. The Finger of God by 
Percival Wilde, the opposite technique 
was illustrated: the actors had mem- 
orized their lines and were free to 
roam the studio, gesture, work their 
own props and so on. Undoubtedly 
this juxtapositioning of techniques 
was intended to prove something, but 
precisely what was unclear in the ex- 
treme. Young Mr. Reis was definite- 
ly pale after that first try. 

Results improved the following week 
with Broadway Evening, an adventure 
in street jabber, subway noises, fire 
engines, ambulance sirens, and Lindy 
repartee. Although it was often unin- 
telligible and confusing, Reis did get 
hold of some of the "mood" he was 
after. 

The series went along uncertainly 
but began to attract interest in the 
trade. Reis gained confidence, and 
newspaper clippings. He kept on 
nagging" Bill Lewis, finally got the 
use of the CBS house orchestra. In a 
little while now the excitement would 
have spread and young Mr. Reis would 
be directing young Mr. Orson Welles 
doing, quite as a matter of course. Mr. 
Shakespeare's Hamlet. 

At this period, Reis was invariably 
good for a lot of interviewing. CBS 
issued regular communiques about 
him. He wished to explore every angle 
c ( radio that then existed or might be 
uncovered tomorrow. "We don't really 
know yet what our microphones can 
i do," he said, "we're going to put them 
in queer places, add new inventions, 
give them their heads, as they say of 
horses, and see what happens. We want 
! to break every rule known to radio 
broadcasting." (sic) 

CBS described Reis as "on his toes 
with excitement." adding that "every- 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 




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63 



bodv connected with the Workshop 
goes around in thai peculiarly thrill- 
ing frame of mind that artists and sci- 
entists feel when they lliink themselves 
constantly on the border ol a new dis- 
eoven ." Reis had declared that hard- 
1\ one good radio script a year came 
in hut now one came in the mail from 
Milton Geiger, a Cleveland apothe- 
cary. Case History it was called and 
it was "the biggest sensation yet heard 
on the Workshop. 

There were "demonstrations" as 
well as entertainments. Reis intro- 
duced electrical fever machines, fog- 



eye, X-rays and so on. Terribly im- 
pressed. CBS proclaimed proudly. 
'"Ideas tumble out of this amazing 
young fellow. Originality simply siz- 
zles from him."' He was pictured at 
his desk where the plays of Moliere 
and Chekhov elbowed a bright new 
volume on "How To Write Radio 
Sketches.'" 

Reis made good his promise to take 
listeners behind scenes in radio itself. 
He had demonstrations of sound ef- 
fects, control engineering, orchestral 
instruments, how to get the most out 
of your radio set. Brad Barker's art 



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of animal mimickry was the subject 
matter one night. 

Very definitely the Workshop in 
1936 and 1937 was the bright young 
radio man's kind of show. Network 
officials awakened to aspects of their 
medium the\ had not suspected. Ad- 
vertisers had their eyes opened. Eng- 
lish professors were suddenly qui vive 
to radio as a new "art." Writers com- 
peted for the honor of selling the 
Workshop a script at a maximum price 
of $75. Above all the Workshop was 
a publicity man's dream, capable of 
repeated milkings for newspaper and 
magazine copy. 

Skeptics decried Reis in vain. Their 
sarcasm was wasted when the) in- 
quired when CBS had patented the 
board fade or the echo chamber. Nor 
did it register that Reis and his pals 
were accused of yanking radio's old 
background noises into the foreground 
and calling it new technique. Orson 
\\ clles. a \\ orkshop spirit, was to go 
on doing just this for years in the 
movies. 

Moot are the estimates as to the 
worth of some of the Workshop shows. 
Where inspired nonsense becomes 
merely silly is a matter of dispute. Not 
a few of the Workshops were Mad 
Hatter stuff, but without the genius of 
Lewis Carroll. Many were strained and 
self-conscious, a number of dubious 
taste. More than a few were out and 
out clambakes. There was a broadcast 
on which a man boxed with a kan- 
garoo. There was the night the Brit- 
ish radio director, Val Geilgud. broth- 
er of the famous actor, was to be hon- 
ored and Reis' alter ego. William N. 
Robson. flashed through the CBS halls 
in top hat. tails, and opera cloak, an 
awesome figure to the freshman Nor- 
man Corwin and perhaps impressive 
even to a radio director from London. 
There were hoaxes, too. on the Work- 
shop like the demonstration of nine 
kinds of silence, all identical, of 
course. Animals that talked were well 
represented first and last on the Work- 
shop. A beloved trained halibut in the 
famil) bathtub was one. From whimsy 
to flimsy to T. S. Eliot's Murder in the 
(.dihedral the \\ orkshop knew no pro- 
hibitions because of subject-matter or 
violent change of pace. 

Tranga Man. Fine Gali was the baf- 
lling — or was it? — title of a John Car- 
lile item which CBS quickly translated 
as Strong Man. Fine Girl. The broad- 
cast transported listeners in fancy to 
deepest Africa although there were 



64 



SPONSOR 



those who hinted that the talking and 
singing drums of the African jungle 
had come down by taxicab from a 
Harlem night club and were more 
Haitian than Congo. 

William Saroyan's specially-written- 
for-the-Workshop, Radio Play had no 
more orthodox continuity or logic than 
Saroyan usually provides. There was 
a murder by pop-gun, a variety of 
non sequilurs, some after-thoughts on 
love, a bit of opera, a bit of Jerry 
Colonna and for a finale Raymond 
Scott's newest musical goof. "In A 
Subway Far From Ireland." 

When you tuned in the Workshop. 
you never knew what your luck might 
be. You might tune out pronto as if 
hissed at by a snake. Or you might 
be captivated, lulled into a happy state 
ending with regret that nothing like 
the program you'd just heard would 
ever be repeated. But sometimes it 
v/as. Sometimes sponsored shows 
snatched up a Workshop idea, recog- 
nized a Workshop talent. 

For nearly a year and a half Irving 
Reis did pretty much what he liked, 
subject only to budget. Perhaps no- 
body in radio history ever for so long 
a time, as human rapture is reckoned, 
enjoyed comparable carle blanche. 
The budget did annoy him. Person- 
ages like Sir Cedric Hardwicke would 
accept engagements on the Workshop 
but contemptuously refuse to be paid. 
at Workshop fees, preferring instead 
to donate their talents. A future Broad- 
way playwright, Arthur Laurents, 
sold his first script, Now Playing To- 
morrow for a scandalous $30. 

The highwater mark of the early 
Workshop was Archibald MacLeish's 
Fall of the City in April of 1937 with 
Orson Welles and Burgess Meredith in 
the cast. This took place in a big New 
York armory and was almost spoiled 
when units of the military, strangely 
unaware of the plan, came plunging 
into the armory just before air time 
in big noisy, five-ton army tanks. 
This near-fluke apart, the event was a 
stupendous triumph. Time wrote that 
the drama "would not soon be forgot- 
ten" and thought "Poet MacLeish 
seems to have solved at one crack two 
long-troublesome theatrical problems: 
what to do about verse plays and what 
to do with radio." Reis was in top 
form. Time went on to speak of ra- 
dio as "science's gift to poetry and 
poetic drama" declaring that "in the 
hands of a master, a $10 receiving set 




Advertising is one of the few enterprises where the boss can 
walk into your office, find you reading a magazine, and not 
get apoplexy. But the working day isn't long enough, so you 
go home with a bundle — under your arm — and read maga- 
zines. Man, we're for you. and we'll reward you with some 
economy-size intelligence about our favorite topic. Iowa. 
The usual approach is to try to cajole your interest with 
frivolity, then smack you in the budget with an ineluctable 
fact. But here's a straight syllogism: 

1. Iowa is a get -out -the -superlatives -this -is -uptown -stuff 
kind of market ($2 billion annual agricultural income; retail 
sales up $115 million over 1949's record; cash farm income 
$4.50 to $5 per acre per month ; more cattle fed and sold than 
in any other state; $2 billion industrial income, with factories 
employing 50' /( more workers than in 1940). 

2. WMT reaches the Eastern Iowa market. ( We've got more 
analyses than you can shake a stick at which prove this.*) 

3. Your client can effectively reach same via WMT, where 
a one-minute Class A commercial (52-time rate) budgets at 
a mere $27. 

* So has the Katz Agency, which please see for stick shaking 
and dotted line talk. 



600 KC 



5000 WATTS 



DAY & NIGHT 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




12 FEBRUARY 1951 



65 




PULSE is pleased to an-j 
nounce thatin February! 
it will produce reports 
on radio listening out 
of the home in the fol- 
lowing markets . . . 

New York 

Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

Minneapolis 

Audience measure- 
ments shown in these 
reports may be com- 
bined with the meas- 
urements shown in the 
regular Pulse reports in 
these markets. I 



I 

For information about these 
and other Pulse reports . . . 

L' 

ASK THE PULSE 



THE PULSE Incorporated 

15 West 46th Street |j 
New York 19, N. Y. 



can become a living theatre, its loud- 
speaker a national proscenium."' 

Heady language this for a refugee 
from the 600 metre standby watch. 
Irving Reis was the first of the radio 
nobodies to have his name bandied by 
the intelligentsia, which ordinarily 
prided itself on total disdain of radio. 
Years later Carl Sandburg and Carl 
Van Doren would shower praise on 
Norman Corwin and Clifton Fadiman 
would say of him (Corwin) that he 
was radio's first and only literate. But 
for the nonce Irving Reis got plenty of 
nice things to paste in his scrapbook. 

In the end, CBS management began 
to look a trifle askance at the young 
engineer. He went so far as to propose 
the Workshop be freed from weekly 
schedule and broadcast only when the 
spirit moved him, or he felt he had 
something to say. He argued that 
since the Workshop broke the stereo- 
type of the program format, and had 
no format, it should in all consistency 
go on to break the stereotype of the 
weekly deadline, and have no weekly 
deadline. 

Reis was expecting a lot. But that 
was part of his peculiar genius. He 
never quite understood that he was 
colorful but not commercial, a pio- 
neer but not a property, and that this 
made a difference. When he insisted 
that the Workshop be accorded full 
equality in all matters with commer- 
cials he was, to put it politely, away 
ahead of his times. The stamp of ego- 
tism now was put on him. He was 
quoted as having said, "In the control 
room — I am God." In his control 
room he spoke true, but the CBS brass 
with other fish to fry was not above 
annoyance. There were cracks that he 
was a young Erich Von Stroheim with 
a stopwatch. 

In the end he took one of his film 
offers, joined up with Paramount, 
then wistfully looked on as other men 
carried on with the Workshop, in all 
some five and a half years. Of these 
Norman Corwin was to be the most 
celebrated. Meanwhile out in Holly- 
wood Reis had his memories and his 
scrapbooks and plenty of evidence that 
he had initiated a series of programs 
of unprecedented impact. He had fo- 
cussed attention upon the whole sub- 
ject of program-making much in the 
way, and at the same time, the famous 
J. Stirling Getchell had beamed the 
spotlight of restless curiosity upon the 
art of "ad-making." Reis like Getch- 
ell was clearly entitled to an honor- 



able plaque on the walls of sponsor- 
ship. * * * 
A second article on the Colum- 
bia Workshop will detail its fur- 
ther history and render an audit 
of net results, having in mind the 
potential usefulness of th? Work- 
shop story to television auspices. 



HEARING AIDS 

{Continued from page 27) 

many other industries. For hearing 
aid producers sell to what is essen- 
tially a hidden market. Most of those 
who need the instruments will not come 
to sales offices. The only way that 
prospects can be uncovered, usually, is 
through leads. The advertising tech- 
nique for obtaining leads is to offer a 
booklet on request. Once the lead is 
received, salesmen or "consultants," as 
they are called in the trade, often have 
to make a series of calls to overcome 
initial resistance. "Just talk a little 
louder, I'll be alright," the hard of 
hearing prefer to tell their families and 
go on without buying an instrument. 
Consultants must be well trained to fit 
the instruments to the particular needs 
of the purchaser, and they must make 



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follow-up visits to see to it that the aid 
is actually worn and not hidden away 
in bureau drawers. 

Only 700,000 of some 10,000,000, 
who could benefit from hearing aids 
own instruments. 

Thus radio is being pressed into ser- 
vice not only for the immediate objec- 
tive of uncovering leads but also as 
an educational force. Hearing-aid 
strategists are betting that radio, with 
its highly personal impact, can change 
outmoded prejudices against wearing 
the instruments. These advertisers have 
a strong selling story. Technical ad- 
vances have resulted in smaller instru- 
ments, which can be sold on the basis 
of their inconspicuousness. Millions 
are still not fully aware of this advan- 
tage. 

Beltone's decision to use radio for 
education and selling came as a result 
of good response to announcement 
campaigns in various parts of the 
country, plus research done by the 
Olian agency. The problem was find- 
ing the right program. Sincerity had 
to be the keynote of the show. The pro- 
gram had to have a great appeal 
among the older age groups. Beltone 
wanted to reach the hard of hearing, 
who listen to radio as well as their 



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friends and relatives. But the show to 
choose was a poser. 

One day Maurie Bronner, Beltone 
account executive at the Olian agency, 
was lunching with a friend connected 
with one of Gabriel Heatter's sponsors. 
"Heatter has an amazing following 
among the oldsters," the friend re- 
marked casually. That was enough for 
Bronner. Further investigation showed 
the potentialities of the veteran news 
commentator for the Beltone market. 
The idea was submitted to the client, 
who immediately saw the possibilities 
of such large-scale use of radio. Bel- 
tone added the Heatter show to the 
biggest ad budget in their history, 
$1,250,000, with minor trimming of 
spot radio activity. 

Beltone knew exactly how many 
leads the broadcast had to uncover to 
pay out. The number: 1,500 a broad- 
cast. The results: 46,000 bona fide 
leads in 13 weeks or an average of 
3,500 a broadcast. 

A Chicago distributor reports that 
23% of sales one month came as a di- 
rect result of the Heatter leads. Assess- 
ing all the returns, Beltone found 
"more leads of better quality than from 
any other medium." The sponsor be- 
came so enthused over the program 
that, beginning with the 3 January 
broadcast, the MBS coverage was ex- 
panded from 125 to 300 stations. This 
has meant lifting the radio share of the 
budget from 5% to about 45%. The 
present ad budget is about $1,500,000. 

To keep up with the flood of leads, 
Beltone found that its sales staff had 
to be expanded. In December, Heat- 
ter was pressed into service to help 
recruit experienced sales help in addi- 
tion to advertising the product. Radio 
was equally successful here. One in- 
surance agent in St. Petersburg, Fla.. 
who at one time had represented a 
competitor of Gabe's old sponsor Mu- 
tual Benefit of Omaha, decided there 
was truth to the old adage, "If you 
can't lick 'em, join 'em." Once he had 
decided to sell in the hearing-aid field, 
he asked to be on Gabe's side. 

At first, Beltone was getting leads 
from people who expected a panacea 
for their hearing problems. The copy 
was changed somewhat to give more 
description to the instrument itself. 
One distributor remarks, "The quality 
improved while there was not much of 
a drop in the total number of leads." 

Probably some of the feeling that 
this was no ordinary hearing aid was 
brought home by Heatter's approach. 



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67 





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the country compete in Nabisco's Milk 
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1950. 

And here's how K-NUZ did the job; 
Working with S. P. C. A., K-NUZ located 
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called "Portcity Popcert." With each 
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MILK BONE Dog Biscuit. Replies, 
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and in a few short weeks, the demand 
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Heatter, who usually speaks in the res- 
onant tones of an impassioned clergy- 
man, gives the commercials with all 
the eloquence that he devotes to the 
most important news. During one 
program he concluded a comment on 
peace possibilities by saying, "True 
enough we'll need a miracle, but if 
you don't believe in miracles, I don't 
know what you are waiting for in 
1951." Then with almost equal fervor, 
he began the commercial. "Well, I 
know aboul anothei neai miracle and 
I'm leaving ray news for it. A personal 
word please. If you're hard of hear- 
ing, 1951 can be a miracle year for 
you — thanks to a remarkable Beltone 
invention." 

Heatter's gift for being inspiring about 
the product he sells was illustrated at 
a closed-circuit meeting which Mutual 
held when the program was first 
launched. Distributors and salesmen 
came to the Mutual station in the in- 
dividual markets and heard talks over 
the closed circuit by Bob Schmid, Mu- 
tual vice president in charge of adver- 
tising, Ade Hult, Mutual vice president 
in charge of sales, Sam Posen, Bel- 
tone president, and then Heatter. 
"Gabe only spoke for a couple of min- 
utes about the product," one radio offi- 
cial recalls, "but at the end of the 
broadcast he made the salesmen feel 
they were mounted on white chargers 
in a great crusade." A product that 
has possibilities for aiding humanity 
brings out the best in Heatter. 

The Beltone message is getting 
across throughout the country. Olian, 
a great believer in research, found that 
the difference in leads between the 
TV markets and non-TV markets was 
practically negligible. Like most big 
advertisers, Beltone is not closing the 
door on TV. A few tests are now being 
made in several markets. 

Beltone's veteran competitor, Sono- 
tone, had been waiting for the right 
program for a number of years. Sono- 
lone had a brief experience with net- 
work radio in 1936 when a 15-minute 
musical show was sponsored on Tues- 
day afternoons on NBC (Red Net- 
work). Results were unimpressive and 
the show was dropped after a few 
months . A year and a half ago this 
advertiser tried announcements on the 
Yankee Network with an encouraging 
response. C. C. Agate, Sonotone's aff- 
able director of advertising and sales 
promotion says, "We have a feeling 
that radio will do a job for us now. 
If it does we will go ahead." The Galen 



Drake program, 15 minutes of home- 
spun philosophy, was selected as the 
best format for mention of hearing 
aids. Drake weaves the commercials 
into his commentary. I Lloyd, Chester 
and Dillingham, Inc., New York, is the 
agency.) 

A far different approach to radio is 
being used by Acousticon, a division 
of Dictograph Products, Inc. (Atherton 
Advertising Agency, Los Angeles, han- 
dles the account. I Acousticon will buy 
any format except swing and sports 
broadcasts (which have large numbers 
of young listeners). Otherwise their 
philosophy of selecting programs is the 
same as any other product. 

In its month-long saturation cam- 
paign, Acousticon is buying nine news 
programs, one special holiday feature, 
two Lanny Ross shows, one mystery 
show and one audience participation. 
Time bought comes to three hours and 
45 minutes per week. (The news em- 
phasis obviously grows out of the 
world situation.) 

Acousticon has had a spotty career 
in radio. Like Sonotone it tried net- 
work briefly in the past. A five-minute 
show was on Saturday evenings over 
\BC in the spring of 1943. Since then 



ABC 




WK*LO 



Louisville, K y . 

JOE EATON, MGR. 

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68 



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the pattern has been short-term buys 
on a spot basis. One exception is the 
Fulton Lewis .show, which Sonotone 
tried first on KHJ, Los Angeles; it 
pulled so well that it was extended 
throughout the Don Lee network. Last 
year Sonotone had a saturation cam- 
paign on WOR, New York. It was so 
successful, reports Alfred Atherton of 
the Atherton Agency, that his client 
was ready to try a similar campaign 
over the whole Mutual network this 
this year at a cost of about $65,000. 
This saturation campaign is actually 
an elaborate test. The sponsor may de- 
cide to continue this technique or an 
individual personality or program 
might be stressed. Different box num- 
bers for the various shows are being 
mentioned on the booklet offer so that 
the advertiser will know which shows 
are pulling best. 

How well advertising can pull for a 
product has no better illustration than 
the 10-year growth of Beltone. In 
1940, Sam Posen and his wife, Fay, 
started the hearing-aid company in a 
small one-room combination factory 
anil office in Chicago. The first adver- 
tising in 1941 was a series of small 
newspaper ads. By 1943 sales volume 
had become large enough to justify 



Miss Bernice McTagert 


J. Walter 


Thompson Co. 


Chicago, 


'Ilinois 




Dear Bernice: 






Jest wait'll yc 


u tell them Norge fel- 








lers 'bout this! 




5775 




Jest seen th' 






Hooper report 




jer Charleston, 








West Virginny 








jer November- 








December, 1950, 


Afi/'i'ltfi 


m 




an hit shows 




sA 


thet WCHS is 


(l/i'fmJ/T'f 


lurm 




definitely West 








1 irginny's Num- 








ber One Station ! 


QO?JE 






t v th' total time 


AVtflLi; 






periods rated, 


/GET i 


7 All 




WCHS had 43.2 


|yo u } 


w\\ 




percent uv th' 


moreI 






audience — 


iTHANt 






more'n two an' a 


l AL H 






halj times as 


lOTHCft 






much as th' next 


&003, 






rankiii station ! 


wfi 






Jest think how 
many folks is 




^ 


ahearin' them 
Norge 'nounce- 
ments, Bernice! 


Take hit 


) rum 


me! 


Yuh jest cain't 


make a I 


etter 


buy 


then WCHS! 
Yrs. 
Algy 




w 


c 


H S 


Char 


leston, W. Va. 



spending $10,000 on promotion. Since 
that period the ad budget has risen 
steadily until it hit $1,500,000 this 
year. Until last year most of the large 
ad appropriation went into black and 
white. Over-all advertising is under 
David Barnow dynamic sales manager, 
and Fay Posen. 

Advertising appropriations are not 
expected to be cut as a result of the 
war situation. Although hearing aids 
are made from scarce war materials, 
officials of the top companies point out 
that hearing aids were listed as essen- 
tial in the last war to provide the full- 
est utilization of manpower. 

This would mean that the industry 
would be able to continue the remark- 
able growth achieved in the last 15 
>ears. The introduction of the vacuum 
tube in 1936 enabled the manufactur- 
ers to make large advances in produc- 
ing small aids with greater effective- 
ness. Considerable education is still 
needed before hearing aids are ac- 
cepted as easily as eyeglasses. An in- 
dustry-wide $40,000 a year public re- 
lations campaign is one approach that 
is being used. But the most progres- 
sive thinking in this field is that radio 
promotion will prove to be the power- 
ful battering ram against the resistance 
to their aids. • * • 

MAGAZINES ON AIR 

{Continued from page 35) 

the camera so that viewers will recog- 
nize that particular issue on the stands. 
To provide a national atmosphere for 
some of the commercials, Tex is shown 
at the Times Square news stand for 
out of town papers. 

Another facet of the show that ties 
in neatly with periodical promotion 
are the interviews. Whenever possible 
the guest appearances are based on 
articles in the issue being plugged. For 
example, on one show Jinx spoke with 
two Marine photographers who had 
just flown back from Korea. An ar- 
ticle on their experiences was featured 
in the Post issue advertised on that 
program. 

The production schedule for this 
show is no breeze. Shooting is done 
three weeks in advance of air time. 
Page proofs are received from Phila- 
delphia on Tuesday mornings and put 
together by the BBDO art staff for 
the actual shooting the next day. The 
film is made in one day, eight hours, 
to save time and expense. The 35 mm. 
film is hurried through the laboratory 



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12 FEBRUARY 1951 



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Thursdays so that the rushes can be 
seen the following Monday for editing. 
The edited material then goes back 
to the laboratory and there is a 10-day 
wait for the final proofs. 

Curtis" other ma^s-selling periodical 
the Ladies Home Journal, with a 4- 
543,856 circulation, gets a healthy pro- 
motion boost from radio announce- 
ments in 150 markets. These are heard 
during the first week of the month on 
women's daytime shows or adjacent to 
soap operas. The elegant Holiday mag- 
azine also receives radio assistance, 
with campaigns in particular areas 
written about in the magazine. Twenty 
live announcements were used in Min- 
neapolis and St. Paul recently for an 
article on the Twin Cities by Norman 
Katkov in the January issue. 

Curtis activity in other media con- 
sists of large newspaper ads in key 
cities, small space ads in other key 
cities. 

Curtis' rival publishing empire, 
Time, Inc., is active for Life on TV 
with Kukla, Fran and Ollie on Thurs- 
days over NBC-TV, plus an extensive 
announcement schedule. This periodical 
leads all magazines in circulation with 
5,351,630. Life's move into program- 
ing, through Young & Rubicam, fol- 
lows a series of TV announcements that 
were started in four cities and then 
expanded to 27 markets at a cost of 
$10,000 weekly. Life's enthusiasm for 
video was expressed by William Gear, 
associate publisher who supervises pro- 
motion on the periodical, "We had an 
excellent teaser with these announce- 
ments since our product is fundamen- 
tally pictorial." Glimpses are shown of 
the best photos in the magazine with 
no attempt being made to tell the whole 
story. To offset the static effect of the 
stills, the camera is moved around the 
layout, providing some degree of 
action. 

While these announcements are high- 
lighting Life's news coverage, feature 
articles will be promoted on the Kukla. 
Fraud and Ollie show. Life finds itself 
in a tricky production schedule with 
this show since many cities see a kine- 
scope version one to four weeks after 
it has happened live. This means that 
special kinescope cut-ins must be pre- 
pared to make the advertising each 
Thursday night coincide with the issue 
on the newsstands the next day. 

Life's pictorial rival, Look (agency: 
McCann-Erickson), has a unique ar- 
rangement with the networks for its 
major use of radio. The magazine bin - 



time on the owned and operated sta- 
tions of NBC, ABC, and CBS. In turn,, 
these networks spend to equal amount 
in Look for advertising space to pro- 
mote network programs. In addition, 
announcements are carried on one of 
the Cowles stations. WCOP. Boston. The 
announcement frequency is four or five 
a day the first few days the magazines 
hit the stands in eight large cities. 

Cowles' dynamic promotion boss, 
Vice President S. O. Shapiro, does 
not believe in using announcements 
straight through the year. The basic 
pattern is to place announcements dur- 
ing weaker selling periods like the sum- 
mer. Announcements are not being 
carried this winter, best season in the 
year for newsstand sales. Look has al- 
so sponsored such special events as the 
Tennessee-Kentucky football game over 
WMGM and a half dozen cities in Tex- 
as through the Liberty facilities. Most 
of these broadcasts were used to plug 
sport features in Look. 

The magazine also receives mention 
over radio on ABC's Hannibal Cobb 
show which is based on the character 
from Look's photocrime feature. Look 
recently tried a series of TV announce- 
ments in two or three cities, but Sha- 
piro can give no verdict, since the re- 
turns have not been tabulated as vet. 
The picture magazine receives a 
healthy amount of publicity over radio 
and TV whenever the magazine does a 
piece on radio and TV personalities. 
These celebrities usually mention the 
issues in which they are described. The 
magazine garnered a good chunk of 
publicity with the award of the first 
Look TV awards in January. This was 
one of those arrangements that made 
everyone happy — the magazine, the 
networks, the stars, and Ford, sponsor 
of the program on which the awards 
were made. A different version of this 
promotion will be presentation of the 
Look film awards on the Bob Hope 
show February 27. 

Street and Smith Publications (agen- 
cy: Peck Advertising Agency), which 
appeals to more specialized groups, is- 
seeing "pleasing" results from its an- 
nouncement campaign, reports Arthur 
P. Lawler, Street and Smith vice presi- 
dent. Beginning last August, Charm 
was mentioned in 12 markets with a 
frequency of from four to five a day 
over a 10-day period each month. To 
interest female readers, a weathercast 
jingle advises them on clothes to wear 
for the day's weather conditions. An- 
nouncements are also used to push 



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well-known brands of merchandise! 

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of all the advertising done each 

year, that promises top quality and value 

— and makes good on its promises. 

More than that, you automatically 
benefit from a vast pre-selling job that 
has reached your own customers 
and convinced them before they enter 
your store. 

That's why you make your business 
stronger when you keep the force of 
famous brand names behind your 
selling. Let your customers know they 
can get from you the brands they 
know and want. Why be content — or 
expect them to be content — with 
anything less? 

The consumers of America are in favor 

of known brands — prefer them 

8 to 1 by actual survey. Darn good 

evidence that your turnover will 

be faster, your year-end profits higher — 

and that you'll collect handsomely 

on that free insurance! 

Give your customers what they ask for 

— it's bad business to substitute. 



INCORPORATED 

A non-profit educational foundation 

3 7 WEST 5 7 STREET, NEW YORK 19.N.Y. 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



71 






( 




Growth of retail sales 
% in the U. S. A* was in 

EL PASO 



6&}<)e&t 



audience in this vital mar- 
keting area is delivered by 




RODERICK BROADCASTING CORP. 
Dorrance D. Roderick Val Lawrence 

Pre s. Vice-Pres. 6 Gen. Mgr. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
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* AMONG THE NATION'S 73 LARGEST CITIES, IN 
THE LAST 10 YEARS (LtUil D.pk. of Comm.rc. R.port) 




m m % 



Same old story 
in Rochester . . 



WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent Hooper Leader since 
1943. Leads morning, afternoon 
and night! .... 



WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y.. 
5,000 WATTS 

Representatives ... 
EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago 
IEE K O'CONNELL CO., lo* A.igeles, San Francisco 



Mademoiselle and Living jor } oung 
Homemakers. Street & Smith allocates 
about $10,000 to $11,000 a month to 
radio. 

Dell Publishing Company (agency : 
Robert W. Orr ) has found that its 
radio announcements for Modern 
Screen and Modern Romances are an 
important influence on dealers. During 
the first part of 19S0. a maximum of 
10 cities were covered. This was cut 
down during the last six months to 
40 announcements a month in New 
York. 

Collier's (agency: Arthur Kudner J 
uses radio announcements in New- 
York, Chicago. San Francisco. De- 
troit, and Los Angeles. Frequency runs 
from four to seven a week. For a 
period. Collier's had announcements 
on Mutual'? Reporters' Roundup but 
this was dropped 1 February. 

Cosmopolitan (agency: Peck) used 
radio for three months at the end of 
1950. Eight announcements a day for 
five days nearest the issue in six mar- 
kets were bought. A similar schedule 
was used for Good Housekeeping. 

Liberty ( agency : Wm. Von Zehle & 
Company) used a different approach 
last December. The issue for that 
month featured an article "Will the 
Vatican Move to America?" An- 
nouncements were carried in the 15 
cities which had the largest number of 
known Catholic families. An average 
of a dozen announcements were used 
for the week prior to the date of issue. 
Liberty officials said that this invest- 
ment of several thousand dollars bad 
"fairly good" results. 

One periodical which frankly said 
it had not found radio effective is the 
Reader's Digest (agency BBDOl. The 
statement was based on results from 
small tests recently. This reaction con- 
trasts sharply with the other BBDO 
magazine client, Curtis, but the size of 
the investment is obviously to be con- 
sidered. Reader's Digest used only 
small sums for its test. 

Newsweek is employing an unusual 
technique, with the purchase of time 
over college stations operated by stu- 
dents at Amherst, Columbia, Dart- 
mouth. Harvard, University of Massa- 
chusetts. Princeton. Smith. Trinity, 
Wesleyan and Yale. The magazine 
supplies basic material for weekly 15- 
minute news shows. At this point News- 
week has no answers on the campaign's 
effectiveness. It was launched late in 
1949 when half of the college year was 
over and this year Newsweek is still in 



doubt. One advantage is the low cost: 
under $4,000 a year. And colleges 
have been a favorite hunting ground 
for subscribers. 

Publishers are also prominent on 
the air in three-way tie-ups between 
networks, sponsors, and the magazines 
themselves. Periodicals like True Story 
or True Detective supply material for 
network shows that usually carrv the 
magazine titles. When the network 
cannot interest sponsors, the magazine 
often helps defray the cost during the 
sustaining period. William Fineshriber, 
Mutual vice president in charge of pro- 
grams, who is preparing a half-hour 
Magazine Digest program, cites the ad- 
vantage to advertisers. "The sponsor 
gets the advantage of good story ma- 
terial, plus additional merchandising 
l>\ the periodical. Magazines publicize 
the show in their issues and plaster 
the sides of their delivery trucks Avith 
posters on the show." 

Some of the outstanding programs 
in this tie-in category are My True 
Story, sponsored by Sterling Drug 
across the board, 10-10:15 a.m. over 
ABC: True Detective, sponsored by 
Williamson Candy Company, Sundays 
5:30-6:00 p.m.. over Mutual. Both are 
Macfadden Publications. Dell is rep- 
resented by Modern Romances, across 
the board. 10:00-10:30 a.m.. over 
ABC: and Inside Detective, Fridavs 
9:30-10:00 p.m. over DTN. * * * 






MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

{Continued from page 61 

— get this — a local advertiser spon- 
sored the proceedings. That's getting 
the Goddess of Justice to pull up her 
skirts and pose for cheesecake. 

You'd suppose — and so did we — 
that this was all part of radio's rah-rah 
sophomore days. But no. It's been 
going on in the recent past in the St. 
Paul-Minneapolis branch of God's 
country. No sponsor this time, but the 
same old vaudeville show. This par- 
ticular judge was sitting on a murder 
trial with juicy sex angles. He not 
only okayed radio in the courtroom, 
but television, and a loud-speaker line 
out of the courtroom into the next-door 
movie. Yipe. 

Suffice that the judge was not re- 
elected and that a stern and under- 
standable reaction by the Bar Associa- 
tion has followed. There'll be no more 
of that. The moral seems to be that, 
as in gin rummy, people are constant- 



72 



SPONSOR 



ly picking up and playing from the 

discard. 

* * * 

Commercial television industry, as 
represented by the networks and ad- 
vertising agencies, will definitely wel- 
come stabilized conditions, meaning a 
basic minimum contract, covering writ- 
ers but will fight Authors League of 
America securing film jurisdiction. 
That becomes clear as webs and agen- 
cies meet one day a week, and every 
week, with the League. 

Meanwhile coaxial cable service to 
Hollywood is hardly more than 12 
months away with all the possibilities 
of change thereby implied. Remember 
that when the radio lines finally were 
reversible to the Coast, around 1932, 
it created a clear-cut revolution in pro- 
gram production centers. • * * 



THE BIG SHOW 

(Continued from page 31 1 

In trying to sell the Big Show and 
the other portions of Tandem. SPONSOR 
learned that NBC was quoting a cost- 
per-thousand of $1.44. This was calcu- 
lated on the 19 to 25 November week- 
ly cumulative Nielsen rating of 22.2, 
or assuming 2.3 listeners per set, 20,- 
780,000 total weekly listeners. Divid- 
ing this by $30,000 gave a weekly cost- 
per-thousand of $1.44. NBC compares 
this with an average nighttime pro- 
gram rating of 8.7 or 8,144,000 total 
listeners. Assuming a cost of $21,000 
for the 8.7 ratings indicates a cost-per- 
thousand of $2.58. In addition to the 
Operation Tandem portion of the Big 
Show (6:30-7:30 p.m.), NBC is also 
attempting to sell the 6-6:30 segment 
to a single sponsor. The talent cost is 
about $8,000. Up to the present time 
there were no takers. 

Two advertisers, RCA and White- 
hall, have used Tandem since the Big 
Show's inception. Chesterfield bought 
time from 3 to 22 December, then re- 
turned 4 February for another 13 
weeks. In addition to these regular cli- 
ents. Ford used Tandem as part of its 
saturation campaign from 26 Novem- 
ber to 18 December. Buick bought in 
for the week of 17 December. Out of 
pocket costs for NBC are now proba- 
bly running about $10,000 to $15,000 
weekly. 

Enthusiastic praise for the show 
came from one sponsor. "We love the 
Big Show," says Richard G. Reddig, 
Whitehall vice president in charge of 
advertising. "It has done a lot for 

12 FEBRUARY 1951 



• r-i«r»r» 



OLD FRIEND 



Consistently renewing its schedules 
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73 







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radio, a medium in which we have a 
big stake. The selection of Tallulah 
Bankhead was a stroke of genius." 
This urbane ad executive also likes the 
dispersion factor in Tandem which pro- 
vided five full network shows for his 
promotion. 

One advertising objection that has 
been raised against Tandem is that 
sponsors lose the advantages of listen- 
er loyalty to the program. Many ad- 
vertisers, SPONSOR found, believe that 
listeners who are enthusiastic about 
their favorite programs feel obligated 
to buy the products advertised on the 
show. Countering this objection, other 
sponsors say that it is the old question 
of announcement schedules vs. pro- 
grams. "There is no loyalty factor in 
announcements but they are still a 
mighty effective way to use radio," one 
ad man commented. 

On the production side, the Big 
Show's electric theatrical atmosphere is 
transmitted throughout the staff. "The 
Big Show concept," veteran radio pro- 
ducer Dee Englebach explains, "is to 
stay within the framework of variety 
comedy and still avoid all patterns or 
anything that can be called formalized 
radio." The crackling dialogue be- 
tween Tallu and her guests is prepared 
by an expensive battery of top-notch 
writers. Costing $4,000 a week, it in- 
cludes Fred Allen, who also appears on 
the program, Goodman Ace, George 
Foster, Mort Green, Fran Wilson, Sel- 
ma Diamond, plus special material 
bought from outside writers. 

Top credit is given to Miss Bank- 
head whose "legendary talent," Mr. En- 
glebach says, "ceases to be legendary 
on radio." The mild-spoken producer 
indicated to SPONSOR that he was fullv 
aware of the need to appeal to all 
groups of listeners. He is working to- 
wards this end in the selection of guest 
talent. For example, one show includ- 
ed Eddy Arnold, hillbilly singing star. 
"Another non-sophisticated touch is the 
hit song that Meredith Willson wrote 
for the show, "May the Good Lord 
Bless and Keep You." Willson, a 
shrewd, top-flight musician, leads a 47- 
piece orchestra and a 20-voice chorus 
on the Big Show when he is not play- 
ing a simple hayseed character. 

The cluster of big names on every 
broadcast, in addition to Willson and 
Tallu, are easily induced to partici- 
pate because of the huge publicity and 
promotion benefits. Then there's the 
hard cash, too. 

In arranging the order of appear- 



ance of stars during each program, En- 
glebach builds on a progression basis 
so that the show is at its peak at 7 p.m. 
to keep listeners from dialing CBS for 
Jack Benny. 

Despite the rating picture, Engle- 
bach's staff and other NBC depart- 
ments connected with the show are 
heartened by the enthusiasm of listen- 
ers that they encounter through such 
factors as the fan mail and the demand 
for tickets. This ticket demand often 
exceeds the supply of tickets even 
though the Center Theater with 2,500 
seats is used when the show is broad- 
cast from New York. (Occasional 
broadcasts are presented from Holly- 
wood.) One evidence of the demand 
for tickets was seen by the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford R. R. which 
announced a Big Show train. Tickets 
to the broadcast were made available 
to anyone who bought seats on that 
train. Three days after the announce- 
ment, the demand was so great that the 
10-car train carrying 1,200 people had 
to be supplemented by another train of 
eight cars. 




The feeling is 



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5000 
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74 



SPONSOR. 



Mail response now is at 100 fan let- 
ters a clay. One letter addressed to Tal- 
lulah, U. S. A., was promptly received 
at NBC. The star-studded extravagan- 
za (weekly talent cost: $30,000) built 
around unpredictable Tallulah Bank- 
head has made radio worth writing 
about again in the opinion of New- 
York columnists. Ben Gross of the 
New York Daily News finds it "radio's 
defiant challenge to TV in the form of 
a gargantuan divertissment." Jack 
Could, New York Times, said, "the 
premiere ought to go a long way to- 
wards telling the radio listener that 
somebody is thinking of him." Col- 
lier's echoed these sentiments in a full- 
treatment editorial. Since the show's 
debut, 5 November 1950, radio listen- 
ers who found that Sunday night TV 
programs monopolized the Monday 
conversation of TV set owners, could 
provide suitable competition. The 
show's bright dialogue was repeated 
endlessly. For the writing was a bold 
innovation in radio-sophisticated wit 
for adult mentalities. There were no 
verbal prattfalls or custard pies. 

Chief reason for the shouting was 
the volatile Tallulah, as attested by 
voluminous press notices and picture 






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spreads in Look and upcoming in Life. 
From her opening cue "presenting the 
glamorous and unpredictable Tallulah 
Bankhead" until the program's end 90 
minutes later, the Bankhead legend is 
brought to life as she plays herself. 
In a less happy light the words "glam- 
orous" and "unpredictable" applv to 
the program's over-all acceptance. 

The impact of the Big Show has al- 
ready helped NBC in such tangible 
ways as selling out the 5 to 6 p.m. 
hours to shows sponsored by Pepsi- 
Cola, Norwich Pharmacal, and TWA. 
It also helped hold U. S. Steel on 
NBC's Sunday night period. 

In balancing up the pro's and con's 
of the Big Show experience, there is 
no doubt that a real service to radio 
was achieved in attracting the atten- 
tion of the opinion-makers back to 
radio at a time when they were treat- 
ing radio as out of date as yesterday's 
news. Whether the show has a justi- 
fiably large appeal for so costly a pro- 
duction (the advertising revenue does 
not sustain it) cannot be determined 
until the upward trend has leveled off. 

Other important shows on radio 
such as Dr. Christian, the Aid rich 
Family and the Great Gilder sleeve took 
several months to two years before 
achieving a respectable rating. Regard- 
less of how much audience this pro- 
gram will eventually reach, NBC has 
taken a big step forward in rebuilding 
its radio prestige. * • * 



TALENT & SALES FORCE 

{Continued from page 37) 

Specifically, Berch's program of 
reaching the agents called for daily 
trips to district offices within a 50- 
mile radius of New York City, where 
his broadcast originates. He started on 
his daily travels immediately after Pru- 
dential bought his program about six 
years ago, after volunteering to un- 
dertake the job and gaining the ap- 
proval of George Potter. Prudential 
vice president in charge of advertising 
and sales executives, including Orville 
Best, James Rutherford, and Harold 
Stewart. 

Berch got up with the sun every 
week day, went by car or early com- 
muter train to the office scheduled for 
him by Prudential headquarters offi- 
cials in Newark, N. J. He limed him- 
self to arrive at the beginning of the 
morning sales meetings, held at 8:30. 
This is the kind of thins Berch said to 



cCi 
V 



19 



«u 



w 



$-< 




12 FEBRUARY 1951 



75 







Programmed 
for Negroes 
by Negroes, 
WMRY is effec- 
tively directing the 
buying habits of 



this vast, faithful audience. 



"THE SEPIA STATION 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

600 KC John E. Pearson, Nat'l Rep. 



THE ONE DIRECT APPROACH TO NEW 
ORLEANS' LARGEST MAJOR MARKET 



ask 

John Blur & Co. 

about the 

Havens & Martin 

STATIONS 

IX 

RICHMOND 

W M B (Jam 
WC0D-™ 

First Stations in Virginia 



the assembled agents when he was 
asked to speak: 

"Twenty years ago in Youngstown, 
Ohio, I was a coffee and tea salesman 
making the rounds door to door and 
earning my living a dollar at a time. 
That was back in depression days in a 
mill town, so I think you know what 
I was up against. And because I've 
been a salesman I think I have some 
idea of what your problems are. But 
I don't know the insurance business, 
which is why I'm here today. I want 
to learn how to do a better selling job 
over the air. I think you have to know 
what the problems are in a business in 
order to do a real job for it on radio. 
You know I'm doing the same kind of 
thing you are when you make your 
rounds, because every day I talk about 
Prudential to millions of housewives. 
I'm in their homes, day in, day out, 
even when you're not. Which brings 
up another point I'd like to make . . . 
The more loudspeakers you can help 
open up for me, the better chance I 
get to do the job of reminding the 
housewife about you and the com- 
pany." 

The next step each day was a trip 
along the debit of one of the men from 
the office. Berch did this to get the 
feel of his audience, and to hammer 
home the idea that he was out to learn 
the insurance game. 

At first, agents were reluctant to 
take Berch along. They were worried 
that having a "smart-aleck. fancy- 
pants"' radio entertainer come to the 
homes of low-income policy holders 
would arouse antagonism. 

"I remember one man," says Berch. 
"'who insisted on taking me to the top 
story of all the apartment houses with- 
out elevators. I guess he thought I'd 
quit after I'd walked up six flights a 
couple of times." 

But Berch. who often covers miles 
of ground during a day's hunting, 
wasn't discouraged by flights of stairs. 
He stuck with it and made the agents 
like him. if only because of the way 
he got the policy holders warmed up 
quickly. 

After each visit to the home of a 
policy holder. Berch sent an auto- 
graphed picture of himself to the 
agent, who then delivered it in person. 
He also followed up his contact with 
individual agents and office managers 
by correspondence and by inviting 
them to come down to New York and 
see lii> broadcast. (He keeps a com- 
plete file of names of men lies met.) 



During the first two years he was on 
the air for Prudential Berch visited 
approximately 125 offices in New York 
City proper, in New Jersey, and in 
Connecticut. He also traveled out to 
Chicago and Detroit where Prudential 
arranged mass meetings of men from 
offices in the area of those two cities 
so they could meet him and see his 
broadcast. 

Over the four years since then he 
has made repeat visits to many of the 
offices, in some cases coming back for 
a third time. He has continued corre- 
spondence with agents he's met and 
still gets an average of 30 letters a 
week from field-force men. Usually, 
when there's a convention or a meet- 
ing of Prudential sales executives in 
New York, Berch attends, renewing old 
acquaintances and making informal 
talks. He gets an opportunity to reach 
both the executive levels (at manageri- 
al meetings) and the salesmen (at con- 
ventions I . 

Wherever he goes, Berch spreads the 
word about radio and extends the invi- 



i \NGW0RiH 

SELL SOKW 




76 



SPONSOR 



Uition to come see his program in per- 
son; or to send a polity holder or 
prospect up to the studio. Every week, 
agents or policy holders from as far 
away as California make their way up 
to Studio 3-D in the RCA building and 
watch Berch in action. 

The show itself combines music by 
an outstanding trio, including an elec- 
tric guitar, an accordion, and an or- 
gan. Berch sings several easy-going 
numbers and does the commercials 
which are written in the low-pressure, 
down-to-earth mood of the show. 
(Agency: Calkins and Holden, Car- 
lock. McClinton and Smith. I 

Perhaps the most important ingredi- 
ent in the show formula is Berch's 
"heart-to-heart hookup." On each show 
he reads a letter from someone appeal- 
ing for help or expressing some uni- 
versally appealing sentiment. In these 
30-second interludes. Berch has devel- 
oped emotions powerful enough to set 
listeners writing in from coast-to-coast 
in batches by the millions. His mail 
has reached a six-million total, at 
times, in response to a single 30-second 
soliloquy. 

Berch developed the "heart-to-heart 
hookup" as a result of his experiences 
while out making rounds with the 
agents. Meeting his audience, the Pru- 
dential policy holders and prospective 
policy holders. Berch has his suspicions 
confirmed that Radio City's values are 
not necessarily those of Greenpoint. 
Brooklyn, or Hartford, Conn. He no- 
ticed that apartments still had old-fash- 
ioned "God bless our home" mottoes 
hung near the door. That's why he 
developed the feature which was to put 
his show, repeatedly, in the national 
publicity spotlight. 

The letters Berch pulls are an im- 
portant source of leads for Pruden- 
tial agents. This past December, for 
example, Berch got 64.182 letters 
which provided agents with an oppor- 
tunity to visit prospects. This is the 
way it works. 

Whenever a listener writes into 
Berch for a Prudential health booklet 
or a pamphlet on social security, the 
request is passed on to an agent who 
covers that area. This gives the agent 
a chance to get in the door under 
friendly auspices. 

Many agents and district managers 
have written in to thank Berch for his 
efforts. Here are several typical let- 
ters: 

"I am taking this opportunity to in- 
form you . . . about the wonderful ex- 



A 



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77 




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"The agents, too, have all got quite 
a thrill over distributing these attrac- 
tive pamphlets. . . ." District Manager. 

"You and your program were in- 
strumental in selling an industrial and 
intermediate policy for me this week. 

"Mr. and Mrs. - - of Sacra- 

mento, the people concerned, are very 
enthusiastic about the human and 
down-to-earth approach that you make, 
and state that referring other people 
to your program will sell more poli- 
cies for us. 

"Since I have been with the Pru- 
dential for only three months, I am 
especially grateful for your style of 
program." Agent. 

Berch, of course, is not alone among 
performers who have sold themselves 
effectively to salesmen. He is unique 
more for the persistency and thorough- 
ness with which he made his effort than 
for the originality of his approach. 

Ed Sullivan, for example, much- 
kidded, much-liked m.c. of the Mer- 
cury dealers' Toast of the Town (CBS- 
TV), makes a hobby of visiting Mer- 
cury dealer showrooms. Whenever he's 
out of New York on business, he ar- 
ranges to be in showrooms at towns 
along his way. Sometimes his visits 
are advertised in advance to bring ex- 
tra throngs of people into the show- 
rooms. He has traveled to several cit- 



ies for special promotions, including 
presentation of his show from Boston. 

Morton Dow|ney, Coca-Cola's own 
street singer, makes 30 to 35 trips 
around the country each year build- 
ing good will among local bottlers. He 
entertains men at the plants, provides 
entertainment for local civic events. 
Like Berch, Downey regards himself 
as part of the Coca-Cola organization 
and is certainly accepted as such by 
bottlers who know that Downey is on 
the board of directors of the Chicago 
Coca-Cola bottling company and owns 
a bottling plant in New Haven. 

Whatever the type of entertainer a 
sponsor has working for him on the 
air, whether he's a deadpan Irishman 
like m.c. Ed Sullivan, a dynamic Irish- 
man like Morton Downey, or a whis- 
tling and singing Midwestern farm boy 
like Jack Berch, he can get the benefits 
of intramural merchandising. All it 
takes is recognition by management 
that the job is important and a willing- 
ness by the star to be part of the sell- 
ing organization. Given these condi- 
tions, a company whose job is selling 
will find it a lot easier to weld sales 
and advertising into that all-important 
well-knit team. * * * 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 43) 

energetic both in carrying it out as 
far as it can at the moment, and in ex- 
ploring ways and means to broaden 
this service. 

Chris J. Witting 

General Manager 

Du Mont Television Network 

New York 




Have you seen my BEAUTIFUL 

Elliott-Haynes Vancouver Metropolitan-area ratings? 

50% ahead of any other — TOP DOC on the Coast! 



78 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Weaver 



Television broad- 
casters are ever 
aware of their re- 
sponsobility t o 
the public. Not 
only have pro- 
grams of an in- 
formational na- 
ture been seen 
w i t h consistent 
regularity on 
NBC television, 
but many art forms which heretofore 
had little ppular currency are now ap- 
I pearing in television. To take one ex- 
ample, look at the ballet whose incor- 
poration into most of the major tele- 
vision shows has brought it more wide- 
spread public attention than it ever re- 
ceived in its history. 

Television, too, by the simple proc- 
ess of bringing great public figures in- 
to the living rooms of our families, is 
performing a public service which was 
never before possible. During 1950, 
for instance, President Truman was 
seen on five separate occasions by 
more persons than had ever before seen 
all the presidents of the United States 
discuss great public issues. 

Next year, we at NBC will attempt 
Operation Frontal Lobes, another for- 
ward-looking series in the public in- 



IN DANVILLE, VA. 

BUY THE 

OLD ESTABLISHED 



ESTABLISHED 1930 



HIGHLY RATED 

46.0 HOOPER 

AVG. 5 PERIODS. WIN. 1950 

ABC STATION 



WBTM 



HOLLINGBERY 



Station WVOM, 5000 watt Boston 
Independent, seeks commercial 
manager and two salesmen imme- 
diately. These are top jobs for top 
men. Earnings unlimited. Apply 
1 Harvard Street, Brookline 46, 
Mass. All replies in confidence. 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



terest. With the cooperation of adver- 
tisers, we hope to program one hour a 
week of prime network evening time 
for this educational series. We ^vn ill 
place Operation Frontal Lobes in such 
time as to assure maximum viewing for 
education and information. Included 
in this series will be the best in music, 
ballet and a new form of reporting to 
bring the great issues of our day by 



lclr\ ision to the people. 

Thus we will integrate education and 
Information among our mass programs 
in such a way as to capture the atten- 
tion of the American audience. 

Sylvester L. Weaver 
Vice President — Television 
NBC 
New York 




available to sponsors 



Here are informational tools that SPONSOR feels can be of use to you. 
Requests for material must be made within 30 days. 



A 146 "An Extra Come-On For 
Your Customers," KTTV, Hollywood 
— explains some of the promotional ac- 
tivities of KTTV in a fold-out brochure. 

A 147 "A Market Study of North 
Vancouver City-District and Port 
Moody," CKNW, New Westminster, 
B. C. — describes early morning and late 
evening listening habits of the popula- 
tion of North Vancouver City. 

A148 "Television Dictionary,'''' 

American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, New York — includes TV defi- 
nitions in everyday language to help 
readers better understand terms used 
in describing TV and color TV in par- 
ticular. 

A 149 "Help Wanted," Free & Peters, 

Inc., New York — describes seven radio 
saleswomen and their programs. The 
16-page presentation lists the advertis- 
ers who have used them successfully. 

A150 "Guide to Layout and Re- 
production of Art for Television," 

KMTV, Omaha — is a four-page guide 
that lists "do's and dont's" in prepar- 
ing artwork on TV. 

A 1 5 1 "Report to Advertisers and 
Advertising Agencies," WOAI-TV, 

San Antonio — is a summary of answers 
received from a postcard questionnaire 
mailed to 5,080 television set owners 
in the San Antonio area. 



A 152 "The Pattern of Television 
Impact in Lexington, Kentucky, 
1950," University of Kentucky — is a 
38-page research survey on the impact 
of television in areas remote from TV 
transmitters. 

A153 "WNAX Fact File," Katz 
Agency, Inc., New York — contains all 
the principal basic information on the 
station: history, coverage, market facts, 
results, diary summary, mail response, 
talent, programs, etc. 
A154 "Primer for Time Buyers," 
CKLW, Windsor — contains information 
on coverage, spot announcements, and 
radio homes in markets covered by 
CKLW. 

A155 "Marketing in a Defense 
Economy," J. Walter Thompson Co., 
New York — gives interpretations and 
critical analyses pertaining to the na- 
tion's economy and the opportunities it 
holds for business. 

A156 "Why Are Listeners and Ad- 
vertisers so in Love ivith Radio?" 
Pacific Northwest Broadcasters, Spo- 
kane, Washington — is a descriptive and 
pictorial report on "the easy, quirk, 
productive way" to achieve results 
through radio. 

A157 "A Report on Lourenco Mar- 
ques Radio and Its Audience in 
South Africa," Pan American Broad- 
casting Co., New York — estimates lis- 
tenership that an advertiser may expect 
in 1951. 



SPONSOR 

510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



D A146 



To obtain any of the tools listed, place check in boxes r— ] A147 

to right. 

□ A148 

NAME □ A149 

company rj A150 

ADDRESS □ A151 

CITY & STATE 



□ A152 

□ A153 

□ A154 

□ A155 

□ A156 

□ A157 



79 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS^ 



They learned it works 

\\ e never cease being amazed at the 
speed with which the air media, radio 
and TV, are embraced by a whole field 
of industry once they click important- 
ly for one of its firms. 

The air rivalry between the big 
cigarette companies is well known. 
In the soap field, there's a perpetual 
three-cornered race between P&G. Col- 
gate, and Lever Brothers for the favor 
of the air audience. The food and drug 
fields also offer numerous examples. 

These radio/TV-minded companies 
I numbering among the top advertisers 
in the nation I have proven to their 
own satisfaction that the number-one 
way to tap America's pocketbook is via 
a radio or TV set. They've found air 
advertising compelling, productive. 

The latest field to move into the ra- 
dio orbit is a surprise. The hearing- 
aid firms are going for the aural me- 
dium in a big way. In case you're puz- 



zled, friends and relatives are found 
to influence hearing-aid prospects in a 
big way. In this issue (see page 26) 
the radio story of Beltone. Sonotone, 
and other hearing-aid manufacturers is 
revealed. Beltone started it; made such 
a dent on the market that the others 
waded in. 

Despite its successes for dominant 
firms, air advertising is still an un- 
known quantitv for numerous others. 
If you're one of them, you may be do- 
ing yourself a distinct disservice by 
failing to examine the medium closely. 
Can you afford that? 

Service opportunity for sponsors 

Can the public-service program sell 
goods? 

Goodyear, sponsor of Greatest Story 
Ever Told, says "yes." So does many 
another national and local advertiser 
who has invested in this "change of 
pace" sponsorship. The FCC stigma, 
which once seemed to adhere to the 
sponsored service broadcast, was re- 
moved a few years back. 

A large number of topnotch docu- 
mentaries, special interest talks, service 
dramatic presentations are available to 
the advertiser, network and spot, who's 
looking for them. 

Do you think you might attract a 
substantial, appreciative audience for 
? broadcast titled You can survive an 
atomic attack. Two days after Dr. 
Richard Gerstell. U. S. government 
consultant and author of the book by 
that title, talked on the subject over 
WIP, Philadelphia, the broadcast was 
repeated by popular request. Now the 



station is scheduling four more pro- 
grams — the first another talk by Dr. 
Gerstell: the second featuring Dr. Ger- 
stell in a question-asking panel; the 
third the reactions of a man who lived 
through the Stuttgart bombings and 
noted its effect on the German popula- 
tion; the fourth a meeting between Dr. 
Gerstell and the press. 

True, sponsorship of such a series 
I we don't know whether WIP would 
sell it I would require delicate commer- 
cial handling. But it can be done. 

Many an alert program-minded sta- 
tion or network has an intense-interest 
service feature on tap. 

How TV helps radio 

By now the flurry of fear that in 
1950 gripped the radio boys when they 
thought of TV has largely vanished. 
The radio medium is thriving; the con- 
cept that radio and television (two dis- 
tinct and separate media I can share 
the air as profitably as newspapers and 
magazines share the black-and-white 
realm is becoming standard. 

As a matter of fact, evidences of the 
way TV helps radio are coming to the 
fore. 

Item 1 : Life Begins at 80 started as 
a radio program, then was discontin- 
ued. Later it reemerged as a television 
show. We now hear that its TV popu- 
larity may soon bring it back to radio. 

Item 2: TV has made business men, 
both with national and local firms, air- 
minded. J. Walter Thompson spokes- 
man reports that number of Ford deal- 
ers, excited by advent of TV, now ex- 
press considerable interest in radio. 



Applause 



NAB's TV set-up 

TBA men who attended the NAB 
TV sessions in Chicago and Belleair, 
Florida are applauding the remarkable 
job done by such men as Harold 
Hough, WBAP and WBAP-TV; Rob- 
ert Swezey, WDSU and WDSU-TV; 
and Gene Thomas. WOR-TV, in bring- 
ing divergent elements together. 

Whether all elements of TBA will 
join in the NAB autonomous-TV set-up 
w.i- still in doubt as this was written, 
but the calibre ol NAB thinking and 
action was miuhlN impressive. 

industry spokesman are applauding 
the action of Judge Justin Miller, whose 
kes assignments for the foreseeable fu- 



ture will be on a high policy and gov- 
ernmental prestige basis, in requesting 
that he be made Chairman of the 
Board of the NAB to make room for 
a new NAB president-general man- 
aner. The Board of Directors unani- 
mously approved his action. 

An eight man committee (Allen 
Woodall. WDAK; Patt McDonald. 
WHHM; Harry Spence, KXRO; Wil- 
liam Quarton, WMT; William Fay. 
WHAM; James Shouse, Crosley Broad- 
casting Corp.; Robert Swezey. WDSU; 
i'lcn St rouse, WWDC) was appointed 
to select the new president-general 
manager following approval by NAB 
membership of change of by-laws that 
will allow Judge Miller's new office. 



The proposed new NAB setup will 
consist of not more than 14 members 
comprising the TV Board; not more 
than 25 on the radio Board — a total of 
41 with chairman and president. 

The current hesitancy of some TBA 
elements to enter the NAB realm is 
based on these factors; (1) the dues 
pattern is not yet set, (2) the extent 
ol autonomy is not yet set. TBA peo- 
ple point out that the plan is to have 
three members of the TV Board, three 
of the radio Board, plus the NAB pres- 
ident act in joint matters. The trouble 
is that they fear that the NAB presi- 
dent, who may favor the far more nu- 
merous radio stations, may swing the 
decision against them in case of tie. 



80 



SPONSOR 



THE KANSAS CITY MARKET 

Does /Yof Run in C/rc/es / 




Daytime half-millivolt contours shown in black. 

During the past year The KMBC-KFRM Team 
has substantially increased an already comfort- 
able lead audience-wise in the great rectangular 
Kansas City Primary Trade area. Proof lies in the 
result of a late 1950 survey made at the Kansas and 
Missouri State Fairs and at the American Royal. 

The KMBC-KFRM Team has built effective 



and The KMBC-KFRM Team Covers 

It More Effectively and Economically 

Than Ever Before! 



and economical coverage of the territory with- 
out waste circulation but more important, the 
building continues! 

Contact KMBC-KFRM, or any Free & Peters 
"Colonel" for full details on why The KMBC- 
KFRM Team is your best buy in the Heart of 
America. 




KMBC-KFR 



Team 



6TH OLDEST CBS AFFILIATE 



PROGRAMMED BY KMBC 



Mr. Plus joins th 
staff 





the difference is MUTUAL! 



On March 11th, WWDC and MUTUAL will join hands. WWDC's 
basic philosophy of block programming remains intact. To our 
present successful disc jockey salesmen, we add Mutual's high- 
rated kid and mystery strips. To our present twenty-four hour news 
coverage, we add Mutual's high-rated Heatter, Lewis, Edwards, 
and Henry. To our Washington Senator baseball coverage, we 
add the World Series and the All Star Game. 

WWDC is now third in overall ratings (Pulse, November-Decem- 
ber). With the Mutual programs fitting like a glove into our own 
program formula, we will get even higher ratings. So now it's 
more for your money on WWDC! 



WWDC 






WASHINGTON 
the big "plus" is now MUTUAL 

National representatives, FORJOE & CO. 



P.S. WWDC-FM's transit radio is doing a great job for an increasing number of national accounts. See H-R Representatives, II 



FBRUARY 1951 • 50c Per Copy $8.00 a Year 




Toda Top Commercials: 
tSB# si spot radio— p.23 

GENERAL 

Bill Ryan \ iiAB will hammer home this theme 



S? 10-4 9 122 20 
MISS FRANCES S P R A G U E 
J AT IONAL BROADCAST I N 

ROCKEFELLER PL A 
NEW Y03K 20 N Y 



mW.i 



4-f-SO 



n ~m 









f \N6^\Lb\ QUh+E^T 



t 







w a< 
Renew 




I r. Sponsor: 
. C. Sperry 
page 16 

Top Commer- 
cials: Spot 
Radio 

page 23 






J's 

23 Years 
on Air 

page 26 

Columbia 
Workshop 
Can Help TV 

page 28 

Can Sponsor 
Bear Rising 
TV Costs? 

page 30 

Case for 
Dept. Store 
Use of Radio 

page 33 



TV Results 

page 3 







Symbol of a way of life 



BF™| 


"-« 


»</1» 


III?/ -\t 




m* 


■ 




li iB 



In the rotunda of the Capitol Building in Richmond 
is Houdon's statue of General George Washington, 
labelled by historians the most important in the world. 
Symbol of courage, faith, devotion to the cause of freedom, 
this memorial (the only one for which Washington posed) 
is a fit present-day reminder 
that man's pursuit of freedom is eternal. 
Among the most powerful weapons of the American way of life 
is freedom of expression — 
well served by countless radio and television stations. Among these 
The First Stations of Virginia, WMBG-AM, WCOD-FM, WTVR-TV, 
are privileged to be numbered. 



1 i ! 1 

Houdon's Statue of Washington, 
in the Capitol Rotunda, Richmond 



WMBG 



AM 



WCOD 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by John Blair & Company 




WTYRv 



'O/v/s o* 




WOULD YOU DROP TOP-HATED SHOW?. — TV's cost dilemma pointed up by Berle show, 
Texaco' s consistently best-rated hour in TV. Texaco doesn't know whether it will 
renew come fall. Spiralling costs are only negative factor. Texaco fears pres- 
ent $65,000 nut may hit $100,000 by fall, is considering alternate-week sponsor- 
ship. (See story on TV costs, page 30.) 

NEW ROLE FOR RADIO: BOND SALESMAN — Bache & Company, one of oldest investment 
firms in country, has gone on air to reach 90% of public which does not now own 
securities. Firm believes radio can do effective job in broadening investment 
market. "Tex & Jinx" Sunday noon show on WNBC is vehicle; approach is to use offer 
of free booklet titled "It's Easy to Invest Through Bache. " Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 
Fenner & Beane uses similar strategy in announcements. 

THAT RICH FARM MARKET — Already-lush farm market is even better bet now. Tip-off 
for national advertisers considering use of farm radio is Department of Commerce 
monthly income breakdown. D. of C. finds farm cash receipts up 219 millions in 
December 1950 over same month, 1949; went from 2,473 millions to 2,692. Trend to 
consumer advertiser sponsorship of farm-service programs is accelerating. 

THAT BULOVA PROGRAM BUY — Recent Bulova purchase of first 30 minutes of Frank 
Sinatra show on CBS-TV, marks watch firm's first network programing effort. Mean- 
while, says firm's agency, Biow, budget for radio/TV announcements is up over last 
year. Move, agency maintains, does not mean Bulova is breaking long-standing 
policy of buying and holding time signal franchises. "Program is merely an extra 
promotion," says agency. But, at the same time, firm is getting programing know- 
how should strategy change in future. 

HAMILTON WATCH CONTINUES TRANSCRIBED SERIES— Ziv-produced transcriptions 
have been paying off for Hamilton Watch. With firm paying for production costs, 
13-week series of 15-minute "Dream Time" programs were aired locally on 417 sta- 
tions ; local jewelers bought time. Majority of sponsoring retailers reported 
that increased sales could be attributed directly to "Dream Time." In response 
to dealer demand Hamilton is making new series. Disks have open ends, middle 
commercial for Hamilton. 

EXPOSE DUE ON MAIL-ORDER RADIO/TV — At least one consumer magazine, pocket- 
sized Pageant, is readying expose on mail-order air advertising. Article will add 
fuel to fire currently being lit under mail-order by FCC investigation. Stations, 
meanwhile, are tightening regulations to eliminate fly-by-night operators. 

SPONSOR, Volume 5, No. 5, 26 February 1951. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publcatlons Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore. Md. Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



IL 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 26 February 1951 

SPON SORED NETW ORK RADIO SHOWS TOTAL 274— Radio-TV FACTuary reports February 
sponsored network radio programs totalled 214; TV total is 159. FACTuary Novem- 
ber report showed 207 radio, 162 TV programs sponsored. Total of 84 agencies 
handle all network radio billings in nation, with 81 agencies placing network TV 
programs. 

RADIO SET PRO D UCTIO N DO UBLE TV TOTAL IN ' SO— Continuing national strength of 
AM medium indicated by 1950 radio set production. RTMA reports 14,589,900 AM sets 
manufactured; TV total was 7,463,800. In 1949, totals were 11,400,000 radios, 
3,000,000 TV sets. 

CITIES SERVICE'S 25 YE ARS — With 19 February broadcast of "Bands of America" (NBC), 
Cities Service Oil Company started twenty-fifth year with same program; span is 
probably record for continuous sponsorship of network program. Oldest coast-to- 
coast sponsored program is "Voice of Firestone," on 23 years for rubber firm. 
(See Firestone story, page 26.) 

ARE MAJOR STUDIOS RELAXING TV BAN? — Paramount Pictures has given Mary Martin 
OK for appearance on special NBC-TV show to honor Richard Rodgers, 4 March. Star's 
TV debut may be indication that heretofore adamant major studios are relaxing 
bans against television appearances of contract talent whose agreements excluded 
video. 

WHAT'S TV'S PROGRAMING STAPLE? — Weed survey of February network TV programing 
finds variety favored program type with 39 sponsored segments ; comedy-drama 
runner-up with 36; children's programs, 35; quiz and audience participation, 17; 
music and songs, 15; informal at-home formats, 12; news, 11; talent hunts, 5; 
comedy, 4; Garden events, 4; forums, interviews, 3 ; boxing and roller derby, 2 each ; 
religious formats, 2; sports film, one. 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF VIEWERS PER TV SET IS 2.95— Trendex data for December 1960 



and January 1951 shows average number of evening viewers is 2.95 per set. Sunday 
evening has most viewers per set, 3.30; Monday evening, 2.75; Tuesday evening, 
2.82; Wednesday evening, 2.84; Thursday evening, 2.82; Friday evening, 2.93; Sat- 
urday evening, 3.29. Program with greatest number of viewers per set is "Your 
Show of Shows" (NBC-TV) with 3.96. 

NAB DIRECTORS ELECTION COMPLETED — Annual election of members of Board of Direc- 



tors from odd numbered districts and from at-large classifications drew 1424 bal- 
lots. New directors are: District 1 - Craig Lawrence, WCOP, Boston; District 
3 - Leonard Kapner, WCAE, Pittsburgh; District 5 - Thad Holt, WAPI, Birmingham; 
District 7 - Robert T. Mason, WMRN, Marion, 0. ; District 9 - Merrill Lindsay, WSOY, 
Decatur, 111. ; District 11 - H. W. Linder, KWLM, Willmar, Minn. ; District 13 - 
Kenyon Brown, KWFT, Wichita Falls; District 15 - Glenn Shaw, KLX, Oakland; District 
17 - H. Quenton Cox, KGW, Portland, Ore. ; Large Stations - John H. DeWitt, Jr., WSM, 
Nashville; Medium Stations - At press time Hugh B. Terry, KLZ, Denver, and John 
Esau, KTUL, Tulsa, were tied for medium stations directorship; Small Stations - 
Edgar Kobak, WTWA, Thomson, Ga. ; FM Stations - Ben Strouse, WWDC-FM, Washington, 
D. C. 



SPONSOR 



V ! 11 



No. 20 OF A SERIES 



xra* 




'BUCK IT WELLS 

In Bob-Sledding, 

WHEC 

In Rochester Radio 



10HC 7 /AI * 

am*** 1 * 1 




WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 



WHEC 
45.6 



B 

16.9 



STATION 

c 

8.3 



MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 

AFTERNOON 40.9 29.4 7.7 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 



STATION 

D 

9.2 

13.0 



STATION STATION 



E 

15.3 



F 

3.3 



5.9 2.4 



40.2 28.3 8.5 11.0 10.2 
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1950 

LATEST BEFORE CLOSING TIME 



Station 

Broad casts 

till Sunset 

Only 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 





N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, Son Francisco, 



26 FEBRUARY 1951 




DIGEST FOR 26 FEBRUARY 1951 



VOLUMES NUMBER 5 



ARTICLES 



Today's top commercials: spot ratlio 

Six outstanding commercials used in spot radio are highlighted in this 
first article of a series covering the best commercials on air today 



23 years iriili the same proyram 

Firestone, sponsor of radio's oldest coast-to-coast net show, remains alert 
to new trends, now has first successful musical simulcast 



The fabulous Columbia Workshop: part 11 

Manner in which it energized whole radio medium suggests how an industry- 
sponsored workshop could help TV develop fresh programing approaches 



Are risiny costs more than traffic van bear? 

Advertising men and broadcasters debate whether soaring TV costs 
threaten to price sponsors out of the medium 



The case for use of ratlio by department stores 

Day-by-day results at top stores are cited in this hard-hitting speech made 
during Pittsburgh newspaper strike 



COMING 



23 



2U 



28 



30 



33 



Today's top commercials: network radio 

This second article of the series describes and backgrounds a few of the 

most resultful commercials in network radio 12 iffOI*. 



How to solve the research dilemma 

From the welter of conflicting research information, sponsors hope stand- 
ardized measure may arise from Dr. Baker's special committee 



The Carnation Milk story 

How network radio (now supplemented by TV) developed Carnation Milk 
to a colossus in the food industry 



Beer ott the air 

A SPONSOR roundup bringing to light how brewers around the country 
are using the broadcast media to sell their brew 



J 2 Mar. 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: D. C. SPERRY 

P. S. 

510 MADISON 

TV RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUNDUP 

QUERIES 

TOOLS (BROCHURES) AVAILABLE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



6 
11 
16 
18 
20 
36 
38 
42 
74 
79 
80 




COVER: Bill Ryan, new BAB president, is man 
who will become increasingly familiar to spon- 
sors during 1951. Concentrating on radio 
alone, BAB will greatly expand promotional, 
service, research activities geared to help 
advertisers. 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editor: Erik H. Arctander 
Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Kay Brown (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast 
Manager), George Weiss (Southern Rep- 
resentative), John A. Kovchok (Production 
Manager), Edna Yergin, Douglas Graham 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Joseph- 
ine Villanti 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Pullshed biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave., New York 22, 
N Y. Telephone: MUrray llill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
360 N. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 6-1556. 
\v,si Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Offisc: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue. New York 22. N. Y. Copyright 1951, 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 







KG W THE ONLY STATION 
WHICH GIVES THE ADVERTISER 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 



in the ORBCO, 



exam 





'Planned" is the word which best typifies Longview, Washington. . 

st community in KGW's widespread coverage area, and one of the 
Laid out in 19.2.2 as a "model" town, Longview's indus- 



young 

most progressiv 



most progressive. Laid out in iyjj as a model town. Longview s indus- 
trial growth has followed a planned pattern. The two largest lumber mills 
in the world are located here, lumber products, pulp and paper products 
add to expanding payrolls. Longview, with its neighbor, Kelso, is an 
important Columbia River port. A recent KGW Tour-Test, conducted in 
cooperation with the Oregon State Motor Association, and witnessed by 
"Miss KGW" and Longview executives, proved KGW's COMPREHEN- 
SIVE COVERAGE of this healthy market. Include this "planned" city 
in your plans for getting the most out of KGW's Comprehensive Coverage. 




BROADCAST MEASUREMENT 
BUREAU SURVEYS PROVE 

KGW's LEADERSHIP 

Actual engineering tests have proved that KGW's efficient 
620 frequency provides a greater coverage area and 
reaches more radio families than any other Portland 
radio station regardless of power. BMB surveys bear 
out this fact. KGW is beamed to cover the population 
concentration of Oregon's Willamette Valley and South- 
western Washington. 

TOTAL BMB FAMILIES 
(From 1949 BMB Survey) 



DAYTIME 

KGW 350,030 

Station B 337.330 

Station C 295,470 

Station D 192,630 

NIGHTTIME 

KGW 367,370 

Station B 350,820 

Station C 307,970 

Station D 205.440 




is chart, compiled from offi- 
cial, half-milivolt contour maps 
filed with the FCC in Washing- 
ton. D.C.. or from field intensity 
surveys, tells the story of KG W s 
COMI'KtH KNSIVE COVER. 
ACiK of the fjvti.f growing mar- 



PORTLAND, OREGON 

ON THE EFFICIENT 620 FREQUENCY 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO, 



26 FEBRUARY 1951 



BETWEEN (3/y 
COMMERCIALS 



BY 

KAY 

MULVIHILL 



Newest addition to KPIX's 
afternoon program schedule 
is "Rumpus Room", starring 
Natalie and Monty Masters. 
The Masters, who have long 
been one of San Francisco's top net- 
work radio teams, and their six-year-old 
son, Topper, are actually building their 
own Rumpus Room in the KPIX studios. 

The hilarious events that take place 
as construction gets underway, have al- 
ready made "Rumpus Room" one of 
the Bay Area's most popular TV pro- 
grams. 

Hourly visits with the charming Mas- 
ter Family are aired on KPIX Tuesdays 
through Fridays at 5:30 PM. 



CONCERT SERIES 

KSFO's "Winter Concert Serif-." has 
been unanimously acclaimed as one of 
San Francisco radio's top musical pro- 
grams. Narrated by Bill Hillman, the 
two hour symphonic program has high- 
lighted the works of Mozart. Beethoven, 
Debussy and other-, outstanding in the 
musical world. 



ADD AIRINGS 

Faye Stewart has recently added a 
new link to her KSFO-KPIX airing 
schedule, with the introduction of "Mr. 
Cook" . . . screened on KPIX for the 
Pioneer Appliance Co. Each week, 
Faye plans and prepares meals for the 
audible, but invisible, "Mr. Cook" — 
the universal man — who delights in do- 
ing the cooking for himself . . . 

"Once Upon A Time", seen weekly 
on KPIX, has been cited by the Parent- 
Teachers Association as the outstand- 
ing children's program in the area. 
The 15 minute children's feature, in 
which classic fairy tales are dramatized, 
is narrated by Ruby Hunter. 




SAN FRANCISCO 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Sponsors and advertising agencies are surprisingly naive and un- 
forewarned on occasion about Negro, Italian, Irish. Mexican. Jewish, 
and other group sensitivity to "racial stereotyping" and this whole 
subject is worthy of more attention than, typically, it gets in the trade. 

True, the worst offenses are usually nipped in the bud by alert 
network "editors" (please don't call them censors) who are expert 
at anticipating gags, situations, and inferences likely to be resented. 
But in television, new facets of menace are present. Costume, make- 
up, or gesticulation are all capable of perpetuating stereotypes. In 
particular, the TV director is at war with the TV comic whose motto 
is "anything for a laugh." 



The key word in all this, "stereotype," was introduced into the 
vocabulary of communication about 1923 by none other than Walter 
Lippman of Harvard and the New York Herald-Tribune. As here 
used, it classifies a concept or assumption as to a given groups native 
"traits" and "behavior patterns." The stereotype freezes together a 
little truth and a lot of myth and by dint of constant popular usage 
and repetition establishes as snap observation of character what is, 
in more exact observation, one part plausibility, nine parts caricature. 

* * * 

It is never hard to understand the reaction. Nobody likes to be 
belittled by identification. Italian-extraction citizens protest bitterly 
again and again that radio gangsters always are given Italian names. 
Converted into personal, private, neighborhood impact, this hurts 
pride and prestige. Similarly, the Irish have a distaste for flannel- 
mouthed and corrupt cops named Moriarty. while educated Mexican- 
Americans tire, understandably, of nothing but ignorant, lazy, or 
thieving Mexicans in fiction. 

* * * 

The Negro, who gets more than his share of disparagement and 
condescension, has trained himself more and more to discriminate 
between trademarks, products and services which treat him with re- 
spect. The) tend to shun that whiskey where there is always a menial 
Negro in the picture. Recently a tire compam seeking Negro patron- 
age unthinkingly used in newspaper copy an old drawing of an out- 
landishly and ridiculously over-dressed Negro. The advertiser meant 
no offense, but offense was taken nonetheless for refined Negroes have 
been fighting ibis "stereotype" for generations. 

* * * 

In the instance of the tire company, the advertiser withdrew the 
copy, apologized to the readers of the Negro newspaper involved 
I Baltimore A fro- American) , but plainly a little foresighted aware- 
ness of "stereotyping would have prevented the whole embarrass- 
ment. That visual television is in like danger from thoughtlessness, 
i~ all too evident. 

i Please turn to page 16) 



SPONSOR 










Sell Ten for o Penny 
- and even less . . . 



I/UISU), 




Ut/iacUo in Kansas City 



Yes, at only 75 cents to $1 per thousand, Transit Radio in 
Kansas City delivers a guaranteed audience — based on 
audited count of bus and streetcar riders. They're on their 
way to buy — and you can "call your spots" by timing 
your messages to reach the most housewives or workers . . . 
men or women. No longer can Transit Radio be 
considered too new a medium to be included in any 
budget. Transit Radio and only Transit Radio gives you 
coverage of Greater Kansas City — without waste. 
// has been proved . . . and it offers new economy for limited 
budgets . . . new flexibility for special promotions . . . 
new opportunity for test campaigns. Contact KCMO-FM 
or our representative for detailed information on 
rates and time. 



KCMO 



Transit Radio tin 
SUCCESS STORY 

A new pocket-size magazine* was 
introduced solely by Transit Radio 
in Kansas City, on June 6, 1950. 
In only 9 weeks, sales were 24 
per cent higher than a rival 
publication, advertised in another 
medium during the preceding 6 
months. And though a bi-weekly, 
it outsold its weekly competition 
during the 9-week period. 
*Name on request 
Source: South -West News Company 



Kansas City 6, Missouri • 94.9 Megacycles 



Broadcasting 



Contact: H-R Representatives, Inc., New York, Chicago, San Francisco 
THE ONLY FM STATION NOW OPERATING IN GREATER KANSAS CITY 
26 FEBRUARY 1951 7 



$t @omfietitio*t 7<Mf6> 



^x"N 



CHARLESTON 




JLf you don't have tougher going in some markets than in 
others, we take off our hats to you. But if you do, we'd 
like to take off our coats, in any of the cities listed at the 
right. We know them "inside-out" . . . know how they 
differ and what they have in common. We can help you 
make Spot Radio work harder in any of these markets, can 
help make it produce more results. May we prove it? 



F 



P 



REE & Jr ETERS, INC. 

Pioneer Radio and Television Station Representatives 

Since 1932 

NEW YORK CHICAGO 

ATLANTA DETROIT FT. WORTH HOLLYWOOD SAN FRANCISCO 



i 



ULUTH 



EAST, SOUTHEAST 

WBZ-WBZA 

WGR 

WMCA 

KYW 

KDKA 

WFBL 



or FORT WORTH? 



Boston-Springfield 

Buffalo 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Syracuse 



NBC 

CBS 

IND. 

NBC 

NBC 

CBS 



i 



KFDM 

KRIS 

WBAP 

KXYZ 

KTSA 

MOUNTAIN AND WEST 

KOB 

KDSH 

KVOD 

KGMB-KHBC 

KEX 

KIRO 



Beaumont 
Corpus Christi 
Ft. Worth-Dallas 
Houston 
San Antonio 



Albuquerque 

Boise 

Denver 

Honolulu-Hilo 

Portland, Ore. 

Seattle 



ABC 
NBC 
NBC-ABC 
ABC 
CBS 



NBC 
CBS 
ABC 
CBS 
ABC 
CBS 



50,000 

5,000 

5,000 

50,000 

50,000 

5,000 



WCSC 


Charleston, S. C. 


CBS 


5,000 


WIS 


Columbia, S. C. 


NBC 


5,000 


WGH 


Norfolk 


ABC 


5,000 


WPTF 


Raleigh 


NBC 


50,000 


WDBJ 


Roanoke 


CBS 


5,000 


MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 








WHO 


Des Moines 


NBC 


50,000 


woe 


Davenport 


NBC 


5,000 


WDSM 


Duluth-Superior 


ABC 


5,000 


WDAY 


Fargo 


NBC 


5,000 


WOWO 


Fort Wayne 


NBC 


10,000 


KMBC-KFRM 


Kansas City 


CBS 


5,000 


WAVE 


Louisville 


NBC 


5,000 


WTCN 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 


ABC 


5,000 


KFAB 


Omaha 


CBS 


50,000 


WMBD 


Peoria 


CBS 


5,000 


KSD 


St. Louis 


NBC 


5,000 



5,000 
1,000 
50,000 
5,000 
5,000 



50,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

50,000 

50,000 






a Aw 









■■ 



Here are some of America's most successful salesmen. 

They sell scores of products to thousands of eager 
customers. They are invited guests into these customers' 
homes . . . invited because they are homemaking 
experts and entertainers. Their endorsement of 
the products they sell gives people confidence in 
buying. Their record of sales successes is impressive. 

Here are the salesmen who are setting sales records 
for delighted advertisers in the most vital markets of 
die land. They are leading spot television personalities 
who are iniiisiialK equipped lo sell vour producl loo. 
The) sell when people buy . . . b) day. 



O Kathi Norris .... WNBT New York 

Herbie Mintz. . . . WNBQ Chicago 

Chef Milani .... KNBH Hollywood 

Q Ernie Kovacs WPTZ Philadelphia 

Polly Huse .... WBZ-TV Boston 

© Mildred Funnel/. . WNBK Cleveland 

\ l ine\ Osgood. . WNBW Washington 

Bob Stone WRGB Schenectady- 
Albany— Troy 



NBC SPOT SALES 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



CLEVELAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOLLYWOOD 



10 



SPONSOR 



iVc*fr and r 




26 FEBRUARY 1951 



I. ]%etv on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



America for Christ Inc 
Campbell Soup Co 



Turner and Dyso 
Ward \S hcclock 



Chase National Bank c* Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson 

leading hanks in other 
eities 



Corn Produets Refining Co 

General Mills Ine 

National Distillers Prod- 
uets Corp 
Sales Builders Inc 

Time Inc 

Lnitetl States Shoe Corp 



& Mather 

C. L. Miller 

Tatham-Laird 

lli. mi: & Cooper 

Ted Factor 

Young & Bubieam 

Stockton. West. Burk- 
hart 



ABC -TV 

NBC-TV 36 

ABC-TV 7 

CBS-TV 

ABC-TV 33 

DuMont 3 

NBC -TV 37 

NBC-TV 39 

NBC-TV 62 



11-11 :30 pm: 5 Mar; 



The Circuit Rider; M 
52 wks 

Henrv Morgan Show; I 9.9:3(1 pm : 2h Jan: 

19 wks 

.March of Time Through the ^ciir-: I 10-10:30 

pm; 23 Feb; 26 wk> (Chase ..n WJZ-TV) 

Garry Moore Show; I h 1:45-2 pin; 1 Mar: 
52 wks 

Ted Mack's Family Hour; alt Sun 6:30-7 pin ; 

25 Mar; 52 «k- 
Famous Jurv Trials; NX 9-9:30 pm; 3 1 Jan; 

52 wks 

Sheila Graham Show; Sat 11-11:13 pin: 2(1 

Jan: 52 »k- 
Kukla. Fran & Ollie; 111 7-7:30 pm; 8 Feb; 

52 wks 
Richard Rodgers Tribute: Sun 9-1(1 pm : 1 Mar 

only 



2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Cigarette & 

Cigar Co 
Congo! eum-Nairn Inc 

Electric Auto-Lite Co 
General Motors Corp 

Standard Brands Inc 



SSC&B 


NBC-TV 


35 


MeCaiin-Eriekson 


NBC-TV 


54 


Cecil & Presbrev 


CBS-TV 




D. P. Brother 


CBS-TV 




Ted Bates 


NBC-TV 


24 



Big Story: F 9:30-10 pm; 9 Mar: 52 wks 

Garrowav at Large; Sun 10-10:30 pm: 18 Feb 
52 wks 

Suspense; T 9:30-10 pm ; 27 Feb: 52 «k- 
Doug Edwards and the News; F 7:45-8 put 

23 Feb; 52 wks 
NBC Comics; Th 5-5:15 pm; 8 Feb: 13 wks 



3. Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



KMMJ. Grand Island. 
WAIID, Auburn, Ala. 
WDEM. Providence 
WELS, Kinston, N. C. 
■vST.PO, La Salle, 111. 
WSIR, Winter Haven, 
WTSP, St. Petersburg 



ABC 

Independent 

Independent 

MBS 

Independent 

MBS 

MBS 



N.Y. 



N.Y. 



H-B Representatives. 
Devney & Co, N.Y. 
National Time Sales. 
Devney & Co. N.Y. 
National Time Sales. N. Y. 
Devney & Co, N.Y. 
Ra-Tel Representatives. N.Y. 



(eff 1 May) 



4. New and Renewed Spot Television 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Beech-Nut Packing Co 
Beech-Nut Packing Co 
Beech-Nut Packing Co 
D. L. Clark Co 
Continental Baking Co 
Dow-Corning Corp 



Kenyon & 
Kenyon & 
Kenyon & 
BBDO 
Ted Bates 
Don Wagnitz 



Eekhardt 
Eckhardt 
Eekhardt 



WNBK, Cleve. 
WNBQ, Chi. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WPTZ, Phila. 
WBZ-TV. Boston 
WCBS-TV. N.Y. 



8-see anncmt ; 3 Feb; 52 wks (r) 
8-see film; 5 Feb; 52 wks (r) 
Stn break: 6 Feb; 52 wks <r) 
1-min film: 29 Jan; 13 wks (r) 
1-miii. 20-see film; 29 Jan; 52 wks 
1-min and 20-sec anncmt: 52 wks (, 



(n) 
i) 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, New National Spot Radio Business, National 
Broadcast Sales Executive Changes, Sponsor Personnel Changes, New Agency Appointments 





Numbers afte- names- 
refer to category of' 
listing on t!iis page 

C. Nelson Baker (5) 
Ernest J. Conway (5) 
Remus A. Harris (5) 
H. L Holcomb (5) 
Earl Kennedy (5) 



New and renew 26 February 1951 



4. New and Renewed Spot Television (continued) 






Numbers after names 
refer to category of 
listing "ii this page 

David Loomis (5) 
Rudyard McKee (5) 
William C. Panlt (5) 
M. A. Raymond (5) 
Alfred Whittaker (5) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Duffy. Mott Co Inc 


>i.im. & Kiihieam 


Emerson Dm*: Co 


BBDO 


I K.-ar Tire & Rubber 

Co 


Compton 


Great Atlantic & Pacific 
Tea Co 


Paris .<C Peart 


Hathaway Mfg Co 


Ibbotl Kimball 


Hnber Raking Co 


Quality Bakers of 




America 


Leader Novelty Candy Co 


Mann-Ellis 


I, ever Brothers 


N. W. Ayer 


Lever Brothers 


N. W. Ayer 


O-Cel-O Inc 


Comstoek Duffes 


Philip Morris & Co 


Blow 


J. L. Preseott Co 


Monroe 1*. Dreher 


Adam Seheidt Brewing Co 


Ward Wheeloek 


Stroehmann Brothers Co 


(Quality Bakers of 




America 


Sundial Shoe Co 


Hoag & Provandie 


Time Ine 


Young & Kiihieam 


Vita Food Produets Ine 


Ben Saekheim 



WNBQ. Chi. 
KTSL, Hlwyd. 
WPTZ. Phila. 

WNBT, N.Y. 

WCAU-TV, Phila. 
WPTZ. Phila. 

WAFM-TV, Birm. 
WNBK, Cleve. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WPTZ. Phila. 
WNBT. N.Y. 
WCAU-TV, Phila. 
WNBW. Wash. 
WPTZ. Phila. 

WCAU-TV, Phila. 
KSL-TV, Salt Lake 
WNBT, N.Y. 



Stn hrcak; 30 Jan: 31 wka 4r) 

20-sec annrml ; 52 wks (r) 

Stn break; 23 Feb; 52 wks <r) 

1-min him; 31 Jan: 13 wks (r) 

1-in in anm-mt : '' wks ( n ) 

I -mill film: 6 Feb; 26 wks (r) 

30-min prog ; 24 Feb ; 4 wks (n) 
Sin break; 6 Feb; 47 wks (n) 
Stn break; 20 Feb; 45 wks (n> 
I -inin Him; 16 Feb; 13 wks (r) 
20-sec film; 27 Jan; 52 wks (n) 
1-min partie; 8 Mar; 27 wks (n> 
Stn break ; 31 Jan; 52 wks (n) 
I -inin film: 5 Feb; 13 wks (n> 

1 -min partie : 5 Mar; 13 wks (n) 
20-sec annrml; 52 wks (n) 
Partie.; 31 Jan; 13 wks (r) 



5. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



C. Nelson Baker 
Vera Brennan 
William K. Brooks 
\ndrew D. Carpenter 
Frnesl J. Conway 
Harry Dang erfi eld Jr 
Willard Davis 
Hubert R. Doering 
Bernard J. Gross 
Thomas W. Hall 
Remus A. Harris 
Geo rye C. Heaslip 
James R. Heekim Jr 
J. G. Hitree 
II. Lawrence Holcomh 
Itohert E. Jaekson 
Farl Kennedy 
Mannie R. Klein 
Belly Laneaster 

David Loomis 
Rutlyard C. MeKee 
L. J. Marshall 
Walson B. Metealfe 
Dusty Miller 
William C. Pank 

Kenneth S. Pratt 
Bill Preseott 
Michael A. Raymond 
Richard K. Richman 
Trudy Riehmond 
John C. Robh 
Lew is Russell 

Allan Thomas 

David P. Thomas 
Irwin W. Tyson 
Franklin C. Wheeler 
Alfred A. Whittaker 
L. J. Wicgand 

Clifford II. Wolfe 



WFBR. Balto.. talent 

Duarn- Jones, N.Y., head radio timebuyer 

Rogers & Smith, K. C, Mo., copywriter 

Dan B. Miner Co, L. A., acct exee 

Boron Chemical Corp. N.Y., pres 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. Piltbs. 

KTLA-TV, L. A. 

Gardner, St. L., acct exec 

Weiss & Geller, Chi., acct exec 

O. S. Tyson & Co, N. Y.. acct mgr 

Paris & Peart, N.Y., acct exec 

Prentice-Hall, N.Y. 

Haehnle, Cine, exec vp 

Morse International, N.Y. 

Lennen & Mitchell, N.Y., assl to radio, Iv vp 

Kaufman & Assoc, Chi., vp 

Young & Rubicam, N.Y., wriler-dir 

Deane-Klcin-Davidson Co. Phila., owner 

MacWilkins, Cole & Weber. P«>rlland. Ore.. 

exec 
Dancer-Filzgerald-S ample. N.Y., acct exec 
McCann-Eriekson, N.Y., acct exec 
Russel M. Seeds Co, Chi., copywriter 
Kireher, Helton & Colletl, Dayton, acct exee 
Grey, N.Y., copywriter 
Roy S. Dursline, N.Y.. acci exee 



R mi In it. ill *Xr Ryan, Detroit, acet exec 

Ball & Davidson, Denver, ant exec 

Lennen & Mitchell, N.Y.. acet exec 

Lew Kashuk & Son, N.Y., |v, publ dir 

ABC, N.Y. 

Adv, sis management 

Culligun Zeolite Co, North brook. 



111.. 
1^ Point. 



ad,. 

Wiv.. 



It mi I ■ r mil «K Ryan. Balto.. dir radio, tv dept 

Same, dir radio, tv timebuying 

Same, asst copy dir 

Same, member board of dir 

Compton, N.Y., acct exec 

Bond & Starr, Pitlsb.. ip 

Harry W. Morris. S. F.. acct exec 

McCann-Eriekson. Detroit, acct exec 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N.Y., acct exec 

Cecil »S Presbrey. N.lr .. exee 

Farson, Huff & Northlich. Cine, acct exec 

Irwin Vladimir, N.Y,, acct exec 

Tatham-Laird, N.Y., radio, tv dept dir 

Same, gen mgr 

Maxon, N.Y.. head radio, tv prod 

Goldsmith, Providence, exec 

Alport & O'Rourke, Portland. Ore., vp 

Same, vp 

Same, assl to pres 

Same, copy chief 

Same, vp 

G ib r altar, N.Y.. iv copy head 

Calkins & Holden. Carlock. McClinton & Smith, 

N.Y., acct exec 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 

Dowd, If. .11.. I.I & Johnstone, N.Y., vp dir 
Moselle & Eisen, N.Y., publ dir 
William Wilbur. N.Y.. vp 

Walter McCreery, Beverly Hills, ace! exec 
Fuller & Smith & Ross, Cleve.. acct exec 



sis pro 
Richard H. Brady Co. St 

art dir 
N.Y. Times, N.Y., prom dept 
O. S. Tyson & Co, N.Y., treas, vp 
Brisacher, Wheeler ci Staff, S.F., exec vp 
Benton & Bowles, N.Y.. aSSl to research vp 

Cincinnati Industries Cine, adv, si- prom 

mgr 
Dan« cr-F it zgern Id-Sam pie, N.Y., acet exec 



Same, vp 

Kal, Ehrlich and Merrick. 

Same, exec vp 

Same, pres 

Same, research dir 

Cucnther, Brown *\ Berne 

Same. \p 



i'a-h.. dir 



acet exec 



St a T<^tVHO 



SUGGESTS 



A SIGNIFICANT NEW APPROACH TO TIME-BUYING 



7^ rive-'Poiftt System 



\_J ntil fairly recently, most time-buyers assumed that everything 
else being equal, the "listener-preference" accorded any station 
could reasonably be judged by determining that station's "Enter- 
tainment Popularity." 

Today local programs in five other categories usually determine 
station preference. News is the largest audience-builder most 
stations possess. Sports often rank second, with various local 
Specific Farm Programs, Educational and Public Interest features 
high on the list. Thus these Five Points of local programming 
today offer a highly important criterion of station evalua- 
tion. . . . 

During the next few months, these WHO pages will describe 
and prove WHO's outstanding achievements in each of these 
five programming departments — which, in turn, help explain 
WHO's foremost position as a public facility and as an adver- 
tising medium. We suggest that you tear out and file these 
pages. They will offer significant contributions to your time- 
buying procedures. 

WIHI© 

+for Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Walts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 




26 FEBRUARY 1951 



13 



msw 



yjm 



"Joined AP in 1949. Happy to report excellent results." 



TODD STORZ, 
General Manager, 
KOWH, 
Omaha, Neb. 



"As an old AP member, we're proud to carry 69 sponsored 
Associated Press newscasts weekly." 



ALLEN M. WOODALL, 

President, 

WDAK, 

Columbus, Ga. 



AP members share in AP's tradition of service to the nation — a tradition of profit to sponsors /tTIII ^ ._..., 
and member broadcasters. Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride ... / H #0 O In I l(//l 






I 



J 




T ODD STOrz 




/ 1 S 

AUEN M. WOODALl 



Prom General aa 
of KOV/H: Ma "°9er Storz 

"We have had 
menfs < the m J '^ C °'"P//- 

"5/nce /COVVH A . 
Associated Pres , 6e f°'"e on 

n7e '" «i our new 11 1 ' m P'ove- 

n'9ht.t ime ZTeZ AP ' S900d 

"leasts that I 9& 9 ' ves « 

*• Minute f ° Z B m ° re "P-fo. 

7:55 AM." Ur P r °9ra ms at 



wfi* PreS ' denf VVoodal, of 

-Proof that APnT° ° T years 
*'*h listeners «, J? «f, " P ° pular 
*°rs. Neh Y r ° m ° ble f °r span- 

^^KfttheZjh neWed »'« h 
">e ninth year " 

%"*"***.*„*„* 

local c„„ c °'P°'c,tion. Ow 

C '°*n botfleTat" \ R0ya > 

"°- ^ rnainta ZTrcV?- 
« best by / oc/o , / °" . RC C ola 

^isCv b ;tL: n V hatAp 

"Y "stener-test." 



EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. 



AP newscasts command the 

confidence of 

—listeners 

—sponsor'. 

Current events are urgent, 

vital, of great personal 

interest to everyone. 

That's why listeners rely on 

The Associated Press, largest 

of the news agencies, for 

fast, accurate, objective 

news reporting. 

Sponsors know that 

wholehearted audience 

acceptance of their 

news programs means 

greater acceptance of 

their product — 

more sales completed. 

To Member Broadcasters, 

AP newscasts mean 

more program sales, more 

contract renewals and an AP 

charge based only on the 

cost of providing service. 




■»#! 



Associated Press 

resources and facilities 

include: 

A news report of 

1,000,000 words every 

24 hours. 

A staff of 7200 

augmented by 

staffs of member 

stations and newspapers 

—more than 100,000 men 

and women contributing to 

each day's report. 

Leased news wires of 
350,000 miles in the U. S. alone. 

The only state-by-state news 
circuits in existence. 

100 news bureaus in the U. S. — 

offices and news 

men around the world. 

A complete, nationwide 

election service, employing 

65,000 special workers. 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, WRITE 

RADIO DIVISION 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

50 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 



The 

only 

CBS 

affiliated 

station 

serving 

one of the 

Nation's 

Wealthiest 

Farm 

Markets . . . 



WGTM 



5,000 Watts— Wilson, N. C. 

is the 

Accepted 

Station . . . 

the 

Preferred 

station . . . 

the station with 

SELL 

right in the middle 

of the 

World's 

Biggest 

Tobacco producing 

area . . . 

WRITE ALLEN WANNAMAKER 

General Manager, WGTM 
WILSON, N. C. 

for your copy of the New 
"TIME BUYERS Market 
and Coverage Data" folder. 




He Si 



D. Clements Sperry 

Advertising director 
Oklahoma Tire & Supply Company, Tulsa 



Radio advertising is nothing new to D. Clements Sperry, adver- 
tising director of the Oklahoma Tire & Supply Company in Tulsa. 

It's no coincidence that he has been directing the company's adver 
tising for the same 18 years during which the company's prime me- 
dium has become radio. His first use of radio in 1932 resulted in a 
whopping demand for a free premium offer. Since then, he has used 
the medium to sell merchandise, not to give something away. 

Beginning with a $600 test run of one-minute Sunday announce- 
ments in 1932 over KVOO. Tulsa. Sperry now spends more than 
$100,000 a year on 43 stations in the company's four-state operating 
area. In the intervening 18 years, the firm has grown from 12 small 
stores to a chain of 200 covering Oklahoma. Arkansas, Kansas, and 
Missouri. 

"We proceeded cautiously at first, using only announcement sched- 
ules.' said the 54-year-old advertising manager. "Later we went into 
programing, buying first a 30-minute Sunday variety show, and after 
that, a 15-minute Monday through Friday musical program strip 
during the noon hour period." After using programs for about two 
years, Sperry decided to try a newscast; he has been using them 
for 15 years since. 

Top consideration is given to daytime news schedules on selected 
stations. Sperry uses a rotating news policy which gives him the 
chance to reach four different segments of the listening audience 
within a four-day period over a single station. 

Having had a journalism background, Sperry joined the companj 
in 1932. He was born in Springfield, Mo., in 1896, later attended the 
University of Missouri for his journalism education. He served as a 
second lieutenant in the engineer corps during World War I, with 
19 months of overseas duty. Afterwards, he spent three years in 
newspaper advertising, followed by his entr) into the department 
store field in Fort Smith, Ark., St. Louis, and Tulsa. 

As a pioneer in the use of radio advertising, Sperry has approached 
TV cautiously. "We recognize that TV must be considered as an ad- 
vertising medium in the years to come," he says. "But we do not 
feel that TV will affect or influence us to revise our present plans for 
using regular daytime broadcasting schedules again through 1951." 



16 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 

SAWROAY AFTERNOON MAGIC 

60 TO 75% OF AUDIENCE AND TOP SPONSOR 

identification 1 1 1 ALL IH THR£C WCEHS! 



February 5, 19!?1 




Richard Jones, Gen. Mgr., 
Radio Station WJBK, 
Detroit 1, Michigan 

Dear Dick: 



The January Videodex rating of Twin Pines Farm Dairy "Twin Movie 
Party", which appears on WJBK-TV, is so terrific that I want to 
tell you how we feel about the program's success. 

Within the four half -hour segments on WJBK-TV from U:00 to 6:00 
P.M. each Saturday afternoon, the Twin Pines double feature 
western program captures from 60% to 7$% of the audience. 

And talk about sponsor identification! "Milky", the Twin Pines 
magician-clown v/ho handles the commercials, appeared at a Mother- 
Son party in a Detroit public school. Without fanfare and with 
no introduction, "Milky" came out on the stage. The kids, in a 
single voice, roared . . . "It's Milky"! 

At the time, Twin Pines "Movie Party" had been on WJBK-TV for 
only three weeks. Yet the program had so endeared itself that all 
the young fry immediately identified "Milky" and the sponsor! 

We frankly feel that no other medium could possibly have made so 
complete and deep an impression in so short a time as did this 
television program on WJBK-TV. 

I'm happy to report all this to you, Dick, and to tell you how 
pleased we are with the cooperation we have had from WJBK-TV in 
making this program such a rousing success. 

Sincerely yours, 

JF, W/$IRN & FRJffJKEL, INC. 





LSW/cn Leon 5. Wayburn 

YOU, TOO, CAN REGISTER YOUR NAME AND SELL YOUR PRODUCT 
WITH REAL IMPACT IN DETROIT. WJBK delivers the goods — YOUR GOODS! 




WJBK 



-AM 

-FM 

-TV 



DETROIT 



The Station with a Million Friends 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, ELDORADO 5-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

26 FEBRUARY 1951 17 



whats 

happened! 

.inM ^' e ' 



Xfi 



cores 



WKRC Share of Audience 

Nov (9 0eo. i9W , 50 

Morning (Mon.-Fri.) 59>1% 

8 AM-12 Noon 

12 Noon-6 PM 

Evening (Sun.-SaO 41 . 5% 

6 PM10 P M 

S«" daV Af,e ^°° n 27.0% 61 - 7% 

12 Noon-6 PM 

Saturday Daytime ^ 25 . 6 % 

8 AM-6 PM 



in every period ■ 
In a four station market 



you cgnt make a tetter buy! 
national representative 

ADAM i. YOUNG, JR. INC. 



ON THE DIAL 710 




Dieiv developments on SPONSOR stories 





U.S. firms have upped radio in Puerto Rico. Publicidad Badillo agency execs above 



See: "Puerto Rico" 

Issue: 6 June 1949, p. 32 

Subject: Status of broadcasting 



Radio is getting a larger and larger slice of the ad budget in the 
increasingly important market of Puerto Rico. 

In sponsor's "Puerto Rico," 6 June 1949. it was stated that Puerto 
Ricans had spent some $220,000,000 for mainland products during 
1948. Today, the figure is about $340,000,000, and radio advertising 
has kept pace with the growth. 

"Most of the leading manufacturers and distributors of mass- 
consumption goods are spending more money on radio than on any 
other advertising medium in Puerto Rico." S. E. Badillo, president 
of the Publicidad Badillo advertising agency in San Juan, told 
sponsor. He said that most of the large advertisers, those spending 
between $50,000 and $150,000 a y£ar, have been gradually increas- 
ing their radio budgets yearly to the extent that some of them now 
spend as much as 80 r v of the total appropriation in radio. 

Badillos accounts, direct or in association with U. S. agencies, in- 
clude such United States advertisers as Borden, Lever Brothers, H. J. 
Heinz, Pabst, American Tobacco, Wrigley. Frigidaire, and Zenith. 
Nearly all have been large spenders lor Puerto Rican radio. 

To illustrate the trend, Badillo cited two case histories. 

1. "The product was one of the best sellers before World War II. 
but withdrew from the market during the war. After the war it 
came back, but found that it had no market at all. We surveyed the 
market at the consumer and retail levels, and as a result staged an 
intensive campaign that has put the product back to second place in 
the market, with good chances of its becoming the best seller. About 
84' < of the total appropriation went to spot radio advertising. 

2. "A leading manufacturer has been selling a specific brand of 
his product in this market for more than 30 years. He wanted to 
switch consumer demand for the 'old timer' to a new similar product, 
using another brand name. We achieved this within a few months 
through intensive distribution and merchandising, plus a well-planned 
ad campaign in which about 72' ( of the total budget went to radio." 

Recent surveys made in the metropolitan area of San Juan have 
shown that 91.99? of all families in the area have radios. 



18 



SPONSOR 



Your BEST BETS for sales in the West's 2 biggest markets 




You can bet on fast, sales-winning results when you use KHJ and KFRC as your entry into 
Los Angeles and San Francisco. Compare rates, service, selling ability and availabilities 
(whether you want programs, participations or choice "spots"), with other radio outlets in 
these 2 great markets. In fact, compare "cost-per-sales-impression" with any other media! Buy 
KHJ and KFRC, the 2 big sales-getters of don lee... the Nation's Greatest Regional Network. 



4fctcai£ 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



Represented Nationally by 

John Blair & Company 




26 FEBRUARY 1951 



19 



Two PERFEX Offers 
Prove KMA First! 

Here's Proof that KMA 
Gets Sales Results! 

Two mail offers by Perfex Manu- 
facturing Co., large soap pro- 
ducers, proved KMA No. 1 on a 
cost-per-order basis. The same 
offers were carried by stations 
from Ohio to Nebraska . . . from 
the Dakotas to Texas. Read the 
results below . . . 

OFFER I: On 35 stations PERFEX 
offered an aluminum griddle for 
$1.00 with a DEXOL box top. 

Station Cost per Order 

KMA — Shenandoah, Iowa $.0357 

2nd Station .0604 

3rd Station _ 0703 

35th Station __ „__ _. 4.1294 

OFFER 2: On 31 stations PERFEX 
offered a candy thermometer and 
recipe book for $.50 with a SHINA 
DISH box top. 

Station Cost per Order 

KMA— Shenandoah, Iowa ._ $.0240 

2nd Station .0410 

3rd Station .0519 

31st Station _ 19.7058 

Yes, KMA is "The Number One 

Farm Station in the Number 

One Farm Market!" 




KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 



Represented by 
Avery -Knodcl, Inc. 




Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 



iVMadison 



LIKES LANDRY COLUMN 

I have gotten a little behind in my 
reading, but over the weekend I caught 
up somewhat and noticed your new 
column. "Men. Money and Motives" 
written by my old friend. Robert J. 
Landry. 

This is just a line to tell you I am 
delighted to see Bob's by-line again and 
I feel certain sponsor's editorial con- 
tent will gain bv his inquiring attitude. 
' E. P. H. James 
Director. Centennial 
Public Relations 
Corning Glass Works 
Cor/iing. New York 



E. A. JONES TO NEW YORK 

I realize, of course, that we are too 
late to be of any use in your present 
plans for I saw the excellent piece you 
put together on automotive advertis- 
ing i "What gear do we shift to now?" 
1 January SPONSOR). Nevertheless. I 
wanted to drop you a note to tell you 
I will be permanently located at 444 
Madison Avenue and I will be happv 
to be of any service I can in the future. 

E. A. Jones 

Vice President 

MacManus. John & Adams. Inc. 

Detroit 



DAYTIME TV SECTION 

Congratulations on your ''Daytime 
Television" issue! It was the most 
complete job yet done and should be 
exceedingly helpful to all phases of the 
industry. 

Keep up the good work. 

Edward Codel 

Director of 77 

The Katz Agency 

New York 



I enjoyed your daytime television 
feature so thoroughlv that I won't 
even call your attention to your mis- 
crediting Chuck Wagon Playhouse to 
NBC instead of CBS. 

M. H. LeBlang 

Assistant Promotion Manager 

WCBS-TV 

New York 



That was an excellent issue on dav- 
time television. 

i ou may want to bring your readers 
up-to-date on television in Washington. 
The 1 February set figure, determined 
at a meeting of the Washington Televi- 
sion Circulation Committee is 233,910. 

Cody Pfanstiehl 

Director of Promotion 

WTOP 

Washington. D. C. 



FARM RADIO FACTS 

You undoubtedly have run articles 
in the past on the effectiveness of radio 
as against other media in the farm 
market. 

I would be pleased to receive a list- 
ing of the issues in which you carried 
any such information within the past 
two years. I would also appreciate any r 
further information you mav be able 
to offer. 

Edward B. Harvey 
Director of Radio. TV 
Geare-Marston 
Philadelphia 

• Reader Harvey is directed lo SPONSOR - * 
Farm Facts Handbook plus the 9 October 1950 
article. "The farm director, what a salesman!" 



VVQXR ON CICARETTES 

I was very much disturbed to see an 
inaccuracy in the story in the 4 Decem- 
ber issue of SPONSOR entitled "Times 
have changed." Evidently times have 
changed, and writers are not as care- 
ful as the) used to be because WQXR 
has never had a policy restricting cig- 
arette advertising. 

It is true that we do not accept lax- 
ative advertising or that of any prod- 
uct which we do not feel conforms with 
the acceptability of our programs in 
the home. 

I am at a loss to understand what 
the phrase "laxatives, cigarettes, or 
similar products" means, but cigarettes 
are always welcome among our spon- 
sors and have been since the late 
George Washington Hill himself put a 
program on WQXR for Herbert Tarey- 
ton cigarettes back in 193(>. 

I hope you will print this in order to 
set straight our position on cigarette 
advertising. 

Norman S. McGee 
Vice President. Sales 
WQXR-AM-FM 
\ en } ork 

(Please turn to page 79) 



20 



SPONSOR 




With the gals, MacEvelly was never inept. 
But the one that he fell for would never accept. 



« «'*. 







2. 



But at last he prevailed. His success was terrific 1 . 
He wangled one ticket to see South Pacific. 




Right show— and right audience— won his objective. 
With your Dayton sales you should be as selective 1 . 



To Make a Hit 
in Dayton* 

THE SHOW MUST GO ON 
WHIO-TV 



• WHIO-TV is the first and leading station- 
not only of Dayton, but of the whole, wide, 
rich Miami Valley as well. To sell these 
648,000 enthusiastic viewers, currently in con- 
stant touch with 162,000 TV sets, concentrate 
on our dominantf coverage. National Repre- 
sentative, G. P. Hollingbery Company, will 
gladly submit Pulse reports and market data. 



C MORAL: Why labor it? You get 
'em both — for Dayton — on 
Dayton's first and favorite 
station— WHIO-TV. 




t Pulse December report shows 
that WHIO-TV had 8 out 
of 10 top televised shows! 



26 FEBRUARY 1951 



21 



NORTH CAROLINA IS 



North Carolina Rates More Firsts 
In Sales Management Survey Than 
Any Other Southern State. 

More North Carolinians Listen to 
WPTF Than to Any Other Station. 





and NORTH CAROLINA'S 
NUMBER 1 SALESMAN IS... 




NBC 



AFFILIATE for RALEIGH, DURHAM 50/000 WATTS 
and Eastern North Carolina 680 KC 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE FREE & PETERS, INC. 



22 



SPONSOR 








A3AX 



LUSTRE- 



CfiKOLSN* 




UfE. 
SAVERS 



PET 

COl 



Today's top commercials: spot radio 



PART ONE 



OF A FOUR-PART STORY 



Musical, dramatic. Sonovox types among radio's bests 



©There are no by-lines for 
commercial writers. Few- 
prizes or citations are re- 
served for jingles the customers can t 
forget and copy that creates sales. But. 
to the sponsor, it's the commercial and 
its creative, sales-making flair which 
counts as much as programing and oth- 
er over-all strategic factors in broad- 
cast advertising. 

To put the spotlight on commercials 
which stand at the top of their art. 
sponsor will present four articles cov- 
ering commercials used in spot radio, 
network radio, spot television, and net- 
work television. This, the first of the 
series, covers six outstanding spot ra- 
dio commercials. 

The six commercials to be described 
and backgrounded here were chosen on 
the basis of extensive conversations 
with advertisers and agency executives. 

26 FEBRUARY 1951 



but no group of half a dozen commer- 
cials can possibly include all those de- 
serving praise. Instead, these are six 
which represent the best in spot radio; 
included are commercials of every 
type, from the jingle to the message 
beamed through a Sonovox. 

sponsor's six top commercials sell 
the following products: 

Lustre-C rente Shampoo (Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet Company, agency Len- 
nen & Mitchell. Inc. ) ; Life Savers ( Life 
Savers Corp., agency, Young & Rubi- 
cam. Inc.!; Ajax Cleanser (Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet Company, agency Sher- 
man & Marquette); Bronx o-Seltzer 
( Emerson Drug Company, agency 
BBDO I ; Flamingo Orange Juice 
I Leigh Foods, Inc., agency William 
Esty Company, Inc.) ; and Spud Cig- 
arettes I Philip Morris & Compain . Ltd.. 
Inc.. agency The Biow Company. Inc. I . 



These six spot commercials were 
most frequently praised by those polled, 
though no order of popularity was re- 
quested. Also mentioned as likely can- 
didates for the commercial Hall of 
Fame were announcements for the fol- 
lowing products: 

Tide (Procter & Gamble Compain. 
agency Benton & Bowles, Inc. I : Kools 
I the Brown & Williamson Tobacco 
Corp.. agency Ted Bates & Company I : 
Halo Shampoo (Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Compain . agency Sherman & 
Marquette I ; Piel's Beer I Piel Broth- 
ers, agency Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.) ; 
Rheingold Beer (United States Brew- 
ing Company, agency Smith. Benson & 
McClure. Inc. i : Carolina Rice (River 
Brand Rice Mills, agency Donahue \ 
Coe). 

Just as an example of what effective 
radio commercials like these can 



23 




Phillip Lennen wrote Lustre-Creme commercials 



achieve, here's what Leigh Foods has 
been able to do with their Flamingo 
Frozen Orange Juice jingle. 

The Flamingo air promotion began 
seven months ago in August 1950. 
Three months later, an October survey 
put Flamingo in second place among a 
field of seven brands of frozen orange 
juice; recognition of the commercial 
rated 44% among those interviewed. 
Today Flamingo is sold by 35 distrib- 
utors in 26 states; distribution contin- 
ues jumping to more and more states. 

Flamingo, like the majority of spot 
radio commercials today, uses a musi- 
cal jingle coupled with spoken copy. 
Jingles are not a must, however, as the 
highly successful Life Saver commer- 
cial proves. Life Saver has used plain 
dialogue consistently in its air adver- 
tising. Bromo-Seltzer uses a Sonovox 
effect for its well-recognized "talking 
train whistle." The Kool penguin ad- 
vises listeners to "Smoke Kooools. 
Smoke Kooools." 

Common as they are, jingles are not 
all cut from the same pattern. Lustre- 
Creme music is semi-classical, while 
Spud cigarettes" jingle is fast and pep- 
py, and Flamingo Orange Juice uses 
a calypso style. There are apparently 
no rules about the kind of music that 
works best in each case. 

I. Lustre-Creme 

Lustre-Creme, one of the top com- 
mercials singled <>ut. uses a jingle 
based on the semi-classical Toyland, 
a Victor Herbert melody. Here are the 
words Phillip W. Lennen. Hoard Chair- 



man of Lennen & Mitchell, set to the 
original music: 

Dream girl, dream girl. 

Beautiful Lustre-Creme girl; 

You owe your crowning glory to, 

A Lustre-Creme shampoo! 

Lennen was relaxing at home one 
evening playing records when he heard 
Toyland. Through some mental al- 
chemy, it occurred to him that here 
was a gentle, melodic bit of music that 
might sell Lustre-Creme. Back at the 
office the next day he went to work on 
some lyrics, tried the idea out on a few 
associates. Most were charmed by the 
low-pressure change from usual com- 
mercial jingle practice. But one possi- 
ble hitch was suggested: Mrs. Ella 
Bartlett. daughter of the late composer, 
might not care for such a close connec- 
tion between Lustre-Creme and her fa- 
ther's music. 

By this time Lennen had the lyrics 
completely written to his satisfaction : 
it was no time to give up the idea. He 
knew that a friend. Gene Buck of 
ASCAP. had been one of Victor Her- 
bert's life-long companions. Buck was 
persuaded to travel up to Mrs. Bart- 
lett's Lake Placid home and present 
the idea for her approval. 

Says Phil Lennen: "Mrs. Bartlett 
was tickled by the whole thing. She 
went to the copyright owners and put 
through her approval. By November 
of 1947 we were on the air with Dream 
girl." 

Lustre-Creme has used the jingle 
with its commercials on both network 
and spot radio, spends about $250,000 
a year on radio. Net shows have in- 
cluded Judy Canova. Kay Kyser. and 
Dennis Day. But the shampoo com- 
pany uses spot heavily. They aim one- 
minute announcements at women, buy- 
ing the station in each market which 
has the largest audience, regardless of 
cost. As a result of this effective use 
of radio, Lustre-Creme is the leading 
cream shampoo on the market today. 

2. Life Savers 

In an inflated economy where bus 
fares and telephone calls are now 10c. 
there is one bright spot left : Life Sav- 
ers are still only a nickel. That has 
been the story told by "the candv with 
the hole in the middle" \ ia spot radio. 
Young & Rubicam has favored cute 
dialogue for Life Savers all along. The 
agency started with a recorded con- 
versation between a teen-age boy and 
girl. The latest commercial has gone 
down the age scale another step; fea- 



tures two young kids who might be in 
the third grade. This is what they say: 

LITTLE BOY: "Gee. I wisht I had 
a million dollars." 

LITTLE GIRL: "I wisht I had a 
Life Saver." 

LITTLE BOY: "I wisht I owned a 
fire engine." 

LITTLE GIRL: "... a Pep-O-Mint 
Life Saver." 

LITTLE BOY: "I wisht I could fly 
to the moon." 

LITTLE GIRL: "Mmmm delicious 
Pep-O-Mint Life Savers. Only cost a 
nickel." 

LITTLE BOY {REAL DESPER- 
ATE) : "Gee I wisht I had a nickel!" 

Although children are the actors in 
this commercial, it's aimed at adults. 
Time slots are selected so as to reach 
both men and women — which means 
in the evening largely. New York. Chi- 
cago. Detroit. San Francisco, and Los 
Angeles are covered with a substantial 
60 to 90 announcements a week. 

William E. Forbes. Y & R account 
man, tells how this striking commer- 
cial came to be written : "The original 
idea came from a writer who has a 
young child himself, and has always 
liked to write about children (one of 
his published books is about a little 
boy who went to get a haircut, and the 
dire events that followed ) ." 

Although no research findings are 
available to show how effective the 
whimsical Life Saver commercial is, 
sponsor found it was one of the ones 
most frequently mentioned as arrest- 
ing. Probably its most appealing fea- 
ture is the naturalness of the two pint- 
sized actors who did the transcription. 
Of them Forbes says: 

"Our main concern was to have the 
children sound as natural as possible 
and to avoid any trace of 'acting' in 
reading the lines. The children are ac- 
complished actors but. like all children, 
somewhat unpredictable. Sensing that 
over-rehearsal might take some of the 
natural charm away from the reading, 
we let them amuse themselves in the 
studio, and then recorded when they 
were relaxed. The result was as if we 
had placed a 'candid microphone" near 
two youngsters talking to one an- 
other."' 

Young & Rubicam has no set sched- 
ule for changing commercials. They 
keep one running until its effectiveness 
appears to be waning, then slip in a 
new one. The dialogue transcriptions 
used so far have all scored very high 
(Please turn to page 54) 



24 



SPONSOR 



Case histories of SPONSOR'S six top commercials 



PRODUCT 









AGENCY 



OBJECTIVE 



AIR STRATEGY 



APPROACH AND RESULT! 



LENNEN & 
MITCHELL 



YOUNG & 
RUBICAM 



SHERMAN & 
MARQUETTE 



BATTEN, BARTON, 
DURSTINE, & 
OSBORN 



WILLIAM ESTY 
COMPANY 



THE BIOW 
COMPANY 



Lustre-Creme aim 

is to convert soap 
shampoo users to 
cream type. es- 
tablish leadership 
a m o 11 g cream 
shampoos. 



Life Savers seeks 
to boost sales by 
reminding people 
of continued five- 
cent price, flavor. 



Ajax had to es- 
tablish itself in 
highly-competitive 
cleanser held. As 
brand-new prod- 
uct, it needed dis- 
tribution. 



B r o m o - Seltzer 
wants to remain 
at least a strong 
fourth in head- 
ache-halting busi- 
ness, bucks "drug 
empire" products. 



Flamingo Orange 
Juice is a new 
brand in need of 
distribution in a 
field already 
crowded with 
firms which have 
head start. 



Spud cigarettes is 
making belated 
effort to catch 
booming competi- 
tor, Kools. and 
get its share of 
mentholated mar- 
ket. 



$250,000 a year radio 
budget goes into heavy 
spot schedule, network 
program. One-minute 
announcements are di- 
rected to women. Agen- 
cy buys stations on ba- 
sis of largest audience, 
regardless of cost. 



Five major markets are 
covered with about 
75 announcements per 
week in each. Adult 
men and women are 
reached by buying ad- 
jacencies to top pro- 
grams, mainly evenings. 



Half of Ajax radio bud- 
get goes into spot, buys 
145 stations in 120 mar- 
kets. Average announce- 
ment schedule: five per 
week. Daytime spots 
adjacent to women's 
programs are favored. 



Four per week an- 
nouncement schedules 
on about 45 stations in 
26 markets is supple- 
mented by a network 
radio show. One-min- 
ute and 20-second eve- 
ning spots favored, also 
sports adjacencies. 



Present 50-station radio 
spot and five-station TV 
spot campaign employs 
between 10 and 20 
weekly announcements. 
Housewives and young- 
sters are target for day- 
lime slots, kid show ad- 
jacencies. 



Present Spud spot ra- 
dio line-up calls for 122 
announcements weekly 
on seven New York 
City stations. Evening 
slots are most common 
— to catch men and 
women smokers. 



Low-pressure Victor Herbert mel- 
ody was converted i<> a commercial 
by Phil Lennen. board chairman of 
the agency, lly driving hard with 
the announcement since November 
1947, Lustre-Creme has been boost- 
ed to number one position among 
cream shampoos. 



Cute dialogue commercials involv- 
ing children have been the Life 
Saver style. Though short, an- 
nouncement is arresting because of 
its originality, proves successful 
commercial needn't have a jingle. 
Requires more frequent changes 
for effectiveness. 



Four-year-old Ajax fought its way 
to first place nationally, displacing 
Hab-O. Revolutionary "foaming 
cleanser" spearheaded rise with all- 
spot campaign originally, boosted 
sales to one-third of industry total 
with help of snappy jingle. 



Sales increase of about 50°r in past 
15 years is attributable to regular 
spot campaign coupled with a net- 
work program. Sonovox device 
gave Bromo-Seltzer its unique sound 
effect; used for 10 years. Emerson 
Drug spends less per sales dollar 
than competitors. 



After seven months, Flamingo's 
catchy calypso jingle has achieved 
44% recognition in survey of seven 
frozen orange juice efforts. Leigh 
Foods now has 35 distributors in 
26 states, expects to have 100 soon. 
Other Leigh frozen products: cof- 
fee, lemonade. 



Hard-selling Spud commercial uses 
a square-dance rhythm to promote 
"mouth happy" slogan and cool- 
ness of the mentholated cigarette. 
Willi Spuds and Kools only two na- 
tional-selling mentholated cigar- 
ettes, Spud goal has been to coun- 
ter highly successful Kool spot cam- 
paign. 



26 FEBRUARY 1951 



25 











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Harvey S. Firestone, Jr. (center) now Board Chairman of 
Firestone Tire & Rubber Company, took over helm from father (right). 
Personal family interest in "Voice of Firestone" has helped keep 
broadcast on continuously for 23 years. Firestone, Sr., chose network 
radio (NBC) to tell company's quality story, avoid any stigma from 
sale of low-cost tires. Institutional slant continued until simulcast. 





1% prs with t 

Firestone has radio's oldest naf 
alert to new trends I 



over-all 



I he / oice of Firestone is 
the oldest coast-to-coast net- 
work show on radio today. But when 
Harvey S. Firestone, founder of the 
Firestone Tire & Ruhber Company, 
gave the program his blessing in 1928. 
he wasn't gunning for a longevity rec- 
ord; he was merely attempting to solve 
an immediate problem. 

Bark in 1028. Harvey Firestone had 
just come to an important merchandis- 
ing decision. For the first time in the 
company's history, he was going to 
make a low-cost tire. His competition 
had forced him to the move, but. at 
the same time, he wanted to keep the 
company's reputation for quality in- 
tact. That's why he decided on a net- 
work program built around high-toned 
music. Thus the motive for sponsoring 



the Voice of Firestone, though it 
stemmed strictly from the market 
place, was institutional. 

From an original NBC hook-up of 
41 stations in 1928. the / oice of Fre- 
stone has grown to a current 140 sta- 
tions. Since 5 September 1949. when 
TV cameras began simulcasting the 
show, an additional 34 interconnected 
television stations have carried the 
I oice. 

The Monday evening 8:30 to 9:00 
time slot has remained the same, just 
as quality remains the priman Fire- 
stone pitch. The visual phases of the 
commercials, however, stress selling 
points to a greater degree than was 
usual in the spoken messages. 

Firestone, along with other members 
ol the rubber fraternity, always has 



favored classical and semi-classical 
music. Every one of the big four in 
rubber (Goodyear Tire & Rubber Com- 
pany. Firestone. United States Rubber 
Company, and the B. F. Goodrich 
Company, in order of sales I have spon- 
sored an orchestral show at one time 
or another. 

A traditional I oice of Firestone 
touch has also been the appearance of 
celebrated singers. For almost 15 
\ears. Richard Crooks was heard regu- 
larly, to be succeeded since 1944 by 
a succession of outstanding guest ar- 
tists. Rise Stevens. Eleanor Steber, Na- 
dine Conner. Lauritz Melchior Law- 
rence Tibbet. Giovanni Martinelli. Bidu 
Sayao, Ezio Pinza, and a dozen others 
have starred on the program. James 
Melton was one of those who got his 



PRE-TELEVISION: PROGRAM FEATURED AN ORCHESTRA, OPERA STARS SINGING CLASSICAL AND SEMI-CLASSICAL MUSIC 

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hi 1 program 

It net show, yet remains 

it successful musical simulcast 




Sitllllfcasf has altered "Voice of Firestone." Visual gimmicks, like 
rear-projected movies pictured above, add interest for video audience. 
Slides, photographs, production numbers with sets and costumed 
actors also liven visual aspects of the program. Format now restricts 
a particular artist to not over five guest appearances each year, 
preventing viewer boredom. See text for costs, techniques, results. 



start on the Voice of Firestone. 

Although Firestone has plunked 
down about a million dollars annually 
for the